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Downton Abbey Tea and Tour Raises Funds for 21st Century Library Campaign

Guests arrived at Grace and St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church in period dress and with their favorite tea cup for the Downton Abbey Tea and Tour, benefitting PPLD’s 21st Century Library Campaign. As harpist played, guests participated in Downton Abbey trivia, enjoyed British treats from local bakeries and sipped tea served from beautiful silver tea sets provided by Montague’s Parlour. Docents gave tours of the Church, explaining the fascinating history behind the Gothic Revival structure and the ornate stained glass and décor. Mr. Carson, Don Moon of Red Herring Productions, made an appearance for the evening and had his picture with guests in their lovely period outfits. To view pictures from the evening please click here.

Many thanks to all that participated in the Downton Abbey Tea and Tour!

Thank you to Downton Abbey Tea and Tour sponsors:

Bernideen’s
Boonzaaijer Bakery
Grace and St. Stephens Episcopal Church
Montague's Parlour
Oliver's Delicatessen
Renee Harp Studios
Toni and Guy Hair Dressing Academy
Willy's Emporium
Wisdom Tea House

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Click Here to Learn More and Donate!

Pikes Peak Library District’s 21st Century Library is designed to address the changing needs of our community, bringing the latest technologies to a new regional library, Library 21c.

MakerBot Replicator Z-18
With the MakerBot 3D printer, ideas and concepts become a reality! Adding the Z18 to the line of the library's existing smaller 3D printers, will allow the library's patrons to create quality, extra-large, industrial prototypes for various types of businesses and professional uses. Located in one of Library 21c's makerspaces, PPLD staff at Library 21c will engage patrons of all ages, introducing them to the technology of 3D printing and building real world skills.

The Impact
With your donation, PPLD will provide quality 3D printer services to our patrons who are developing concepts to further convey their ideas for products, businesses and other creative visions. Offering this innovative service will connect everyone in our community to cutting edge technology and more importantly, opportunity.

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This five-week Family Place Library series at Briargate Library is specifically designed for parents and their children ages 1 - 3. Play with toys and speak with library staff and community resource professionals on a different topic each week.

Registration is required. To register, click here or call (719) 260-6882.

  • Early Literacy Specialists
    Come together to play, interact with other families, and ask the Community Resource Specialist any questions on early literacy.
    Wednesday, April 2 from 9:30 - 11 a.m.
  • Speech Pathologist
    Come together to play, interact with other families, and ask the Community Resource Specialist any questions on speech. This is an informal event so, the CRS will not be able to give any specific diagnosis or details on your child/ren.
    Wednesday, April 9 from 9:30 - 11 a.m.
  • Nutrition
    Come together to play, interact with other families, and ask the Community Resource Specialist any questions on Nutrition.
    Wednesday, April 16 from 9:30 - 11 a.m.
  • Child Development
    Come together to play, interact with other families, and ask the Community Resource Specialist any questions on Child Development. This is an informal event so, the CRS will not be able to give any specific diagnosis or details on your child/ren.
    Wednesday, April 23 from 9:30 - 11 a.m.
  • Song and Movement
    Come together to play, interact with other families, and ask the Community Resource Specialist any questions.
    Wednesday, April 30 from 9:30 - 11 a.m.

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Christine Faith

This Manitou Springs Library Lecture Series at the Manitou Art Center (515 Manitou Ave.) is presented by Christine Faith, a well-known expert in urban farming and a Colorado Springs resident. She and her husband farm out of their backyard in the Ivywild neighborhood.

There is no registration for these free programs.

  • Backyard Farming
    Explore backyard farming, urban livestock, and local food production to help determine what place food production and food producing animals have or do not have in our cities.
    Sat., March 29 at 11 a.m.
  • Bees
    Learn about the history, advantages, and basic elements of urban honey bee keeping. Honey bees are required for the natural ecosystem, and are a component of agriculture and food production.
    Sat., April 26 at 11 a.m.
  • Miniature Vineyards & Miniature Orchards
    Growing anything along the Front Range can be a challenge. Growing fruit can be especially challenging with our poor soils, dry climate, and cold winters. Learn what to plant, how to plant it, and tricks to keep those plants thriving on your landscape.
    Sat., May 31 at 11 a.m.
  • Aquaponics
    An introductory overview class of aquaponic gardening. This class will include basic system types, initial set-up, fish selection, ideal plants, and expectations for an in-home aquaponics growing system.
    Sat., June 28 at 11 a.m.
  • Backyard Poultry
    Backyard chickens have come to symbolize the backyard farming movement, and for good reason. Chickens are productive, quiet, and beneficial members of a backyard farm.
    Sat., July 26 at 11 a.m.

