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Community Conversation: Voting

Community Conversations at Pikes Peak Library District is a new series of monthly events that invites the public to discuss current events and issues impacting the Pikes Peak region. We want to promote civil dialogue and greater understanding of different perspectives.

Voting

Watch Now!

In collaboration with the Council of Neighbors and Organizations (CONO), please join us for a panel discussion on the importance of voting and the voting process.

No registration required.

Panelists include:

  • Shelly Roehrs – League of Women Voters
  • Joy Garscadden – Citizens Project
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Kids MAKE: Ninja Warriors


Supplies:


  • 3 chenille stems for each figure
  • 1 wooden bead big enough to be the head – 5/8 to 3/4 inch
  • 1 or 2 regular-sized colored plastic drinking straws for each figure
  • 5 pony beads for each figure
  • Small wire cutters
  • Scissors
  • Ruler
  • Permanent markers for the face
  • Glue
  • Optional: Yarn, extra chenille stems, felt scraps, or other decorative items


Directions:

  1. Take one of the chenille stems and twist it around the other two about 2/3 of the way up; twist about three times, or enough so that they will not unwind. (See #1 picture below)
  2. Slide 3 pony beads over both of the “legs” up to the twist you made.
  3. With the permanent marker, draw a face on the bead; then slide the bead down over the middle two stems.(See #2 picture)
  4. Cut off some of the excess stem above the bead, but leave enough to coil it into a bun. Use a little glue to glue the bun flat to the “head.” (Alternate method: Cut several strands of yarn for hair and twist the excess stem over it to hold it in place.)
  5. With the scissors, snip eight sections of colored straw about 1 ¼ inches long.
  6. Slide two of the sections over the “arms.” Twist the part of the stem that is sticking out to form mitten-type hands with thumbs. Tuck the excess stem back into the straw. (See #3 and #4 pictures)
  7. Slide a section of the straw over each “leg;” add a pony bead, and then the other section of straw. Form the part of the stem that is sticking out into a big foot so your figure can stand up. Tuck the excess stem back into the straw.
  8. If you want, you can decorate your figure with extra chenille stems, felt, yarn, or whatever you happen to have. You can make warriors, princesses, superheroes, knights – anything you want! (See #5 picture)
ninja 1
ninja 2
ninja 3
ninja 4
ninja 5

Watch this project at: https://youtu.be/UnGxbypCuBw?list=PLMEg2Dd0dSFctLfDQxsL5SmuE8zkwQFmu

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All Pikes Peak Makes

Explore the world of making this October with All Pikes Peak Makes! Due to COVID-19, this event is going virtual for 2020!

A maker is someone who creates - to be innovative, to solve problems, to bring something beautiful into the world, or simply to have fun. They have an idea and they bring it to life. Making can encompass just about anything, from high tech to low tech to no tech, from art to fabrication to artistic fabrication, from needles to table saws to software.

Celebrate making with us!

These events are in partnership with Cool Science.

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Kids STEM: Bubble Magic

Supplies:

For solution:

  • Clean container, big enough to hold your solution
  • Distilled water (tap water will work but distilled water is best)
  • Dishwashing liquid like Dawn
  • Glycerin
  • White sugar

For Bubble cube:

  • 7 pipe cleaners, cut in half
  • 12 plastic straws, each one cut to fit a pipe cleaner half, with about ¼-½” of pipe cleaner left exposed at each end
  • For the bubble blower, you’ll need a plastic pipette. Just snip ½” off the bulb end of the
    pipette. This is the end you’ll dip into the bubble solution.

Directions:

  1. Start with a clean container that will hold as much solution as you plan to make.
  2. Add distilled water (tap water can be substituted, but the minerals in it will affect the bubbles), in 1 cup increments.
  3. For each cup of distilled water, add 2 Tbsp of dishwashing liquid (original Dawn works really well).
  4. For each cup of distilled water, add 1 Tbsp of glycerin (grocery story grade, or pharmaceutical grade).
  5. For each cup of distilled water, add 1 tsp of white sugar.
  6. Gently stir the ingredients in the container, being careful not to make it frothy and bubbly.
  7. Cover the container and place it in the refrigerator overnight.

