Try It!

Tween Twist Take and Make: T-Shirt Scarves

Take and Makes for this project will be available at area PPLD Libraries starting Friday, Dec. 4, 2020.

Watch this project here: https://youtu.be/v8AGvL83YRc

Supplies:

  • 1 T-shirt from home or Take and Make
  • Scissors

Directions:

  1. Lay out the t-shirt on a flat surface.
  2. Measure 1 inch up from the bottom hem and cut in a straight line all the way across. You will have a loop of fabric when you’re finished.
  3. Continue cutting 1 inch strips from the t-shirt. Stop when you reach the sleeves. When you finish, you should have a pile of loops.
  4. Stretch the loops out as far as you can by pulling at both ends.
  5. Once you’ve stretched all the loops, set one aside and line the rest up with one another. You will end up with one big loop made up of many strands.
  6. The next step is to tie them in place so that they stay together. Start by creating the tie. Take the loop that you set aside earlier. Now, cut the loop so that instead you have one long strand of fabric. Cut it in half so that you have 2 long strands.
  7. Optional: if you want to attach a braid to your scarf, cut three strips of fabric from what’s left of the t-shirt. Stretch them, tie a knot at the top, and braid them. You will tie the braid to the scarf in the next step.
  8. Now you will use one of the strips you cut in step 6 to tie the loops of the scarf together. Take one of the strips you cut and tie a square knot (right over left, then left over right) around all the loops (and one end of the braid if you made one). This will hold your scarf together.
  9. Now wrap the rest of the strip of fabric around the knot, covering it up, and continue wrapping until you’ve used up almost all the fabric. Once you have just an inch or two left, tie another knot and tuck it under the wrap to hide it.
  10. If you added a braid, take the second strip of fabric you cut and repeat steps 8 and 9 with the other end of the braid to secure it to the scarf. The scarf will be knotted in two places. Otherwise, you can either discard the 2nd strip of fabric or tie another section if you like how it looks.
  11. Loop it around your neck. You have a scarf!
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TAKE AND MAKE: Homeschool: Keith Haring Action Figures Art Project

Take and Makes for this project will be available at area PPLD Libraries starting Nov. 28, 2020.

Watch this project at: https://youtu.be/VzCjt-OQf_s?list=PLMEg2Dd0dSFctLfDQxsL5SmuE8zkwQFmu

Supplies:

  • Action figure template (in kit)
  • Guided drawing sheet (in kit)
  • Colored cardstock (half sheets) (in kit)
  • White drawing paper (in kit)
  • Bubble wrap (in kit)
  • Packing peanuts (in kit)

You supply:

  • Markers (colors and a black permanent)
  • Tempera or acrylic paints (optional)
  • Pencil
  • Scissors
  • Glue

Directions:

Drawing the Figures (Two Different Ways)

  1. Cut out your templates and use them to trace the figures onto colored cardstock. Cut out your colored cardstock figures. These are the figures you’ll use in your project.
  2. Or … use the guided drawing sheet to draw your own figures on the colored cardstock and cut them out. You can also draw from observation (looking at the figures) and your imagination!
    *You might want to start with pencil, but be sure to go over your outlines using a black marker that makes a bold line. Cut near the outside edge of the black line.

Create the Background (Three Ideas)
The white drawing sheet is the background paper. You can use markers or paints to create the background.

  1. Draw a line across the paper, starting about a hand’s width from the bottom. Make it bold using a black marker. This is the foreground. You can use markers or paint to fill in the foreground and background (above the line) using two contrasting colors. You could also add a simple design in the foreground, like Keith Haring … black dash marks or a black line doodle design.
  2. Or … using a craft paint (tempera or acrylic), paint the sheet of bubble wrap. A primary color makes this Pop Art POP! Carefully lay the blank white sheet of drawing paper on top of the bubble wrap and gently “massage.” Be careful not to let the paper slide around. Carefully lift the paper off the bubble wrap and set aside to dry.
  3. Or … try making a black line “doodle” design that covers the solid white paper, another Keith Haring favorite.
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KidsMAKE: Craft Stick Scrolls

Take and Makes for this project will be available at area PPLD Libraries beginning this Friday, Nov. 20, 2020.

Watch this project at: https://youtu.be/XkX6xyy3Ai8?list=PLMEg2Dd0dSFenhH3jVzKk-QmaHXdAFOBq

Supplies:

  • Construction paper (in kit)
  • Craft sticks (in kit)
  • Ribbon (in kit)
  • Scissors
  • Markers
  • Decorations

Directions:

  1. Decorate craft sticks with markers, glitter - anything!
  2. Cut the paper long, but slightly less wide than the craft sticks.
  3. Write a letter, secret note, or create art on one side of your paper.
  4. Glue a craft stick to the top and a craft stick to the bottom of the same side as your art. Let the glue dry.
  5. Roll the bottom craft stick up to the top like a scroll.
  6. Tie a ribbon around your scroll!

craft stick scroll

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Take and Make STEM: Science of Flight

This Science of Flight Take and Make STEM project will be available at area PPLD Libraries starting Nov. 13, 2020 and is intended for ages 5-12.

Watch these projects at: https://youtu.be/6W6ZtLCe1ow?list=PLMEg2Dd0dSFctLfDQxsL5SmuE8zkwQFmu

Materials provided in Take and Make:

Materials you provide:

  • Tape
  • Hole punch (or something else to poke a hole)
  • Scissors

The Science of Flight

Four forces of flight not only affect how an airplane flies, but also affect a paper airplane. These forces – lift, thrust, drag, and weight – determine how a plane will fly.

  • Lift is the force that keeps the plane in the air. Lift works opposite the weight of the plane.
  • Thrust is the force that propels the plane forward.
  • Drag acts opposite to the direction of motion. This force is affected by friction and differences in air pressure.
  • Weight is the force of gravity. The pull of an object toward the center of the earth.

