Mobile Library Services (MLS)

What's New!

Banned Books Week 2019

Censorship leaves us in the dark - Keep the Light On!

Come celebrate Banned Books Week at PPLD! Learn about:

  • National banned books from years past
  • Challenged books and media at your very own Library District
  • And events to shed light on the challenge of book censorship

The Top 10 (11) National List

The ALA Office for Intellectual Freedom tracked 347 challenges to library, school, and university materials and services in 2018. Of the 483 books challenged or banned in 2018, the Top 11 Most Challenged Books are:

  1. George by Alex Gino
    • Reasons: banned, challenged, and relocated because it was believed to encourage children to clear browser history and change their bodies using hormones, and for mentioning “dirty magazines,” describing male anatomy, “creating confusion,” and including a transgender character.
  2. banned books ala

  3. A Day in the Life of Marlon Bundo by Jill Twiss, illustrated by EG Keller
    • Reasons: banned and challenged for including LGBTQIA+ content, and for political and religious viewpoints.
  4. Captain Underpants series written and illustrated by Dav Pilkey
    • Reasons: series was challenged because it was perceived as encouraging disruptive behavior, while Captain Underpants and the Sensational Saga of Sir Stinks-A-Lot was challenged for including a same-sex couple.
  5. The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas
    • Reasons: banned and challenged because it was deemed “anti-cop,” and for profanity, drug use, and sexual references.
  6. Drama written and illustrated by Raina Telgemeier
    • Reasons: banned and challenged for including LGBTQIA+ characters and themes.
  7. Thirteen Reasons Why by Jay Asher
    • Reasons: banned, challenged, and restricted for addressing teen suicide.
  8. This One Summer by Mariko Tamaki, illustrated by Jillian Tamaki
    • Reasons: banned and challenged for profanity, sexual references, and certain illustrations.
  9. Skippyjon Jones series written and illustrated by Judy Schachner
    • Reason: challenged for depicting stereotypes of Mexican culture.
  10. The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian by Sherman Alexie
    • Reasons: banned and challenged for sexual references, profanity, violence, gambling, and underage drinking, and for its religious viewpoint.
  11. This Day in June by Gayle E. Pitman, illustrated by Kristyna Litten
    • Reason: challenged and burned for including LGBTQIA+ content.
  12. Two Boys Kissing by David Levithan
    • Reason: challenged and burned for including LGBTQIA+ content.

Challenges at PPLD
Since the 70's PPLD has had 310 challenges to books, magazines, movies, and other media. Many of these you may no longer find in our Catalog but we assure you, it was not because they were challenged. Over the years, as media has shifted more to digital platforms, we simply cannot carry everything!
banned books ppld

  1. Don’t Call Me Little Bunny by Gregoire Solotareff
    • Reasons: violence, gangs (5 challenges)
    • Summary: (1987) Jack, the Little Bunny, doesn't like being called that and he doesn't think being the smallest rabbit is much fun, either. Why can't he be a normal rabbit with a normal name just like everyone else?
  2. Gay Ideas: Outing and Other Controversies by Richard Mohr
    • Reasons: Homosexuality (5 challenges)
    • Summary: (1992) Philosopher Richard Mohr's articulate exposition of the moral dilemmas facing the gay community, Gay Ideas, addresses, in diverse and often shocking ways, how gays ought to represent and position themselves in the face of an increasingly threatening climate of homophobia, repression, and violence. Includes 36 illustrations.
  3. Miss America by Howard Stern
    • Reasons: Sexually explicit (4 challenges)
    • Summary: (1995) Shock-jock radio host Howard Stern shares his own offbeat, outrageous views, and offensive observations on life, the world, modern American society—and more.
  4. The Anarchist Cookbook by William Powell
    • Reasons: Drugs, alcohol, smoking, violence (3 challenges)
    • Summary: (1971) Contains instructions for the manufacture of explosives, rudimentary telecommunications phreaking devices, and related weapons, as well as instructions for home manufacturing of illicit drugs, including LSD.
  5. Animalia by Graeme Base
    • Reasons: occult/satanism (2 challenges)
    • Summary: (1993) A noted artist presents an imaginative, whimsical journey through the letters of the alphabet, in a beautifully illustrated book that introduces a menagerie of familiar and exotic creatures.
  6. banned books chart