Meanwhile... make a bubble cube and a bubble blower for your Bubble Magic …

  1. Twist 3 of the pipe cleaner halves together at one end to make a triangular, pyramid-shaped component. Use 12 of the pipe cleaner halves to make a total of 4 of these three-legged pieces.
  2. Slide a piece of straw onto each pipe cleaner leg, leaving ¼-½”” sticking out of the open end.
  3. To build the cube, twist each pipe cleaner end on one component to the ends on another component. Continue connecting the legs until the cube is complete. Try to make the shape as even as possible.
  4. Use the last two pieces of pipe cleaner for handles by twisting each piece onto the cube at opposite corners. Curve the “handle” ends to make a shape that you can easily hold onto.

Now to make Bubble Magic …

  1. Get the cold bubble solution from the refrigerator, and carefully stir the mixture. Avoid making froth and bubbles. Whenever that forms on the top, take a minute to skim it off with a spoon so that you’ll get better bubbles with your cube.
  2. Dip your cube into the solution, letting it sit there for a few seconds, and lift it out by holding on to the two handles. Gently shake the cube so that the soap film can even itself out and excess solution can drip back into your container.
  3. Gently shake the cube again so that you can see a new shape, with a “square” bubble in the center. Be sure the “square” is horizontal so that you can see the square when you look down into the cube from above it.
  4. Set the cube gently on a flat surface to keep the bubble film stable while you prepare a bubble with your pipette bubble blower, or ask a friend to blow a bubble with the pipette.
  5. Blow a pipette bubble and gently drop it right into the center of the square. And ...

TA-DAH! The round bubble you dropped into the cube “magically” turned into a bulging cube … a square bubble. Now that’s Bubble Magic!
*You can also use your bubble cube as a wand. Submerse it in the solution, lift it out carefully, and holding the handles, “pull” it through the air. Watch for a trail of connected spherical shapes!

Watch this project at : https://youtu.be/iY_0gSND-40?list=PLMEg2Dd0dSFctLfDQxsL5SmuE8zkwQFmu

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Kids Make: Black Glue Butterflies

Supplies:

  • A piece of 8 ½ X 11 white cardstock
  • Watercolor paints
  • School glue
  • Small bottle of black acrylic craft paint
  • Small paintbrush
  • Cup of water for rinsing your paintbrush

Directions:

  1. Print the half butterfly image provided (see below) onto your cardstock. Fold the cardstock exactly in half and then unfold to make a crease in the middle. (Alternate method: Draw a butterfly picture onto half of your cardstock with a pencil putting the exact middle of the butterfly on the crease.)
  2. Make black glue by adding black acrylic craft paint to a small bottle of plain school glue until a dark, black color is achieved. Mix well.
  3. Using the tip of the glue nozzle, trace a fine line of glue onto all of the printed lines of the butterfly picture. Don’t use too much glue! Put the glue on only the half of the picture with the copied lines. Leave the other half blank.
  4. Fold the paper in half again while the glue is wet and press together gently. Then open up the cardstock. The pattern you traced will now be duplicated on the other half of the cardstock.
  5. Let the glue dry. You can speed up the process by using a blow dryer on low heat to gently dry the glue.
  6. When the glue is completely dry, use your watercolors to color in all of the white sections. You can decide which colors to use!

Oops! My butterfly isn’t exactly the same on both sides. That’s okay! Real butterflies’ wings aren’t exactly the same on both sides, either! Just like with people’s faces, one side is slightly different than the other.

Watch this project at: https://youtu.be/Gimm3roL-3Q

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Kids STEM: Firefly Jar

Supplies:

  • Clean, clear jar with lid
  • Thin glow stick
  • Scissors
  • Table covering or tray
  • Glitter (optional)

Directions:

  1. With a grown-up's help, cut the tip off the glow stick.
  2. Place the open end of the glow stick in the jar and shake it back and forth so that it splatters. Turn the jar as you splatter.
  3. Add a small pinch of glitter, sprinkling onto the sides of the jar where the splatters are.
  4. Cover with lid and take into a very dark room.

Fireflies are not flies but beetles and do exist in Colorado! They hang out by permanent water sources like ponds, lakes, and streams.