In today’s Science of Flight activity, we’ll do several activities. Since paper airplanes are subject to the same forces as actual airplanes, think about the forces of flight and experiment to see what helps your plane fly straighter, more accurately, or farther.

Paper Airplanes:

Use the paper to create paper airplanes. See the pdf link below for the template. Which ones fly the farthest? Which has the best aim? How can you adapt them to change their flight? Test them out.

Paper Airplane catapult:

Start by using the template to create a paper airplane. Just fold on the numbers in order, always folding to the inside so you cover the number with the fold. Once your airplane is folded, punch or poke a hole through all layers about 2 inches from the nose of the plane. Push a rubber band through your hole and then put one end of the rubber band through the other and pull gently. Fly the airplane by hooking the rubber band to your thumb or finger, gently pulling back on the airplane, and then letting go of the plane. See how far it will go! Can you aim it?

Whirly-gig:

Take the whirly-gig in your Take and Make or go to the NASA link above to print out a Mars Helicopter template. On the end where the paper is divided in half, fold the halves in opposite directions. On the part that’s divided into thirds, fold the 2 outside parts in on the dotted lines and then fold the bottom up twice. Either toss the Whirly-gig straight up or drop it from a high place and watch it float down. Experiment with it.

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Tween Twist: Election Day Bottle Cap and Fridge Magnets

Take and Makes for these projects will be available at area PPLD Libraries starting this Friday, Nov. 6, 2020.

Supplies provided:

  • Bottle cap
  • “I Voted” sticker
  • Blank sticker
  • Epoxy sticker
  • Circle or square magnet
  • Blank business card
  • Rectangular magnet

Supplies needed (from home):

  • Markers or colored pencils

Watch the “how to” video on PPLD TV: https://youtu.be/GPgX1oKgfNE?list=PLMEg2Dd0dSFctLfDQxsL5SmuE8zkwQFmu

Bottle Cap Magnets:

  1. Choose if you want to use the “I Voted” sticker or design your own. If you would like to design your own sticker, do so on the blank white sticker (not the clear, thick sticker).
  2. Peel off one sticker and stick to the inside of the bottle cap.
  3. Peel off the epoxy sticker (the clear, thick sticker) and place on top of the first sticker inside of the bottle cap. Press down to make sure it is stuck tight.(Avoid touching the back of the sticker as it will leave fingerprints.)
  4. Peel the adhesive backing off the small round or square magnet. Stick the magnet to the back of the bottle cap.

Fridge Magnets

  1. Decorate the blank business card. You can design it however you want. Some ideas include drawing a mini poster for your favorite fictional character or writing out words on the business card to make magnetic poetry.
  2. If you decide to make magnetic poetry, start by drawing 4 light pencil lines on your business card. Then write out election day themed words with colored markers. Be sure to include some articles (a,an,the), some descriptive words, overreactions, and some nouns (like people, animals, places, or things). Your imagination is the limit! (Only decorate one side of the business card).
  3. Peel off the back of the rectangular magnet and stick it to the back of the decorated business card. You now have a fridge magnet! If you decided to create magnetic poetry, use a pair of scissors to cut out each individual word,then arrange them into funny or meaningful poetry phrases.

Want to share your creations? Tag us on Facebook @ppldteens or @ppldkids.

magnet 1magnet 2magnet 3

magnet 4magnet 5

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Homeschool Creepy Science

Note: See pdf file below to print and see pictures of activities.Watch these projects at: https://youtu.be/HXYILnF5914?list=PLMEg2Dd0dSFctLfDQxsL5SmuE8zkwQFmu

I. MAGIC PUMPKIN

Supplies:

  • Large bag of Reese’s Pieces
  • Measuring cup with hot tap water (works best with freshly boiled water due to Colorado’s high altitude; an adult can place in a measuring cup and pour)
  • White plate or platter
  • Toothpicks or small straws

Directions:

  1. Arrange your Reese’s Pieces in the shape of a pumpkin. We placed the orange candies in a circle to form the sides and used four brown candies to make the stem at the top. You can add a brown mouth and maybe even yellow for the eyes if you like. Do you like theway it looks?
  2. What do you predict will happen once we add the water? In science, we call your guess a hypothesis. Tell each other your guesses or write them down. You can even draw what your pumpkin looks like now and what you think it will look like after we add the warm water. This is called the Scientific Method (see below for more information on the Scientific Method).
  3. Very slowly add some hot water, pouring along the outside edge of the pumpkin. Add only enough water to cover the plate (adult help may be required).
  4. The magic pumpkin will slowly appear! Enjoy a couple nibbles of candy and watch what the water does. You can use your toothpicks or straws to swirl the colors. It’s magical!

Project adapted from: https://www.playdoughtoplato.com/magic-pumpkin-science/

II. CREEPY SCIENCE EXPERIMENTS WITH DRY ICE

SAFETY NOTE: Dry ice can be purchased at the Customer Service counter in the grocery store. Keep it in the heavy plastic bag it comes in! The ice should be purchased the same day you plan to use it; it will gradually sublimate, returning to its gaseous state, if it sits unused for too long. Don’t plan to store the dry ice in your freezer! It is so cold that it will trick your freezer into thinking that it needs to shut off!
Do plan to store it in a Styrofoam chest … unless you are going to use it as soon as you get it
home. An adult should oversee these projects for safety.
.

Screaming Dry Ice

Supplies:

  • Dry ice
  • Heavy work gloves
  • Stainless-steel tongs

Directions:

  1. Using a pair of heavy work gloves (leather is best), hold a piece of dry ice in one hand, and a pair of stainless-steel kitchen tongs in the other. Use the tongs to securely grab hold of the chunk of dry ice.
  2. As the room temperature tongs bring heat to the surface of the extremely cold dry ice, the ice will begin to sublimate (kind of like “melting” from a solid back to a gas). The process causes the tongs to slightly vibrate, producing a high-pitched scream! So be prepared!
  3. Set your dry ice aside for another experiment.