  7. Aperture Magazine
    • Reasons: Nudity, sexually explicit (2 challenges)
    • Summary: (1952) Based in New York City, is an international quarterly journal specializing in photography. Aperture magazine is the flagship publication of Aperture Foundation.
  8. The Bear and the Fly by Paula Winter
    • Reasons: Unsuited for age group, violence (2 challenges)
    • Summary: (1976) A bear tries to catch a fly with disastrous results.
  9. Glory Hole Murders by Tony Fennelly
    • Reasons: Offensive language, homosexuality (2 challenges)
    • Summary: (1985) The gay, New Orleans aristocrat, Matt Sinclair, solves a murder of a supposedly straight family man in the men's room of a gay bar.
  10. Grandpa's Witched Up Christmas by James Flora
    • Reasons: Unsuitable for age group (2 challenges)
    • Summary: (2018) When Grandpa was a boy, the most terrible thing happened to him the day before Christmas. While taking a shortcut through the woods, he met three fearsome witches. One, with sharp teeth and hair like an un-mowed lawn, pointed her finger at him, squealed, "Sha-zam!" and turned him into a snake. The second witch, who didn't have any feet, turned him into a turkey buzzard. And the third-tall and warty-screamed, "Ta-pooty!" and changed him into a pig. Home he ran, but his parents wouldn't let him in.
  11. banned books chart

  12. I Wish I had a Pirate Suit by Pamela Allen
    • Reasons: Nudity (2 challenges)
    • Summary: (1991) When Peter wears his pirate suit, his little brother had better beware--because Peter is the captain and his little brother is the crew. But there's one thing for little brother to look forward to, and that's the day Peter outgrows his pirate suit . . . and his galley slave becomes captain. Full-color illustrations.
  13. Lost in the Store by Larry Bograd
    • Reasons: Unsuitable for age group (2 challenges)
    • Summary: (1981) Bruno is worried when he becomes separated from his parents in a large department store, until he meets Molly, who shows him the joys of being lost.
  14. Lucy Dove by Janice Del Negro
    • Reasons: Occult/satanism (2 challenges)
    • Summary: (2001) While sewing the laird's trews by moonlight in a haunted churchyard in return for a sackful of gold, an aging seamstress outwits a terrible monster.
  15. Secrets, Spells, & Curious Charms by Monika Beisner
    • Reasons: Occult/satanism (2 challenges)
    • Summary: (1985) This illustrated compilation of rhyming spells, chants, and incantations draws on traditional lore from around the world.
  16. Sweet Movie by Maran Film
    • Reasons: Sexually explicit (2 challenges)
    • Summary: (1974) The winner (Carole Laure) of the Miss World Virginity contest marries, escapes from her masochistic husband, and ends up involved in a world of debauchery.
  17. Who Framed Roger Rabbit? by Steven Spielberg
    • Reasons: Unsuited for age group, sexually explicit (2 challenges)
    • Summary: (1988) Down-on-his-luck private eye Eddie Valiant gets hired by cartoon producer R.K. Maroon to investigate an adultery scandal involving Jessica Rabbit, the sultry wife of Maroon's biggest star, Roger Rabbit. But when Marvin Acme, Jessica's alleged paramour and the owner of Toontown, is found murdered, the villainous Judge Doom vows to catch and destroy Roger.
  18. The Boy Who Ate Around by Henrik Drescher
    • Reasons: Unsuited for age group (2 challenges)
    • Summary: (1994) After Mo refuses to eat his supper of cheese souffle and string beans, he turns into a ferocious monster and eats his parents. He then proceeds to eat everything--everything but the cheese souffle and string beans. Mo transforms himself into increasingly monstrous monsters as he eats his way through his home and neighborhood, the country, the world, until he is left hanging from the moon.



Virtual Read-Out
Your words have power. Stand up to censorship and declare your literary freedoms by reading from a banned book or discussing censorship issues on camera!
Click here for more information!


Banned Book Weeks Events:
Some events require registration.

Comments: 0

The Friends of the Pikes Peak Library District is hiring for the position Volunteer Coordinator. The Friends of the Pikes Peak Library District Volunteer Coordinator is responsible for the day to day operation of the Regional Library Book Stores. The Volunteer Coordinator, an ex officio member of the Friends Board of Directors, manages the operations for the Regional Library Bookstores and special book sales including volunteers. This person serves as the Friends liaison with PPLD personnel and outside vendors.

Please see the attached files for more information.

Comments: 0

Pikes Peak Library District is conducting a community needs assessment across El Paso County, and we want to hear from you!