Watch this project at: https://youtu.be/LRNWJVQRFYw

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You have a voice! Today, all United States citizens can make their voices heard by voting in elections starting at age 18. But in the early years, only white men had suffrage – that means the right to vote. 2020 marks the 100th anniversary of the 19th Amendment of the Constitution, which guaranteed the vote to women as well. Many people worked hard to help secure suffrage rights. To learn more, check out these books for kids. Just click on the pdf link below:

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Kids Make: Sewing and Embroidering Fun

Supplies:

  • Embroidery or regular thread
  • Piece of cotton fabric or item made of cotton
  • Sewing needle
  • Scissors
  • Sharpie or other dark marker

Directions:

  1. Using a sharpie, mark dots on your fabric which will guide you as you sew your design.
  2. Thread your needle by pushing thread through the eye of the needle. Make a knot at the end of your piece of thread.
  3. Start on the wrong side of your fabric or on the inside of your item, and push the needle up through the fabric through your starting dot. Bring all the thread through, slowly, making sure the thread doesn't tangle.
  4. Go to the next dot in your design and push the needle down through that dot, bringing all the thread through again.
  5. Continue until your first design is complete. Finish your design by weaving your needle through the thread on the wrong side of the fabric several times, making a couple loops so the thread will be secure. Cut the thread.
  6. Re-thread for the next design or continue if you have enough thread on your needle.
  7. Enjoy your original design!

Watch this project at: https://youtu.be/5tX-0F2bAsA

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Kids STEM: Ice Volcanoes

Supplies:

  • Baking soda (1/3 c.)
  • Vinegar
  • Small bowl
  • Golf ball or other small ball that sinks and doesn't float
  • Tray
  • Paper towels
  • Warm water (1 cup)
  • Plastic wrap
  • Food coloring

Directions:

  1. Put a golf ball in a small bowl. Cover both the ball and bowl with plastic wrap, making sure the wrap hangs out over the edge. Push the plastic wrap down around the ball.
  2. Mix a third cup baking soda into one cup of warm water and add food coloring. Mix well.
  3. Pour the mixture into the small bowl and over and around the golf ball. Make sure you cover the ball with the baking soda/water mixture. You may need to spoon in some of the baking soda that sits at the bottom of the bowl of warm water.
  4. Place the bowl in a flat place in the freezer. Freeze for at least 4 hrs.
  5. When frozen solid, place the bowl in warm water so the ice comes loose. Place on a tray and lift the volcano out of the bowl. Pry out the golf ball with a spoon and carefully remove the plastic wrap.
  6. Spoon on some vinegar and watch the icy volcano. This project is fun to do outside.
  7. Refreeze your volcano for another day, if there's anything left.

Watch this video at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wo3tfS85M4k&list=PLMEg2Dd0dSFctLfDQxsL5S...

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Kids Make: Eric Carle Inspired Painted Collage Mobile

Supplies:

  • Tablecloth
  • Paints (any kind, or water colors could work too)
  • Paintbrushes (any kind)
  • Paint tray
  • Tissue paper or construction paper (three sheets of different colors or just white works too)
  • Cardboard
  • Glue or Mod Podge
  • Yarn or string
  • Scissors
  • Dowel(s) or a coat hanger or a branch with yarn or string tied on.
  • Scissors

Directions:

  1. Cover your workspace with a table cloth or newspaper.
  2. Spread out your tissue paper (or construction paper).
  3. Apply paint to the tissue paper in broad strokes, (no need to cover the entire tissue paper with wet paint.) After the first color is dry, add another color. Let dry again before adding another color. Add designs too, like swirls or zigzags. Let tissue paper dry.
  4. Take cardboard and draw large shapes like a star, crescent moon, square, circle, etc. Cut out the shapes.
  5. When tissue paper is dry, tear into smaller pieces (but not tiny pieces).
  6. Water down some glue or use Mod Podge to cover a cardboard piece, then place a piece of painted tissue paper onto the glued piece of cardboard. Trim any excess tissue paper. Paint glue over the tissue paper too. Repeat with several shapes and allow all pieces to dry.
  7. With a grown-up's help, poke a hole at one end of each cardboard shape. Using different lengths of string or yarn, string up your shapes.
  8. Hang your stringed shapes from your branch or dowel. If you're using two dowels, you can tie them together first by crossing them and tying string or yarn where they intersect.
  9. Adjust your hanging shapes along the dowel so that it's balanced when it hangs. Hang your mobile art up for all to admire.

Watch this project at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tl79U5s4GrA&list=PLMEg2Dd0dSFctLfDQxsL5S...

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Pikes Peak Library District Foundation Named in $2 Million Dollar Bequest

Pikes Peak Library District Foundation is honored to receive $150,000 from the estate of Milt and Darlene Johnson.