Spooky Bubbling Tower

Supplies:

  • Dry ice
  • Heavy work gloves
  • Hammer
  • Tall glass container
  • Tray or cookie sheet with low sides
  • Very warm water
  • Food coloring
  • Dawn dish soap

Directions:

  1. With a gloved hand, place your plastic bag of dry ice on a surface that will allow you to hammer the ice into some smaller chunks (not too tiny) … like a sidewalk or driveway. Leave all the pieces in the bag and return them to the Styrofoam chest until you need them.
  2. Place the glass container on a tray or cookie sheet. Fill the container with 2-3” of very warm water.
  3. With your gloved hand, pick up a couple of ice chunks and place them in the container. The water will bubble as the ice begins to sublimate, and carbon dioxide gas will be released from the ice in the form of a misty “smoke,” or “fog.” Put your hands in the
    “fog” and blow it around a bit!
  4. While the water is rapidly bubbling (you may need to add 2-3 more chunks of ice … don’t forget the leather glove), add a couple drops of food coloring for a spooky potion.
  5. Next, drizzle in some Dawn dish soap. This will produce a bubbling tower! The movement of the water, caused by the sublimating ice, will cause soap bubbles to form, bubbles that are filled with carbon dioxide. Go ahead … POP a handful of bubbles. Then watch to find out how long it takes for the ice to completely sublimate and escape in the form of a gas in the soap bubbles.

Crystal "Bubble" Ball

Supplies:

  • Dry ice
  • Heavy work gloves
  • Glass mixing bowl with rounded rim (less than 12” in diameter)
  • Tray or cookie sheet
  • Very warm water
  • Dawn dish soap
  • Strip of cotton fabric (old t-shirt)
  • Small plastic cup

Directions:

  1. Mix 2 tablespoons dish soap with 1 tablespoon warm water in the small cup. Submerge the cotton strip in the cup to soak.
  2. Fill the glass bowl half full with very warm water. Place on tray or cookie sheet. Add a few chunks of dry ice to the water so that a lot of “fog” is produced.
  3. Dip a finger in the soap/water solution and run your finger around the rim of the bowl, wetting the rim surface.
  4. Remove the cotton strip from the cup, running your fingers down it to remove excess soap. Stretch the cloth between your hands and slowly pull the soapy cloth across the rim of the bowl. Your goal is to create a soap film that stretches across the entire bowl.
    *It might take a little practice to master the technique! The thin layer of soap stretched across the rim of the bowl traps the expanding cloud of carbon dioxide gas to create a giant bubble … a kind of crystal ball perfect for looking into the future!

III. FROG EYES (Edible Water Beads):

Supplies:

  • Tapioca pearls
  • Food coloring (if desired)
  • Pot for boiling water
  • Colander
  • Container for bead play

Directions:

  1. Follow instructions on package for boiling Tapioca.
  2. Once boiled, rinse Tapioca under cool water.
  3. If desired, divide pearls into separate containers, add food coloring, let sit for about 15 minutes, then rinse.
  4. Place beads into container and have fun!
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MAKE: Cupcake Liner Monsters

Pick up your Cupcake Liner Monster Take and Make at area PPLD Libraries beginning this Friday, Oct. 23, 2020

Supplies:

  • Construction paper
  • 1 cupcake liner
  • Googly eyes
  • 1 craft stick
  • Glue (not in Take and Make)
  • Scissors (not in Take and Make)
  • Markers (optional)

Directions:

  1. Start by flattening your cupcake liner and glue it onto the piece of construction paper to give it more weight. Cut out the cupcake liner.
  2. Cut out a mouth, arms, legs, horns, and teeth (or whatever you want on your monster) from your construction paper and glue them onto your cupcake liner. Glue the googly eyes onto your puppet. Make it scary or silly!
  3. Add some glue to the top of your craft stick and glue your cupcake liner onto it. Once it has dried completely, you can have fun putting on a puppet show with your monster puppet!

For video instructions, check out last Tuesday, October 20's video for detailed instructions with one of our librarians here: https://youtu.be/e60Ig4x0XXQ?list=PLMEg2Dd0dSFctLfDQxsL5SmuE8zkwQFmu

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STEM: Clothespin Button Racers

The Take and Make for this project will be available at area PPLD Libraries starting Fri., Oct. 16, 2020.

Supplies:

  • 1 plastic straw
  • 2 twist ties (or bread ties) or two paper clips
  • 1 clothespin
  • 4 same size buttons
  • Scissors

Directions:

  1. Cut 2 straw pieces that are each about 1 inch long.
  2. Slide a twist tie through each straw.
  3. Use the bread tie to secure a button at each end of the straw by looping the tie back through the button hole.
  4. Clip one axle to the clothespin.
  5. Slide the second axle into the back of the clothespin as close to the spring as possible.
  6. Use a rubber band to secure it in place.
  7. Begin racing!

racer 1racer 2racer 3

racer 4

Find the tutorial video at: https://ppld.librarymarket.com/virtual-stem-clothespin-racers

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Tween Twist: Dragon Eggs

TAKE AND MAKE: Tween Twist: Dragon Eggs
Pick up your Take and Make supplies at area PPLD Libraries starting this Fri., Oct. 9, 2020

Supplies:

  • Styrofoam egg
  • Box of thumbtacks
  • glue
  • toothpick
  • Optional supplies: Sharpie markers, nail polish, or rhinestones

Watch the “how to” video on PPLD TV https://youtu.be/YyPNAoIxy3w

Directions:

  1. Start the dragon egg at the very bottom of the Styrofoam egg. You can glue this “starter” tack in for stability.
  2. Insert tacks into the egg so that they overlap the “starter” tack and each other. The tacks overlap like fish scales.
  3. Keep adding tacks, overlapping them as you move up the egg and cover it with tacks.
  4. You will put a final tack at the very top. You can also glue this tack to help it stay in.
  5. You can add glue to any tacks that feel loose or like they might fall out. Use a toothpick to push the glue in where it needs to go.
  6. If desired, you can use colored sharpies, nail polish, and/or rhinestones to further decorate your egg.

dragon egg 1dragon egg 2

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STEM: Zany Zip Line

Supplies:

(Pick up your Take and Make for this project at area PPLD libraries starting this Friday, Oct. 2)

  • String (fishing line, or unwaxed dental floss)
  • Pipe cleaners
  • Binder clips
  • Several large paper clips
  • Recycled container to use for carrier (yogurt container, paper cups, empty boxes, etc.)
  • Hole punch or scissors
  • Masking tape and/or scotch tape
  • Paper and pencil
  • Small plastic animal

Directions:

To make your carrier:

  1. Brainstorm how you want to make your carrier and what you want to make it out of.
  2. Punch holes in the sides of the container for the pipe cleaners.
  3. Thread the pipe cleaner(s) through the holes and twist them into place.
  4. Add binder clip or paper clip to act as your pulley.

To set up your zip line:

  1. Run a 4-foot length of string between two objects, such as a chair and a stack of books on the ground.
  2. Be sure the zip line is at least two feet higher on one end than on the other.
  3. Use masking tape or scotch tape to attach your string. You want to be able to easily undo one end of the zip line to attach the carrier to it.

Zany ziplineZany zipline

Watch this project at: https://youtu.be/yAJUMuPC0Vc?list=PLMEg2Dd0dSFeL2073EuA0bc6TD1nM8wUN

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PPLD Homeschool: Cooking Up Some Fun!

Submit a recipe to Pikes Peak Library District's A Harvest of Recipes digital cookbook!
Use this link to upload your recipe: https://ppld.librariesshare.com/ppldrecipes/

Some Fun Facts about Grilled Cheese
❖ Though similar recipes were mentioned in ancient Roman texts, the grilled cheese sandwich was technically invented in France in 1910, known as the Croque Monsieur.
❖ However, most experts agree that the first grilled cheese sandwiches were made in the United States in the 1920s when Otto Frederick Rohwedder invented a bread slicer that made distributing white bread easy and affordable.
❖ Shortly before that, processed cheese has been patented by James L. Kraft, whose pasteurizing process ensured that cheese would not spoil, even when transported great distances (the first Kraft plant opened in Illinois in 1914).
❖ During WWII, Navy Cooks prepared open faced grilled cheese sandwiches on Navy ships as instructed by government issued cookbooks. These sandwiches were called “American Cheese Filling Sandwiches.”
❖ In 1949, people finally began to add the second slice of bread to the top of this sandwich to make it more filling, and the sandwich we all know and love was born.
❖ The name “grilled cheese” wasn’t used until the 1960s; before then it was called “toasted cheese” or “melted cheese” sandwiches.
❖ Approximately 3/4 of people who buy sliced cheese make at least one grilled cheese sandwich per month.
❖ National Grilled Cheese Day is celebrated on April 12th!

Recipes:(Please use adult help with slicing or heating!)
Watch these grilled cheese recipes at: https://youtu.be/6_hqpb7EO4k

I. Allison’s Grilled Cheese Sandwich
Ingredients:
Bread
Butter
Cheese slices (thin)
Optional (onion, apple, kale)
Stone ground mustard
--experiment with your own ingredients—
Instructions:
Butter bread slices on one side, flip slices over and add mustard to insides of bread.
Stack up ingredients between bread slices.
Place in heated frying pan (low to medium heat); cover with lid.
Cook on low to med. heat until bread is toasty and golden on one side; flip over until done. Cheese should be melted.

II. Betty’s Gluten and Dairy Free Grilled Cheese Sandwich
Ingredients:
Gluten-free bread
Vegan butter spread
Sliced vegan “cheese”
Avocado (optional)
Mustard
Instructions:
Butter bread slices on one side, flip slices over and add sliced cheese.
Scoop out avocado and spread (if desired); add mustard to top slice.
Place in heated frying pan (low to medium heat); cover with lid.
Cook on low to med. heat until bread is toasty and golden on one side; flip over until done. Adjust heat as needed. Cheese should be melted.

III. Brady’s Grilled Cheese
Ingredients:
Whole wheat bread (or bread of your choice)
Butter
Garlic clove (broken open)
Mayonnaise
Cheese slices (American, grated cheddar, or your choice)
Instructions:
Cover all sides of bread with mayonnaise.
Heat non-stick electric griddle; carefully rub with butter and clove of garlic.
Place one slice of bread on hot pan.
Add cheese; top with other slice of bread.
Cook until bread is toasty and golden on one side; flip over until done.
Cheese should be melted.

IV. Amanda’s Easy Creamy Microwave Tomato Soup in a Mug
Ingredients:
7 oz. diced tomatoes
½ tbsp. tomato paste
½ cup broth
1/8 cup light cream
Optional (to taste): sweet yellow onion, basil, pesto, salt and pepper
Supplies:
Mug
Blender
Microwave
Instructions:
Add all ingredients together in blender.
Blend until smooth.
Transfer soup into a microwave safe mug.
Microwave for one minute.
Let cool and enjoy!