At least through Sept. 30, patrons can share feedback about their library experience. When you visit the library, ask a librarian how you can leave us your feedback!


The survey is optional, and responses will be anonymous and confidential.

Comments: 0
Call for Art

The call for art is an event that happens a couple of times a year in order to gather artists to show in PPLD's galleries around the district. This fall will be a combination of digital submissions and a physical drop-off, pick-up day. This is the first time that we will be accepting digital submissions.

  • When: Fri., Sept. 27, submission drop-off 10 a.m – 1 p.m. Pick-up 4 – 6 p.m.
  • Where: Library 21c Venue, 1175 Chapel Hills Dr.

This Call is going to be a combination of digital submissions and a day of physical drop-offs and pick-ups.

The Pikes Peak Library District Art Evaluation Committee will be reviewing art for future 1 - 2 month shows by individual artists. Bring 5 pieces of art in show ready format (matted, framed, and wired). Please bring a completed Art Exhibit Application to submissions drop off (below).

PPLD is now accepting digital submission. Please fill out the electronic form and attach five pictures of representative art.

Digital submissions will be accepted Sept. 27 – Oct. 4.

If you have any questions, please contact Ben Dahlby at bdahlby@ppld.org or (719) 531-6333, x6325

Comments: 0
YALSA's Teens' Top Ten

The Teens' Top Ten is a "teen choice" list, where teens nominate and choose their favorite books of the previous year. Nominations are posted on the Thursday of National Library Week, and teens across the country vote on their favorite titles. Readers ages 12 - 18 can vote online between August 15 - October 15, 2019. The winners will be announced October 16.

Click here to vote now!

Comments: 0
Bumps, Books, 'n Babies

PPLD invites you to participate in our 1st Annual Bumps, Books, ‘n Babies Resource Fair!

  • When: Sat., Sept. 28 from 1:30 - 4:30 p.m.
  • Where: Library 21c, 1175 Chapel Hills Dr.

Parents of babies and those who are expecting or trying to conceive:

Connect with local resources and services that make the parenting journey easier and give babies a bright beginning! This FREE event featuring local exhibitors representing pregnancy, baby, and parenting focused community groups and organizations from a variety of sectors, including wellness, safety, early literacy, parenting groups, and more!

Ask professionals your baby-related questions and get giveaways!

There will be lots more fun to be had, including a maternity/family photo shoot with the Library 21C Studio green screen, mini massages, Q&A Panels and presentations on a variety of topics, and mini programs too!

  • Baby Story Times with baby massage lessons
  • Prenatal Yoga
  • Baby & Me Yoga
  • DIY Baby Toys Craft Station
  • Babywearing Dance Party!
  • Baby Talk: Language, Learning, & Literacy
  • Baby Care: Wellness Q&A
  • Pregnancy & Childbirth Q&A
  • Mama Care: Postpartum Q&A
  • Diapering & the Alternatives

Photo Shoot
Click here for photo shoot information.

  • When: Sat., Sept. 28 from 1 - 5 p.m.
  • Where: Studio 21c, 1175 Chapel Hills Dr.

We are partnering with Rocky Mountain Children's Health Foundation’s Best Start Program to provide FREE Colorado baby boxes to new and expecting parents! Baby boxes give babies up to six months of age a safe place to sleep while under parental supervision. Inside each box is a firm mattress and an organic cotton sheet.

Watch the online syllabus and register today to reserve your FREE Best Start Program baby box and pick it up at the Bumps, Books, ‘n Babies Resource Fair: Click here.


2019 Vendors

  1. Bright by Three
  2. Alliance for Kids
  3. Beginnings Birth Center
  4. BabywearingCOS
  5. Henry's Heart Art Therapy
  6. WoW Family Chiropractic
  7. Active Chiropractic Wellness Center
  8. Bundle Baby (cloth diapers)
  9. Love is Photography LLC
  10. East Winds Acupuncture
  11. Child Safe Childproofing
  12. Sound Beginnings with Gabby Seeger
  13. FIT4MOM Colorado Springs
  14. Music Lingua
  15. CPCD...giving children a head start
  16. Usborne Books & More
  17. Organic Homebirth
  18. La Leche League of Colorado Springs
  19. Rocky Mountain Children's Health Foundation
  20. Mindful Springs Counseling - Perinatal Wellness Program
  21. Go Diaper Free of Colorado Springs
  22. LoveSleepThrive Consulting
  23. Avery and Ivy's Apothecary
  24. SafeCare Colorado
  25. Hike it Baby
  26. Thrivent Financial - Child ID
  27. Catholic Charities / Family Connections
  28. Preparing for Birth
  29. Pikes Peak Lactation
  30. Brianna Towne (nutrition & corrective exercise)
  31. The Resource Exchange
  32. Jennie Sides (Birth Boot Camp)
  33. Peak Vista Women's Health
  34. Major Organizers
  35. East Winds Acupuncture
  36. Breathe Correct
  37. Lindsay Smith - Child Passenger Safety Technician
  38. Donna's Dolphins Swim School
  39. Into Loving Arms Hypnobirthing
  40. Discovery Toys
  41. Alysia Loerch Photography
  42.  