As we have come to learn, Milt was what we at PPLD would refer to as a “power user.” While serving as the pharmacist at Broadmoor Drug at The Broadmoor Hotel, Milt often worked the 4-11 p.m. shift. With Dar teaching during the day, Milt became a mainstay at our Penrose Library where he spent countless hours educating himself on investments and investment strategies, pouring over resources such as The Wall Street Journal, the Financial Times, and Barron’s.

After he retired, Milt continued to visit the library almost daily and used the knowledge he gained at the library to build and grow his and Darlene’s investment portfolio. In fact, Milt became such a subject matter expert that many of the investment advisors he and Darlene used often called Milt for advice. We are grateful to be a recipient of their generosity, which based on this story, is due in part to the time Milt spent at Penrose Library. PPLD’s mission is to provide resources and opportunities that impact individual lives and build community, and we cannot think of a more compelling story that demonstrates the impact of patrons connecting with library resources and in this case quite literally building our community.

PPLD and the PPLD Foundation are truly grateful to Darlene and Milt for including the library as part of the imprint these gifts will forever leave on our region, and we are deeply touched by Darlene’s gesture to make the gift to PPLD in Milt’s memory. The PPLD Foundation was created in 2003 to raise philanthropic funds and build an endowment to support our 15 libraries and the more than 650,000 people we serve. PPLD ranks 10th out of Colorado’s 13 largest library systems in funding per person, and the PPLD Foundation was created to accept meaningful, generous gifts like Darlene’s. It is donations large and small that helps PPLD close our funding gap and continue providing resources and opportunities that impact individual lives and build community. We are truly sorry to have lost Darlene and Milt, but these gifts will ensure their legacy is forever remembered.

Read more about the Johnsons and their estate in The Gazette's coverage here.

Photo credit: Joe Hollmann and the City of Colorado Springs


For more information on how you can include PPLD in your estate planning and create your own lasting legacy, contact Lance James at (719) 531-6333, x6890, or email foundation@ppld.org.

Learn more about the work of the PPLD Foundation.

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Glow Up & Show Up - It's Time to Vote!

Election Day is Tue., Nov. 3. PPLD encourages everyone to get out there and make your voice heard. Looking for information about ballot issues and candidates? Click here to get started.

  • Mailing in your vote? Ballots will begin to be mailed to households starting Fri., Oct. 9.
  • Don't forget to sign your ballot envelope before mailing it in! If you forget, or your signature does not match you will be contacted as follow up to assure the ballot was cast properly.
  • Voters can go to GoVoteColorado.com to check their ballot status, and even sign up for BallotTrax where voters can opt in to receive email, text, and/or phone updates of their ballot status.
  • Colorado’s voting model is considered the gold standard, and there are significant physical and cyber security measures in place to help identify voter fraud, including extensive signature verification. Colorado does prosecute for voter fraud.

Several library locations have ballot boxes and will act as Voter Service and Polling Centers!

Find a 24-Hour Secure Ballot Drop Box At:

  • East Library, 5550 N. Union Blvd., Colorado Springs, CO 80918
  • Library 21c, 1175 Chapel Hills Dr., Colorado Springs, CO 80920

Access a Voter Service and Polling Center from Fri., Oct. 30 - Tue., Nov. 3 at:

*Sand Creek Library will be closed except for curbside service from Fri., Oct. 30 - Tue., Nov. 3 to provide ample access to voters using the space.


Voting Resources

Want more information? Visit our voting resources page!


Register in Person:

There are four locations where you can register to vote in El Paso County. Click here to find the location nearest you.

It’s best to bring a driver’s license or Colorado ID, or to know the last four digits of your Social Security number. However, you do not need to bring any of these things with you!

Each location is open Monday - Friday, 8 a.m. - 5 p.m.
The Union Town Center Branch location is also open Saturday from 8 a.m. - 1 p.m.

You may also register to vote in person at Voter Service & Polling Centers through Election Day.


Where to vote?

In El Paso County, you can mail in your ballot, drop it off at a secure 24-hour drop box, or vote in person at a Voter Service and Polling Center (VSPC) (where you can also register to vote, update your registration, and drop off your mail ballot). East Library and Library 21c are both drop-off locations.