V. Athena’s Cake in a Mug Recipe
Ingredients:
1/4 cup flour
2 tbs. sugar
1/2 tsp. baking powder
A pinch of salt
1/4 cup milk
1 tbs. oil
1/2 tsp vanilla extract
Instructions:
Pour the dry ingredients into your mug and mix.
Add the wet ingredients, and then mix until there are no large clumps or dry flour at the bottom of the mug.
Microwave for 90 seconds. (You may need to adjust this 10 seconds in either direction, based on your microwave's power.)
Be careful pulling the hot mug out of the microwave!
At this point, you could add some icing or a scoop of ice cream, or eat your cake plain. Enjoy!

Citations and Resources:
“Kids Vs. Science: Making The Greatest Grilled Cheese;” Mental Floss video; https://youtube.com/watch?v=tAN6vC7-YeA
“How chemistry creates the perfect, gooey grilled cheese sandwich;” PBS News Hour; http://pbs.org/newshour/science/grilled-cheese-chemistry-forever
“What a cheesy sandwich looks like in 15 places around the world;” Insider; http://insider.com/grilled-cheese-around-the-world-2018-10
“History of the Grilled Cheese Sandwich;” Daily Dish Magazine; http://foodiefriendsfridaydailydish.com/national-grilled-cheese-month-hi...
“The History of the Grilled Cheese;” The Committed Pig blog;
http://www.thecommittedpig.com/the-history-of-the-grilled-cheese-and-how...
“The History of the Grilled Cheese Sandwich;”
https://recipes.howstuffworks.com/history-of-grilled-cheese.htm

Photo by Micheile Henderson on Unsplash

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Piratepalooza! Books "RRRR" Me Treasure

SUPPLIES:

  • Pirate Coloring Sheet Find and print it here: http://www.getcoloringpages.com/coloring/96888
  • Crayons or markers
  • Glue (liquid glue and a glue stick)
  • One piece of thin cardboard cut from cereal box, or one piece of heavy cardstock or poster board
  • Sparkly things for treasure:
    • Sequins
    • Sparkly confetti
    • Craft “bling”
    • Coins cut or punched from shiny paper or foil— shiny gift bags and tags work great!
    • Jewelry or crowns—make from sparkly pipe cleaners, shiny narrow cord or ribbon, shiny paper or craft bling

INSTRUCTIONS:

  1. Print the pirate coloring sheet
  2. Color the picture and write Books “RRRR” Me Treasure! near the top of the page
  3. Glue cardboard or cardstock on the back of the picture for extra support
  4. Using glue, add sparkly items for treasure

Watch this storytime at: https://youtu.be/qIVYeIzjeT0

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KidsMake: Magnetic Tracks

Take and Makes for this project will be available starting this Friday, Sept. 18, 2020 at PPLD Libraries and are recommended for kids, ages 5-12.

Supplies:

  • Paper or paper plate
  • Markers or crayons
  • Glue or glue dot or 2-sided tape
  • Magnet
  • Craft stick

Directions:

  1. Use the provided paper or your own supplies to draw a shape to race around on your magnet track. You might choose a vehicle (car, truck, train, boat, etc.), an animal (cow, fish, turtle, dog, etc.), or something entirely different. It should be small enough to go on your paper plate (less than 2 inches).
  2. Attach a magnet to the back using double-sided tape or a glue dot.
  3. Use your own markers, crayons, or colored pencils to create a course on your race track.
  4. Use double-sided tape or a glue to to attach a magnet to the end of your craft stick. Before you glue, you need to make sure that the magnet on the car and the magnet on the stick attract rather than repel each other. If they repel each other, turn the magnet for the stick over before attaching.
  5. Test your track! Set your shape (vehicle, animal, or other) on your track. Use the magnet on the craft stick under the plate to move and race the car.

Have fun!

Find the tutorial video at https://ppld.librarymarket.com/virtual-kidsmake-magnetic-race-tracks

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STEM: Solar Science

Supplies:

In Take and Make kit (pick up a kit starting 9/11/20 at any PPLD Library, while supplies last)

  • UV beads
  • Pipe cleaner
  • Paper plate
  • Pencil
  • Black construction paper
  • Template pdf below

You supply:

  • Glue
  • Scissors
  • Clock face template (pdf to print below)
  • Natural objects from outside: rocks, weeds, flowers, leaves, etc.

Directions:

  1. UV beads illustrate some of the harmful effects of the sun and therefore, why we use sunscreen. UV light is one type of light from the sun. We can’t see it, but insects and birds can. While this UV light can help our bodies produce Vitamin D, too much of it can also cause sunburn or skin damage. Take the UV beads in your kit and string them on a pipe cleaner to make a bracelet. Go outside to watch them react to the UV rays – even on a cloudy day. You might also want to experiment with sunscreen, sunglasses, or windows and see what happens!
  2. You can also use the power of the sun, construction paper, and natural objects to create a work of art. Take your piece of paper and place it in a sunny place. You may need to weight it down. Place natural objects on the paper and leave it all in the sun for several hours. The UV rays of the sun help break down the dye in the paper creating your design. We found that we had to tape down some of the objects so they didn’t blow away. If you use tape, be careful that it doesn’t show.
  3. Next, you can make a sundial clock. Decorate the plate if you’d like. Cut out and glue the clock face to the back side of the plate. Poke the pencil through the center of the plate and take it outside. You’ll need to place the clock with the “12” facing north to determine the correct time. Watch how your clock tells time during the day.

These activities are based on:

http://solar-center.stanford.edu/activities/UVBeads/UV-Bead-Instructions...

https://www.scholastic.com/parents/school-success/learning-toolkit-blog/...

https://www.raisingarizonakids.com/2015/06/how-to-make-sundial-clock/

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Water Balloon Parachute

TAKE AND MAKE: Water Balloon Parachute
Can your water balloons survive a big drop? Find out with this experiment.
Pick up your Take and Make kit at PPLD Libraries starting September 4, 2020

Supplies:

  • One balloon
  • Water
  • One plastic shopping bag
  • One rubber band

Directions:

  1. Add water to your balloon, don't fill the balloon, leave lots of room to tie the balloon closed.
  2. Cut the ends of the handles of the bags. Tie or rubber band them to the knotted end of a water balloon.
  3. Go outside and drop it from a high place to see if it breaks when it lands.
  4. Test and retest until your balloon breaks.
  5. Try it again with another balloon.