    Click here for vendor application form.

     

Comments: 2
All Pikes Peak Reads 2019

Pikes Peak Library District is pleased to announce the selected titles for All Pikes Peak Reads 2019!

All Pikes Peak Reads is Pikes Peak Library District's annual program geared towards improving literacy and fostering dialogue across social, cultural, and generational lines. Each year, we select APPR titles that focus on a variety of timely topics and coincide with our planned community-wide programming. This year, our titles explore themes of crossings, peace, multiculturalism, identity, friendship, and memory.




Our selected adult title is TransAtlantic by Colum McCann.
TransAtlantic
Summary: A tale spanning 150 years and two continents re-imagines the peace efforts of democracy champion Frederick Douglass, Senator George Mitchell and World War I airmen John Alcock and Teddy Brown through the experiences of four generations of women from a matriarchal clan.

About the author: Colum McCann is the author of six novels and three collections of stories. Born and raised in Dublin, Ireland, he has been the recipient of many international honours, including the National Book Award, the International Dublin Impac Prize, a Chevalier des Arts et Lettres from the French government, election to the Irish arts academy, several European awards, the 2010 Best Foreign Novel Award in China, and an Oscar nomination. In 2017 he was elected to the American Academy of Arts. His work has been published in over 40 languages. He is the co-founder of the non-profit global story exchange organisation, Narrative 4, and he teaches at the MFA program in Hunter College. He lives in New York with his wife, Allison, and their three children.


Author presentation and book signing: Click Here!


We have also selected a book of poetry, Citizen Illegal by Jose Olivarez.
Citizen Illegal
Summary: Citizen Illegal is right on time, bringing both empathy and searing critique to the fore as a nation debates the very humanity of the people who built it." —Eve Ewing, author of Electric ArchesIn this stunning debut, poet José Olivarez explores the stories, contradictions, joys, and sorrows that embody life in the spaces between Mexico and America. He paints vivid portraits of good kids, bad kids, families clinging to hope, life after the steel mills, gentrifying barrios, and everything in between. Drawing on the rich traditions of Latinx and Chicago writers like Sandra Cisneros and Gwendolyn Brooks, Olivarez creates a home out of life in the in-between. Combining wry humor with potent emotional force, Olivarez takes on complex issues of race, ethnicity, gender, class, and immigration using an everyday language that invites the reader in.

About the author: José Olivarez is the son of Mexican immigrants. His debut book of poems, Citizen Illegal, was a finalist for the PEN/ Jean Stein Award and a winner of the 2018 Chicago Review of Books Poetry Prize. It was named a top book of 2018 by NPR and the New York Public Library. Along with Felicia Chavez and Willie Perdomo, he is co-editing the forthcoming anthology, The BreakBeat Poets Vol. 4: LatiNEXT. He is the co-host of the poetry podcast, The Poetry Gods and a recipient of fellowships from CantoMundo, Poets House, the Bronx Council on the Arts, the Poetry Foundation, & the Conversation Literary Festival. His work has been featured in The New York Times, The Paris Review, and elsewhere. In 2018, he was awarded the first annual Author and Artist in Justice Award from the Phillips Brooks House Association and named a Debut Poet of 2018 by Poets & Writers.


Author presentation and book signing!

  • When: Thu., Nov. 7, from 7 - 9 p.m.
  • Where: Penrose Library, 20 N. Cascade Ave.



Our young adult and children’s title is Nowhere Boy by Katherine Marsh.
Nowhere Boy
Summary: Fourteen-year-old Ahmed, a Syrian refugee, and thirteen-year-old Max, an American boy, are bound by a secret that sets them on the adventure of a lifetime

About the author: Katherine Marsh is an author of books for children and young adults including Nowhere Boy, which is being published in over a dozen languages; The Night Tourist, winner of the Edgar Award for Best Juvenile Mystery; Jepp, Who Defied the Stars, a New York Times Notable; and The Door By The Staircase, a Junior Library Guild selection. A former journalist and managing editor of The New Republic, Katherine spent three years in Brussels, Belgium with her family and flock of chickens. She now lives in Washington, DC with her husband, two children, two cats and three chickens.