  • Mail Ballot: Every active, registered voter in Colorado receives a ballot in the mail. You must register within eight days of the election to receive a mailed ballot.
  • You can fill it out at home and drop it back in the mail with postage.
  • You can fill the ballot out and drop it at one of our several convenient secure 24-hour drop boxes throughout
    the county. Find the locations of these drop boxes here.
  • You can fill the ballot out and drop it off at any VSPC in the county. Find the locations of these VSPCs here.
  • If you lost your mailed ballot or did not receive one, you can vote in-person at any VSPC in the county.
  • Many VSPCs are open for several days prior to the election, so you can beat the Election Day line.
  • Find the locations, open dates, and hours of these VSPCs here.

Who can vote in Colorado?

  • U.S. Citizens
  • Individuals who are 17 years old if they will be 18 years old by election day (but 16 and 17-year-olds can preregister!).
  • People who have lived in Colorado for 22 days or more before election day.
  • People who are not in detention in a correctional facility, jail, or other facility for a felony conviction.
  • People who have finished their sentence for a felony conviction, including any parole, are eligible to vote.
  • If you are on probation or were convicted for a misdemeanor, you are eligible to vote.

Check out our Community Conversation on voting.

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Stroll-a-Story

Walk together and enjoy the benefits of a wonderful children’s book and some physical activity.

There’s an interesting story at each of our Library locations, waiting for you to read it.

Tag us on Facebook @PPLDKids and let us know what you think!

Are you ready? Let’s go!


Outside Strolls


Window Strolls

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Streaming History Series

In commemoration of Colorado History, join Regional History and Genealogy staff members as we view selected Rocky Mountain PBS Colorado Experience documentaries. Watch award-winning documentaries and chat about our state's unique history. Participants will learn about our state and community from the comfort of your home.

Register for one intriguing topic or the whole series. Click here to register for the whole series.

Registration is required.


Topics

Glen Eyrie Castle

  • Mon., Aug. 10 at 6:30 p.m.
  • Click here to register.

Enter the fascinating history of Colorado Springs’ founding estate. How did a refined English Tudor-style castle come to exist in the vast, unsettled West? Created by railroad tycoon and Civil War General William Jackson Palmer, Glen Eyrie Castle is adjacent to Garden of the Gods and the iconic views of Pikes Peak. Brand new archeological findings reveal intriguing details of castle life!


Ladies of the Mine

High altitude, groceries delivered by mule train, pack rats and spoiled Thanksgiving turkeys are just a few of the challenges faced by ladies living in Colorado's remote mining towns at the end of the 19th Century. Learn the stories of three inspirational women who held their own while surrounded by a harsh landscape and un-lady-like company.


Suffrage

On November 7, 1893, Colorado became the first state in the nation to grant women’s suffrage by a single issue popular vote, and the following year the first three female state legislators were elected. Meet the dedicated Colorado women that led this charge. Today, Colorado has the highest percentage of women in the state legislature.


KKK

From the Grand Dragon to known KKK appointees in the police, mayor and governor offices, Colorado once had the 2nd largest Ku Klux Klan membership in the United States. Discover the sordid history of the KKK in Colorado and the impact they had on Catholics, Jews and African Americans in early 1920s, and the courageous individuals who fought against their establishment.


Cheers to Beers!

The history of Colorado may best be seen through the bottom of a beer mug. From quenching the thirst of Gold Rush miners in the 1800's to modern craft brews pouring $3 billion into Colorado’s economy, beer has either borne witness to or helped create some of the most interesting chapters in the state’s history. Meet the pioneers of this now booming industry. Cheers!

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We hope you enjoy the 23rd edition of Stone Soup, published by the Adult Education Department of Pikes Peak Library District.

These stories are written by adult participants and volunteers. They are offered as submitted.

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Kids STEM:Hippopotamus Toothpaste

SUPPLIES AND INGREDIENTS:

  • ½ cup 49 Volume Hydrogen Peroxide (*3% solution, first aid quality, will work … it produces a smaller reaction)
  • 1 TBSP liquid dish soap
  • 1 packet (1 TBSP) Active Dry Yeast
  • 4 TBSP warm water
  • Plastic Cup for mixing yeast and water
  • Food coloring
  • Plastic soda bottle (*16 oz. - 1 liter)
  • Washable or protected work surface
  • Foil Tray with high sides and/or Larger cookie sheet or tray with sides
  • Funnel (optional)
  • *Safety goggles (*or … ski/snow goggles, swim goggles) … for general eye protection!