See what else you can attach to your parachute and let drop.

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Tween Twist: Banned Books Wearables (Mini-Charms)

Link to tutorial on YouTube: https://youtu.be/vJyL_xqPI0E

Supplies needed:

  • Book template printed on cardstock
  • Book cover printed on paper
  • Glue Stick
  • Blank paper
  • Needle & thread
  • Jump ring
  • Optional: Key chain ring or necklace chord

Directions:

  1. Cut out a cardstock book template and the book cover of your choice (see pdf files below).
  2. Use the glue stick to glue the cover to the book template.
  3. Crease the flaps around the edges.
  4. Cut out 4-6 rectangles that you will fold in half to make the book’s pages. You can eyeball this, but they will be approximately 4.75 cm x 3.5 cm.
  5. Line up the pages and fold in half. This stack of folded pages is called a “signature”. Trim if necessary so that the pages fit in the book.
  6. Thread a needle with about 6 inches of thread.
  7. Sew the pages together with a pamphlet stitch. You will be poking 3 holes in the crease of the folded pages: one in the top, one in the middle, and one in the bottom. You can mark these holes with pencil beforehand if you would like to.
  8. Start by poking the needle in through the middle of the crease (see picture). The needle should go through the back of the pages and come out inside the inner fold. Leave a couple of inches of thread hanging out the back. Hold these 3 inches while you sew and do not let them pull through. You will be tying a knot with them at the end.
  9. Push the needle up through the top of the pages (inside to outside).
  10. Go back down near the bottom of the pages (outside to inside).
  11. Pull the needle one last time through the center hole.
  12. Use the thread you left hanging out the back and the thread still on the needle to tie a square knot—right over left, then left over right.
  13. Flip the cover template over, line up the pages of the signature you’ve just sewn, and use a glue stick to glue the leftmost and rightmost pages of the signature to the inside of the template.
  14. Run your glue stick over all the tabs of the cover template and then press them onto the two glued pages until the folio is fully secured to the cover template on both sides.
  15. Fold both sides of the spine with your fingers to finish your book!
  16. Now use the needle to poke a hole through the top of the spine all the way through to the inside. Widen the hole by wiggling the needle.
  17. Open a jump ring with your fingers by holding it in front of you and pulling one side forward while you push the other back. Do not open by pulling the sides outward or it will not fully close.
  18. Poke the jump ring through the hole you’ve created. You may have to go back and widen the hole further. At this point, you can attach a key ring to it or string it on a chord to make a necklace. Close the jump ring when you’re done!
  19. Voila! You have a miniature book charm. If you want it to lay flat, you can place it under a light object/between two objects overnight to make it stay fully closed. You could optionally paint it with mod podge to keep it safe from wear and tear!

Show off what you've made by entering our PPLD Challenge: Banned Books Art.

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Kids STEM: Density Burrito

Supplies:

  • Tall, clear glass cylinder vase or container (preferably straight)
  • Food coloring
  • Measuring cup
  • Order of liquids needed for this density "burrito" (but you could do less liquid choices, but make sure to start with a heavy liquid and end with the lightest liquid):
    • Honey
    • Corn Syrup (add a couple drops of food coloring)
    • Maple Syrup
    • Whole Milk
    • Dish Soap
    • Water (add a couple drops of food coloring)
    • Vegetable Oil (add a couple drops of food coloring)
    • Rubbing Alcohol (add a couple drops of food coloring)
    • Lamp Oil (DO NOT add food coloring to this liquid - it's doesn't mix in.)
  • Tray
  • Turkey Baster
  • Items to sink or float: ping-pong ball, plastic beads, metal bolt, grape or cherry tomato, etc.

Directions:

  1. Determine how many ounces your container holds with room to spare at the top. Round up or down to a number that can easily be divided your number of liquid layers. Measure the exact amount of liquid ingredients into separate containers. (My large container held about 32 oz. leaving room at the top, so I divided 32 by 9, and then rounded the number down to a 1/3 c. of each liquid to make it easy to measure. Have a grown-up help you, especially with the lamp oil.)
  2. Place the large container on the tray.
  3. Add the liquids IN ORDER (they go from most dense to least dense).
  4. Starting with the honey, pour it very slowly so that it doesn't touch the sides of the container.
  5. Next, very slowly, dribble the corn syrup on top of the honey. Don't let it touch the sides of the container either.
  6. Again like the first two, slowly dribble the maple syrup into the container on top of the corn syrup.
  7. Using the turkey baster, add the milk very slowly. Now it helps to pour the liquids slowly down the sides of the container as you add them. You will add the next five liquids in the same manner.
  8. When all the liquids are in place. Add items and watch them sink or float or get stuck, depending on their weight and the density of the liquid where it stops.