Author presentation: Click Here!

  • When: Thu., Oct. 24, from 7 - 8 p.m.
  • Where: Library 21c Venue, 1175 Chapel Hills Dr.



This fall we will again present a variety of programs to the community including author visits, film screenings, community discussions and panel presentations, theater productions, workshops, music programs, and more. We will be undertaking many of these with our community partners.

Click here for program information.

Comments: 2

Pikes Peak Library District is pleased to announce the winners of the 2019 Jean Ciavonne Poetry Contest for Children:

Colin Bevan - "Bahamas"
Mayah Bolenbaugh - "The Essence of Warmth"
Eva Goroski - "Bioluminescent Beach at Night"
Brody Karr - "Papayalulu Paradise"
Sally Peterson - "The Mystical Land"
Jana Yuschalk - "Darkling Dwabidisador"


Bahamas
By Colin Bevan

Fisherman rip tonight’s dinner from the ocean
Bloody hands filet the dead fish
Smells of fresh fish turns my head
Salt fills the air rusting old boats
Charcoal beach fires cook todays catch
Warm water surrounds my feet
Small birds run from the waves
Boats dot the horizon for miles
Paradise, I hope I never leave


The Essence of Warmth
By Mayah Bolenbaugh

Firewood receives the spark
Steam rises from the bread, fresh from the oven
Soft snuggle from a purring kitten
Sip a large mug of cider under a changing tree in the fall
Enter a cabin to kick off winter’s freeze
Submerge in hot springs as the snowflakes dance
Comfort and serenity, as the shower pours through your hair
Earth is nourished by the elements
Now the sand takes in the sun
The day’s last hour bathed in dark orange sunshine on a summer’s day


Bioluminescent Beach at Night
By Eva Goroski

Twilight creeps up the coast
Waiting for the moon to come with a gleam
Shells adorn the beach like jewels
Stars twinkle and glimmer like diamonds
Tide pools shine with a radiant beam
The ocean has an eerie glow
Bioluminescent dinoflagellates show off in a chain of lights


Papayalulu Paradise
By Brody Karr

I dream of a land called Papayalulu
It’s a tasty paradise for me and you-you
It’s hard to get to - this is true-true
First you must make a papaya canoe-noe
Row your canoe-noe to the end of the sea
And soon Papayalulu you will see

As papaya trees sway in the papayamint breeze
You can paddle down to the Papaya Juice River with ease
You can even lean over and take a sip
But better take care - your canoe-noe might tip
Look out! What’s that I hear?
It’s Papaya Juice Falls - better stay clear!

Safe at last upon the shore
What’s that sound I cant ignore?
It’s the singing papaya birds high in the trees
A song so sweet my ears it does please
I think I’ll stay a while in this land
Papayalulu is oh so grand!


The Mystical Land
By Sally Peterson

I know a place, not far away
It glistens and it gleams.
I go there every time I sleep
It’s called the “Land of Dreams.”

So when I sleep I don’t count sheep
Or toss and turn in vain.
I just fly to the “Land of Dreams”
In my one-man twinbed plane.

Each night I fly right out the door
And pass the moon and sun.
I’m going to the “Land of Dreams”
To have some dream like fun.

And when I land on snow white sand
A lovely sight I see.
A wondrous civilization is
Stretched out in front of me.

A mountain looms above you
If you look to the west.
On the east there is a river
And a town where you can rest.

There are bubbles in the air
That are floating in the breeze.
You can smell the scent of honey,
And hear the rustling trees.

Then my views were interrupted
By a woman clad in white.
She was the noble Queen
Of this land of truth and right.

“Welcome” she said. “Welcome
Won’t you come to my estate”
And she pointed to a castle
With a shiny marble gate.

“Of course” I said, “how gracious,
How could I refuse?”
We started towards the castle
And she told me all the news.

We walked into the town
Where the buildings stand so tall.
Everything is vibrant
From the big to really small.

The people there wear brilliant robes
Of many different hues.
There are feathers on their hats
And feathers on their shoes.

Aromas that are new
Are wafting towards my face.
I wonder what the food is like
In this amazing place.