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22nd Annual Frank Waters Award Luncheon

The Friends of the Pikes Peak Library District invite you to join us for a luncheon, author talk, and award presentation with authors Sandra Dallas and Kathy Brandt.

Click here to purchase tickets

When: Thursday, May 15, 2014, 11:15 - 11:45 a.m. check-in; 11:45 - 2 p.m. lunch and program
Where: Cheyenne Mountain Resort, 3225 Broadmoor Valley Road
Cost: $30 through May 1; $40 after May 1; $300 Reserved table of 8

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Jack Rinedollar of Rocky Mountain Sertoma recently presented a check for $7,000 to Pikes Peak Library District. The money will allow the District to install an “inductive loop” in its 400-person auditorium and various other rooms at its new facility, Library 21c, when it opens in June 2014.

The Audio Frequency Induction Loop is a way of transmitting sound through a wire loop to the telecoil in a hearing aid. Loops are used to improve speech intelligibility for hearing aid users by eliminating background noise. Background noise can completely block the voice of the speaker for many hearing aid users. With the loop, hearing aid users may hear nearly as well as those with normal hearing.

Rocky Mountain Sertoma is one of 10 local Sertoma clubs. Each club has a primary mission to provide assistance to hearing- and speech-impaired individuals. Since 1988, through a District project called “HEARS,” the individual clubs provide support and donations for audiology services and new hearing aids for hearing-impaired, low-income individuals who cannot afford to purchase them.

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Adult Reading Program Wrap-up

PPLD conducted a random drawing for the 2014 Adult Reading Program prize winners today. Grand prizes will go to participants from the Old Colorado City, Penrose, and Ute Pass Libraries. In addition, one participant from each community Library won a prize. Winners will be notified by March 20.

Thank you for your participation in the 10th Annual Adult Reading Program!

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Our Courts Colorado

Join us for a series of free classes taught by volunteers from the Colorado Bar Association. Registration is encouraged but not required. To register, click on the program title or call (719) 389-8968.

  • Cortes Estatales al Servicio de Colorado
    (en español) How Colorado's procedures for selecting, disciplining, and evaluating judges keep our state courts fair and impartial. Presented by Judge Daniel Taubman, who has served on the Colorado Court of Appeals since 1993.
    Sat., March 15 from 1 - 2:30 p.m. at Sand Creek Library, 1821 S. Academy Blvd.
  • Our State Courts
    How Colorado's procedures for selecting,disciplining, and evaluating judges keep our state courts fair and impartial. Presented by Judge Richard L. Gabriel, appointed to the Colorado Court of Appeals in 2008, and prior to that in private practice focusing on commercial, intellectual property, probate, and products liability litigation, all including appeals.
    Mon., March 17 from 6 - 7:30 p.m. at Penrose Library, 20 N. Cascade Ave.
  • Our United States Courts
    The types of cases that are heard in the federal courts and the procedures that keep our federal courts fair and impartial. Presented by Gwendolyn M. Solomon.
    Wed., March 19 from 6 - 7:30 p.m. at Penrose Library, 20 N. Cascade Ave.
  • See You in Court: The Life of a Civil Lawsuit
    This presentation discusses the purposes of civil lawsuits, a party’s rights and remedies in such lawsuits, how such lawsuits are commenced and how they proceed, what really happens at trial, and the roles of the judge, the jury, and the lawyers in these proceedings. Presented by Judge Ann Rotolo, who serves the Fourth Judicial District, and also on the Colorado Supreme Court's Civil Rules Committee. Before joining the bench, Judge Rotolo was in private practice, served as El Paso County's Deputy County Attorney, and was a magistrate for the Fourth.
    Mon., March 24 from 6 - 7:30 p.m. at East Library, 5550 N. Union Blvd.
  • Law & Order: The Life of a Criminal Case
    This presentation discusses the roles of the judge, the jury, the prosecution, and the defense in a criminal case, how criminal cases are brought and how they proceed, the setting of bail, the plea bargaining process, what really happens in a criminal trial, and how judges determine the appropriate sentences after a conviction. Presented by Matthew R. Zehe.
    Mon., April 7 from 6 - 7:30 p.m. at East Library, 5550 N. Union Blvd.
  • Cortes Federales al Servicio de Colorado
    (en español) The types of cases that are heard in the federal courts and the procedures that keep our federal courts fair and impartial. Presented by Judge Daniel Taubman, who has served on the Colorado Court of Appeals since 1993.
    Sat., April 12 from 1 - 2:30 p.m. at Sand Creek Library, 1821 S. Academy Blvd.
  • Divorce in Colorado Courts
    This presentation covers how
    divorce cases proceed in Colorado Courts. Specifically, it explores the differing interest at stake, the issues that need to be addressed in a typical divorce case, the different ways in which divorce cases are resolved, and the ongoing role of the court in divorce cases in Colorado. Presented by Teresa M. Wilkins.
    Wed., April 23 from 6 - 7:30 p.m. at East Library, 5550 N. Union Blvd.
  • Introducción a los Tribunales de Inmigración
    (en español) A general walk through of immigration law and the court system surrounding immigration. Presented by Lisa Guerra.
    Sat., April 26 from 1 - 2:30 p.m. at Sand Creek Library, 1821 S. Academy Blvd.
  • An Economic Fresh Start: Bankruptcy Basics
    This presentation discusses how bankruptcy cases work. Specifically, it describes the history of bankruptcy and how it has evolved into the present system, the different kinds of bankruptcy cases that can be filed, and the basic components of an individual bankruptcy case. Presented by Sandra Sigler, an attorney specializing in civil litigation, bankruptcy law, and matters arising from the financial exploitation of elders.
    Wed., April 30 from 6 - 7:30 p.m. at East Library, 5550 N. Union Blvd.