Watch this project at: https://youtu.be/QjEYa6xBVRQ?list=PLMEg2Dd0dSFctLfDQxsL5SmuE8zkwQFmu

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Kids MAKE: Ninja Warriors


Supplies:


  • 3 chenille stems for each figure
  • 1 wooden bead big enough to be the head – 5/8 to 3/4 inch
  • 1 or 2 regular-sized colored plastic drinking straws for each figure
  • 5 pony beads for each figure
  • Small wire cutters
  • Scissors
  • Ruler
  • Permanent markers for the face
  • Glue
  • Optional: Yarn, extra chenille stems, felt scraps, or other decorative items


Directions:

  1. Take one of the chenille stems and twist it around the other two about 2/3 of the way up; twist about three times, or enough so that they will not unwind. (See #1 picture below)
  2. Slide 3 pony beads over both of the “legs” up to the twist you made.
  3. With the permanent marker, draw a face on the bead; then slide the bead down over the middle two stems.(See #2 picture)
  4. Cut off some of the excess stem above the bead, but leave enough to coil it into a bun. Use a little glue to glue the bun flat to the “head.” (Alternate method: Cut several strands of yarn for hair and twist the excess stem over it to hold it in place.)
  5. With the scissors, snip eight sections of colored straw about 1 ¼ inches long.
  6. Slide two of the sections over the “arms.” Twist the part of the stem that is sticking out to form mitten-type hands with thumbs. Tuck the excess stem back into the straw. (See #3 and #4 pictures)
  7. Slide a section of the straw over each “leg;” add a pony bead, and then the other section of straw. Form the part of the stem that is sticking out into a big foot so your figure can stand up. Tuck the excess stem back into the straw.
  8. If you want, you can decorate your figure with extra chenille stems, felt, yarn, or whatever you happen to have. You can make warriors, princesses, superheroes, knights – anything you want! (See #5 picture)
ninja 1
ninja 2
ninja 3
ninja 4
ninja 5

Watch this project at: https://youtu.be/UnGxbypCuBw?list=PLMEg2Dd0dSFctLfDQxsL5SmuE8zkwQFmu

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All Pikes Peak Makes

Explore the world of making this October with All Pikes Peak Makes! Due to COVID-19, this event is going virtual for 2020!

A maker is someone who creates - to be innovative, to solve problems, to bring something beautiful into the world, or simply to have fun. They have an idea and they bring it to life. Making can encompass just about anything, from high tech to low tech to no tech, from art to fabrication to artistic fabrication, from needles to table saws to software.

Celebrate making with us!

These events are in partnership with Cool Science.

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Kids STEM: Bubble Magic

Supplies:

For solution:

  • Clean container, big enough to hold your solution
  • Distilled water (tap water will work but distilled water is best)
  • Dishwashing liquid like Dawn
  • Glycerin
  • White sugar

For Bubble cube:

  • 7 pipe cleaners, cut in half
  • 12 plastic straws, each one cut to fit a pipe cleaner half, with about ¼-½” of pipe cleaner left exposed at each end
  • For the bubble blower, you’ll need a plastic pipette. Just snip ½” off the bulb end of the
    pipette. This is the end you’ll dip into the bubble solution.

Directions:

  1. Start with a clean container that will hold as much solution as you plan to make.
  2. Add distilled water (tap water can be substituted, but the minerals in it will affect the bubbles), in 1 cup increments.
  3. For each cup of distilled water, add 2 Tbsp of dishwashing liquid (original Dawn works really well).
  4. For each cup of distilled water, add 1 Tbsp of glycerin (grocery story grade, or pharmaceutical grade).
  5. For each cup of distilled water, add 1 tsp of white sugar.
  6. Gently stir the ingredients in the container, being careful not to make it frothy and bubbly.
  7. Cover the container and place it in the refrigerator overnight.

Meanwhile... make a bubble cube and a bubble blower for your Bubble Magic …

  1. Twist 3 of the pipe cleaner halves together at one end to make a triangular, pyramid-shaped component. Use 12 of the pipe cleaner halves to make a total of 4 of these three-legged pieces.
  2. Slide a piece of straw onto each pipe cleaner leg, leaving ¼-½”” sticking out of the open end.
  3. To build the cube, twist each pipe cleaner end on one component to the ends on another component. Continue connecting the legs until the cube is complete. Try to make the shape as even as possible.
  4. Use the last two pieces of pipe cleaner for handles by twisting each piece onto the cube at opposite corners. Curve the “handle” ends to make a shape that you can easily hold onto.

Now to make Bubble Magic …

  1. Get the cold bubble solution from the refrigerator, and carefully stir the mixture. Avoid making froth and bubbles. Whenever that forms on the top, take a minute to skim it off with a spoon so that you’ll get better bubbles with your cube.
  2. Dip your cube into the solution, letting it sit there for a few seconds, and lift it out by holding on to the two handles. Gently shake the cube so that the soap film can even itself out and excess solution can drip back into your container.
  3. Gently shake the cube again so that you can see a new shape, with a “square” bubble in the center. Be sure the “square” is horizontal so that you can see the square when you look down into the cube from above it.
  4. Set the cube gently on a flat surface to keep the bubble film stable while you prepare a bubble with your pipette bubble blower, or ask a friend to blow a bubble with the pipette.
  5. Blow a pipette bubble and gently drop it right into the center of the square. And ...

TA-DAH! The round bubble you dropped into the cube “magically” turned into a bulging cube … a square bubble. Now that’s Bubble Magic!
*You can also use your bubble cube as a wand. Submerse it in the solution, lift it out carefully, and holding the handles, “pull” it through the air. Watch for a trail of connected spherical shapes!

Watch this project at : https://youtu.be/iY_0gSND-40?list=PLMEg2Dd0dSFctLfDQxsL5SmuE8zkwQFmu

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Kids Make: Black Glue Butterflies

Supplies:

  • A piece of 8 ½ X 11 white cardstock
  • Watercolor paints
  • School glue
  • Small bottle of black acrylic craft paint
  • Small paintbrush
  • Cup of water for rinsing your paintbrush

Directions:

  1. Print the half butterfly image provided (see below) onto your cardstock. Fold the cardstock exactly in half and then unfold to make a crease in the middle. (Alternate method: Draw a butterfly picture onto half of your cardstock with a pencil putting the exact middle of the butterfly on the crease.)
  2. Make black glue by adding black acrylic craft paint to a small bottle of plain school glue until a dark, black color is achieved. Mix well.
  3. Using the tip of the glue nozzle, trace a fine line of glue onto all of the printed lines of the butterfly picture. Don’t use too much glue! Put the glue on only the half of the picture with the copied lines. Leave the other half blank.
  4. Fold the paper in half again while the glue is wet and press together gently. Then open up the cardstock. The pattern you traced will now be duplicated on the other half of the cardstock.
  5. Let the glue dry. You can speed up the process by using a blow dryer on low heat to gently dry the glue.
  6. When the glue is completely dry, use your watercolors to color in all of the white sections. You can decide which colors to use!