We came to a kiosk
Where a man was selling food.
The food was shaped like balls
Some were red and some were blue.

They tasted sweet and juicy,
And suddenly I knew!
They were little berries,
And in the fields they grew.

A woman selling flowers
Gave me a bouquet.
It smelled just like sweet roses
In my wildflower spray.

The red flowers were the largest.
The blue flowers were large, too.
The yellow flowers were tiny.
My favorites were the blue.

We entered a cute clothes shop
Filled with rows of silk,
They were soft and they were comfy,
And smooth and cool like milk.

I chose a robe with red, blue, and yellow
For they would match my blooms.
I got nice shoes and a fine new hat
With fluffy little plumes.

Next we went to a pet shop
And saw a little dog.
He was not like mine at all, though.
My dog is brown like a log.

But this dog had new colors.
This dog was so bright!
So were all the other dogs.
It was a crazy sight!

I thought the cats were normal
Until I heard them speak.
They spoke such perfect English
I fought the urge to shriek!

A bird screeched in the background
And I turned in surprise.
The bird that was behind me
Had creepy human eyes.

The castle was our last stop
And it was getting late.
I was getting pretty tired
When I walked up to the gate.

The gates were swiftly opened.
We ran to a bench and sat.
It was nice to calmly sit there
And hear the robins chat.

Said the Queen “Oh heaven help us.
The feasts about to start”
We raced inside the castle
And I couldn't calm my heart.

I changed my clothes and entered
The room of the great feast.
There were many fruits and veggies
And for meat they had roast beast.

Many fancy people
Were invited here to dine.
Some were very famous.
All were very fine.

They all told me hello
Then sat and ate and ate.
I listened to their stories
As I cleaned off my plate.

A toast was to be done.
I lifted my cup.
Then “beep” went my alarm clock
And quickly I woke up.


Darkling Dwabidisador
By Jana Yuschalk

To bed I went on that ordinary night,
Not knowing in the morning what I may fight.
I woke up on a pile of hay,
Wondering what would fill my day.
Surprised and frightened, I immediately felt.
Suddenly, I wished I could just melt.
It seemed so sunny without any rain.
Smells of sweat hovered over the plain,
From jumping creatures who seemed insane.
The so-called “Dwabis” had a mane.
No animals were there.
Not even a bear.
I was informed, this was Dwabidisador.
Wow, I really need to study by geography more!
The Dwabi’s legs were awfully long.
They jumped then fell, I am not wrong.
The sound of jumping pounded the ground.
Their favorite hobby was jumping. That I found.
The language they spoke was also Dwabidisador.
At least I don’t need to study my languages much more!
“Dwabi fell down,” they said over and over again.
“English without pronouns,” I thought. Until then,
A young Dwabi who was probably only four,
Came up and said, “Why don’t you enter that door.”
I did as he commanded only to find,
A Dwabi whose name was Filabind.
He bought me a cupcake with sprinkles on top,
The smell was so sweet I thought I would pop!
All that was better than the taste, was the smell.
It looked and smelled like sweet caramel.
The taste was Dwabilicious.
Red velvet without mush.
After I finished my delectable cupcake,
I was sure Dwabidisador wasn't fake.
Then we departed and walked a long ways.
We entered a place called “Dwabi’s Good Maze”.
Since Filabind was my guide, he led me through,
A portal that said, “How do you do?”
Filled with wonder and awe, I heard a loud, “MOO!”
Before I knew it, I was back home on our farm.
Lying in my bed was my noisy alarm,
Trying to wake me up from my-dream?
What it was, it filled me with gleam!

Comments: 0

The Teen Art Contest is for teens and by teens. Teens create the art, and teens determine the winners.

The theme for our 2019 Teen Art Contest was "Opposites Attract! "

All of the artwork will be displayed at either Penrose Library, East Library, or Library 21c during the month of April.

Here are this years winners, which you can also view below!

Best In Show
“Poseidon’s Goldfish” by Cole R.

High School - First Place
“Opposites Attract” by Isaiah R.

High School - Second Place
“A Spectrum” by Preston S.

Middle School - First Place
“Steamy” by Teddy K.

Middle School - Second Place
“Concrete Jungle” by Ava K.

Coordinator’s Choice - High School
“Calm Before the Storm” by Lydia M.

Coordinator’s Choice - Middle School
“Strong and Courageous” by Chloe H.