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KRDO News Radio interviewed our very own Monica Davis regarding services for seniors at PPLD:

http://www.krdo.com/newsradio/32-seniortalk/-/462220/24693732/-/us7dshz/...

Visit our Senior resources on ppld.org.

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Library 21c is currently undergoing renovation.

Stakeholders of Pikes Peak Library District have spent more than five years developing a model of 21st century library service for the Pikes Peak region, but efforts will only start in earnest with the opening of the new library facility in June of this year. From that moment on, PPLD will begin to implement, replicate, and deploy its library service model for the future.

21st Century Library service is a movement at PPLD, one that employs technology and the redeployment of people to propel libraries to the center of community life. They become places where content is created and shared, and where books and other resources are linked with programs and activities. It is a movement that will affect every library in and every aspect of the district.

Central to the new model and the renewed space is the most basic of library tenets: providing access to information. Fine tuned to meet the needs of 21st century patrons, PPLD will provide exactly what the patron needs, in the format they desire, at the very moment it will benefit them most: aka “speed sourcing” for the 21st Century.

PPLD’s new library facility, located at 1175 Chapel Hills Drive and slated to open in June, is the prototype and “launch pad” for 21st century library service. Its state-of-the-art spaces and resources will make it the first of its kind in the country.

As work began on selecting a name for the new facility, several considerations came into play: this is a modern facility that will serve our entire service region and beyond; it’s a model and a resource that will move everyone forward; it’s the library of our shared future. The 21st Century Library needs a name that says just that.

With all of this in mind, PPLD will name its new facility Library 21c.

It is a simple, compelling name that invites curiosity and that suits the services and spaces the building will contain: Hot Spot, eHelp, Make, Hub. It suits the mission it will fulfill: to announce that libraries are new and innovative.

Some of the spaces and resources that fit especially well include The Venue at 21c and 21central, a portal for critical community information, and especially C3 the Creative Computer Commons.

Library 21c, approved by PPLD’s Board of Trustees in late February, also reflects the transition going on in library resources from the traditional to the virtual, and beyond, to the concept of creating and co-creating. PPLD wants the community to recognize the shift in public libraries – and to value that change.

Work on the new facility and East and Penrose libraries continues. Information on the project and ways to support it can be found online at ppld.org/21centurylibrary.

Leaders at PPLD find the “c” component edgy and flexible, “c” for century; “c” for change; “c” for connections; “c” for create; “c” for community. Programs, partnerships, and new services will build on the name in creative and appealing ways, such as PPLD’s 21catalyst: Crowdsourcing for Entrepreneurs and Nonprofits, and 21cents: The Campaign to Grow Young Philanthropists.

“We see this as our opportunity to take the edge and make it our own. The community has C4C [City for Champions]. There is a push to think differently, act in new ways, and create change,” said Paula Miller, PPLD’s Executive Director. “Library 21c is our addition to that movement. Think: 21c – your 21st century library. We’ve given the region over a hundred years of excellence … Library 21c lets us declare the next century of extraordinary public library service.”

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