Oops! My butterfly isn’t exactly the same on both sides. That’s okay! Real butterflies’ wings aren’t exactly the same on both sides, either! Just like with people’s faces, one side is slightly different than the other.

Watch this project at: https://youtu.be/Gimm3roL-3Q

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Kids STEM: Firefly Jar

Supplies:

  • Clean, clear jar with lid
  • Thin glow stick
  • Scissors
  • Table covering or tray
  • Glitter (optional)

Directions:

  1. With a grown-up's help, cut the tip off the glow stick.
  2. Place the open end of the glow stick in the jar and shake it back and forth so that it splatters. Turn the jar as you splatter.
  3. Add a small pinch of glitter, sprinkling onto the sides of the jar where the splatters are.
  4. Cover with lid and take into a very dark room.

Fireflies are not flies but beetles and do exist in Colorado! They hang out by permanent water sources like ponds, lakes, and streams.

Watch this project at: https://youtu.be/LRNWJVQRFYw

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Kids Make: Sewing and Embroidering Fun

Supplies:

  • Embroidery or regular thread
  • Piece of cotton fabric or item made of cotton
  • Sewing needle
  • Scissors
  • Sharpie or other dark marker

Directions:

  1. Using a sharpie, mark dots on your fabric which will guide you as you sew your design.
  2. Thread your needle by pushing thread through the eye of the needle. Make a knot at the end of your piece of thread.
  3. Start on the wrong side of your fabric or on the inside of your item, and push the needle up through the fabric through your starting dot. Bring all the thread through, slowly, making sure the thread doesn't tangle.
  4. Go to the next dot in your design and push the needle down through that dot, bringing all the thread through again.
  5. Continue until your first design is complete. Finish your design by weaving your needle through the thread on the wrong side of the fabric several times, making a couple loops so the thread will be secure. Cut the thread.
  6. Re-thread for the next design or continue if you have enough thread on your needle.
  7. Enjoy your original design!

Watch this project at: https://youtu.be/5tX-0F2bAsA

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Kids STEM: Ice Volcanoes

Supplies:

  • Baking soda (1/3 c.)
  • Vinegar
  • Small bowl
  • Golf ball or other small ball that sinks and doesn't float
  • Tray
  • Paper towels
  • Warm water (1 cup)
  • Plastic wrap
  • Food coloring

Directions:

  1. Put a golf ball in a small bowl. Cover both the ball and bowl with plastic wrap, making sure the wrap hangs out over the edge. Push the plastic wrap down around the ball.
  2. Mix a third cup baking soda into one cup of warm water and add food coloring. Mix well.
  3. Pour the mixture into the small bowl and over and around the golf ball. Make sure you cover the ball with the baking soda/water mixture. You may need to spoon in some of the baking soda that sits at the bottom of the bowl of warm water.
  4. Place the bowl in a flat place in the freezer. Freeze for at least 4 hrs.
  5. When frozen solid, place the bowl in warm water so the ice comes loose. Place on a tray and lift the volcano out of the bowl. Pry out the golf ball with a spoon and carefully remove the plastic wrap.
  6. Spoon on some vinegar and watch the icy volcano. This project is fun to do outside.
  7. Refreeze your volcano for another day, if there's anything left.

Watch this video at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wo3tfS85M4k&list=PLMEg2Dd0dSFctLfDQxsL5S...

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Kids Make: Eric Carle Inspired Painted Collage Mobile

Supplies:

  • Tablecloth
  • Paints (any kind, or water colors could work too)
  • Paintbrushes (any kind)
  • Paint tray
  • Tissue paper or construction paper (three sheets of different colors or just white works too)
  • Cardboard
  • Glue or Mod Podge
  • Yarn or string
  • Scissors
  • Dowel(s) or a coat hanger or a branch with yarn or string tied on.
  • Scissors

Directions:

  1. Cover your workspace with a table cloth or newspaper.
  2. Spread out your tissue paper (or construction paper).
  3. Apply paint to the tissue paper in broad strokes, (no need to cover the entire tissue paper with wet paint.) After the first color is dry, add another color. Let dry again before adding another color. Add designs too, like swirls or zigzags. Let tissue paper dry.
  4. Take cardboard and draw large shapes like a star, crescent moon, square, circle, etc. Cut out the shapes.
  5. When tissue paper is dry, tear into smaller pieces (but not tiny pieces).
  6. Water down some glue or use Mod Podge to cover a cardboard piece, then place a piece of painted tissue paper onto the glued piece of cardboard. Trim any excess tissue paper. Paint glue over the tissue paper too. Repeat with several shapes and allow all pieces to dry.
  7. With a grown-up's help, poke a hole at one end of each cardboard shape. Using different lengths of string or yarn, string up your shapes.
  8. Hang your stringed shapes from your branch or dowel. If you're using two dowels, you can tie them together first by crossing them and tying string or yarn where they intersect.
  9. Adjust your hanging shapes along the dowel so that it's balanced when it hangs. Hang your mobile art up for all to admire.

Watch this project at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tl79U5s4GrA&list=PLMEg2Dd0dSFctLfDQxsL5S...

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