You can view the winners here:

Teen Art Contest 2019 Winners

Comments: 0

Pikes Peak Library District sparks development, opportunity, and inspiration for everyone across El Paso County. Whether you've got a young one who's learning to read, or you're a lifelong learner looking for a new skill, the library has something for you.

We are excited to share stories of how the Library positively impacts the lives of our patrons.

To tell your story, click here to take our short survey or use the hashtag #shareyourspark on Facebook, Twitter, or Instagram.

INSPIRATION

PPLD sparks inspiration. In this video, hear Price Strobidge's story about how the library helped him become Poet Laureate of the Pikes Peak Region.

OPPORTUNITY

PPLD sparks your opportunity. In this video, hear Allan's story about how the Library helped him improve his English language skills and provide him with GED test preparation. Read more about Allan's personal growth and development through the Library in this article from The Gazette.

DEVELOPMENT

PPLD sparks your development. In this video, learn about how our children's areas are free, safe places that encourage development and growth.

Stay tuned to learn how PPLD can spark your opportunity and your inspiration.

Comments: 0

Have you heard about auto-renewals? Beginning Mon., Feb. 11, PPLD will save you the step of renewing your checkouts.

The day before items are due, the library’s system will automatically renew them if there are no holds and they haven’t already been renewed twice.

There are some exceptions to the materials that can be automatically renewed, including:

  • Rapid Read, Rapid View
  • eBooks, eAudios
  • Equipment
  • Interlibrary Loans

Patrons will receive an email notice letting them know what, if anything, was renewed as well as the new due date.

Comments: 10

Overdue books? Fear not. Pikes Peak Library District will no longer charge you for being a little bit late on your returns.

The library will officially eliminate overdue fines Fri., Feb. 1, just in time for a county-wide celebration of Library Lover’s Month. Patrons will no longer be financially penalized for books that are late in returning to the library.

“Our mission as an organization is to eliminate barriers to information and resources, not create them,” said Director of Library Services Tim Blevins. “We had a trial run of eliminating overdue fines and didn’t see longer hold times for patrons, but did see a positive impact on borrowing. It makes perfect sense for us to permanently eliminate these fines.”

Fines, Blevins says, are particularly prohibitive for the community’s most vulnerable families. Plus, overdue fines accounted for less than one percent of the library’s overall revenue in 2017.

There will still be fees assessed for lost or damaged materials. Materials are considered lost if they are 21 days overdue.

Additionally, Pikes Peak Library District will roll out automatic renewals later on in Library Lover’s Month. The day before books are due, the library’s system will automatically renew them up to two times, so long as no other patron placed a hold on the material.

There are some exceptions to the materials that can be automatically renewed, like rapid reads, e-materials, and equipment checkouts.

“What we’ve seen here, and in library facilities across the country, is that by taking these steps to increase ease of access to materials, use of library resources and checkouts is positively impacted,” Blevins said. “We’re here to help people access the resources they need to achieve their goals. This is just one more way for us to do a better job of achieving that mission.”

Comments: 3

We want to celebrate your successes! Pikes Peak Library District is looking for stories about how our resources and staff have helped enrich minds, fuel learning and growth, spark imagination and ideas, build community and connections, and/or achieve goals.

To tell your story, click here and take our short survey.

Comments: 9

The 2018 Teen Fiction Anthology is here!

Click the link below to read the award winning stories from the 2018 Teen Fiction Writing Contest.

Comments: 0

The Teen Art Contest is for teens and by teens. Teens create the art, and teens determine the winners.

The theme for our 2018 Teen Art Contest was "Hidden Beauty." Teens were encouraged to show us where they have found hidden beauty in the ordinary, everyday world.

All of the artwork will be displayed at either Penrose Library, East Library, or Library 21c during the month of April.

Here are the winners!

Best In Show
Clear by Isabella Huhn

High School - First Place
Letting Go by Celine Hanlon

High School - Second Place
Masked by Elizabeth Ward

Middle School - First Place
Beauty Is in the Eye of the Beholder by Connor Murdock

Middle School - Second Place
Beauty of the Mountain by Adyline Poirson

Coordinator’s Choice - High School
Color through Clutter by Rebecca Gearhart

Coordinator’s Choice - Middle School
A Shoe by Adia Byron

You can view the winners here:
Teen Art Contest 2018 Winners

Comments: 0
Repair Café Volunteers Needed

PPLD's Repair Café is in need of BIKE fixers! Fill out a volunteer application at ppld.org/repair-cafe or stop by your local library!

Repair Café is a neighborhood initiative that promotes repair as an alternative to tossing things out. At a Repair Café you’ll find the tools and materials needed to repair your broken items, as well as knowledgeable volunteers who will show you how to do it. Repair Trainers will offer a diagnosis and suggested remedy for broken items, repairing items when possible and otherwise explaining what parts you may need to obtain to complete the repair.

Comments: 0
Best Workplaces 2017

At an awards ceremony on Mon., Nov. 27, 2017 at the Antlers hotel, Pikes Peak Library District was named Best Workplace by The Gazette in the Extra Large Company (300+ employees) category.

According to The Gazette, PPLD "ranked high among its employees in social responsibility, providing meaningful work, confidence in leadership, being a place workers would recommend to others for employment and operating with strong values and ethics."

Here is a video The Gazette created, which was shown at the ceremony.

Comments: 4

Congratulations to the winners of our first All Pikes Peak Writes, PPLD's adult fiction writing contest. You can read the winning entries by clicking here.

1st Place
"I Don't Blame Him for Dying" bu Andrew Beasley

2nd Place
"Puddle" by Andrea Malcom

3rd Place
"The Photograph" by Jacqueline Peveto

Honorable Mention
"Apostrophe" by Ariane Peveto

Honorable Mention
"Dr. Luckwood" by Jill Long

Comments: 0

The Teen Art Contest is for teens and by teens. Teens create the art, and teens determine the winners.

The theme for our 2017 Teen Art Show & Contest was Transformation Teens were encouraged to show us how art impacts your life, or how it transforms the world around you.

All of the artwork will be displayed at either Penrose Library, East Library, or Library 21c during the month of April. Questions? Contact Becca Phillipsen at (719) 531-6333, x6336 or rphillipsen@ppld.org.

Here are the winners!

Best in Show

"Mirror Reflection" by Aleyah B.

High School

1st Place: "My Fantasy" by Elizabeth W.
2nd Place: "Summer Sunsets" by Kaylee T.
Coordinator’s Choice: "Hands of Time" by Mary R.

Middle School

1st Place: "Transportation through Time" by Liberty H.
2nd Place: "Evolution" by Mikayla R.
Coordinator’s Choice: "Coy Fish Pond" by Kristine B.

You can view the winning works here:

2017 Teen Art Contest Winners

Comments: 1
Check Out Colorado Backpack

Reserve your free State Parks Pass and Backpack today by clicking here!

This program is a partnership with the Colorado Department of Education, State Library, local library systems, and Colorado Parks and Wildlife. It is meant to encourage Coloradans to visit our State Parks and experience all of the great outdoor recreation that this state has to offer.

Each backpack, which checks out for one week, includes:

  • State park pass hang tag for the rear-view mirror
  • Guide to Your 42 State Parks
  • Binoculars
  • Leave No Trace™ card
  • Colorado Wildlife Guide
  • Activity ideas list
  • Colorado Trees and Wildflower Guide
  • Fishing Basics tip sheet
  • Program evaluation card

Click here for more information about this program.

Comments: 14

Beginning Jan. 9, 2017, PPLD will no longer charge fines on overdue children and teen items. Removing overdue fines will provide greater opportunity for children and teens to use the full range of library services. Currently, 15% of children and teen cardholders are blocked from checking out items at the library due to overdue fines.

Also, overdue fines on DVDs and games will be reduced from 25 cents per day to 10 cents per day.

PPLD seeks to foster literacy and life-long learning for children and teens. The Library regularly evaluates policies to see what barriers for service exist and evaluates how to eliminate such barriers. The Library’s Board of Trustees approved the new policy at their December meeting.

Items that will not accrue overdue fines must be designated as “juvenile” or “teen” in the Library catalog. The policy will take effect for any items checked out January 9 or after. Lost item and damage fees will still apply.

Overdue notices will still be sent as reminders to return Library items. Items not returned within 21 days of the due date will be considered lost, and the full cost of the item will be charged to the patron’s account.

Click here for more information

Comments: 11

Have you read a really great (or really bad) book lately? Tell us all about it! Just fill out this book review form and your review will be posted in the Book Reviews section of ppld.org.

Happy reviewing!

Comments: 5

After 15 years and 272,236 miles of service to the residents of El Paso County, Mobile Library 698 will be leaving tomorrow to serve another library district in Southern Colorado. Happy trails, old friend!
Mobile Library 698

Mobile Library 698

Comments: 1