DIRECTIONS:

To make up a batch of hippopotamus toothpaste …

  1. Place the soda bottle in your tray(s) … on a washable, protected surface.
  2. Pour 150 ml (½ cup) of 40 Volume Hydrogen Peroxide into the soda bottle.
  3. (You might want to use a funnel for this!)

  4. Add 1 tablespoon of liquid dishwashing soap to the bottle.
  5. Pour the packet of yeast into the small cup.
  6. Pour 4 tablespoons of warm water over the yeast.
  7. Carefully swirl the cup around to further mix the yeast and water. *It should be the consistency of melted ice cream. Allow about 30 seconds. Add a bit more warm water, if needed.
  8. Dribble several stripes of food coloring down the inside of the soda bottle. This should produce stripes, just like you might see in real toothpaste.
  9. Pour the yeast solution into the soda bottle … and stand back! Watch the mixture expand and foam up.

*Once the chemical reaction is complete, you should have (mostly) just soapy water and yeast. However, if you used the Volume 40 product, and some of the peroxide was unreached in the experiment, it could irritate skin and eyes. For that reason, it’s
recommended that you don’t play with the foam! And DON’T BRUSH ANY TEETH WITH THIS FOAM!

How It Works …

Each tiny foam bubble in this chemical reaction is filled with oxygen. The yeast is a catalyst, a substance that speeds up a reaction. It quickly broke apart the oxygen from the hydrogen peroxide … and that created lots and lots of bubbles! Your experiment not only created bubbles, but also heat … that makes it an EXOTHERMIC reaction.

Clean Up …

It’s safe to use a sponge to wipe up foam from your table surface, and just wash the remaining liquid and foam from the bottle and tray down the sink drain.

Watch this project at: https://youtu.be/N91i9ih62ZM?list=PLMEg2Dd0dSFctLfDQxsL5SmuE8zkwQFmu

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LENA Start

LENA Start is a 10-week program where parents learn how to increase conversational turns with their babies and toddlers.

Wednesdays, Sept. 9 thru Nov. 11, 2020 from 6:30 - 7:30 p.m.


LENA device in vestHave you ever wondered how much you talk to your baby/toddler? Would you like to learn ways to increase talk and get your child ready for school?

This 10-week program will help parents, with children 0-32 months, increase conversational turns. Each week a child will wear a "talk pedometer" to track the number of adult words, conversational turns, and minutes of electronics they are exposed to. We will increase conversational turns by the end of the 10 weeks. We will meet weekly to give you tips on how to increase conversational turns and each parent will receive a free book each week! The child will receive a gift at graduation and three gift cards throughout the program!

Pre-registration is required. Click here to register!

For more information contact Melody Alvarez at malvarez@ppld.org.

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Kids Make: Watercolor Stained Glass


Supplies:

  • Watercolors
  • Cup of water
  • Paint brush
  • Pencil
  • Black crayon or oil pastel
  • White watercolor paper or heavy cardstock
  • Black cardstock or construction paper
  • White school glue
  • Glue stick
  • Optional: popsicle stick or toothpicks to spread glue


Directions:

Oil Pastel & Glue Watercolor Stained Glass

  1. Lightly draw a stained-glass design with pencil on your white paper.
  2. Outline the stained-glass design with black pastel or crayon.
  3. Working section by section, wet a section of your design with a paintbrush and plain water. Dab watercolor in that section. Feel free to mix colors.
  4. Repeat for each section of your design, wetting the paper first, before adding paint.
  5. Let your design dry.
  6. Outline each section of your design with glue, inside the black lines.
  7. Spread glue in each section.
  8. Let your project dry.
  9. Finished!

Collage-style Stained Glass

  1. You will need a sheet of black cardstock or construction paper to be the background of your final project.
  2. Lightly draw a stained-glass design with pencil on your white watercolor paper.
  3. Working section by section, wet a section of your design with a paintbrush and plain water. Dab watercolor in that section. Feel free to mix colors.
  4. Repeat for each section of your design, wetting the paper first, before adding paint.
  5. Let your design dry.
  6. Cut out each section of your design.
  7. Lay out your cutout pieces on the black paper.
  8. Once you like the arrangement, glue down each piece to the black paper with a glue stick.
  9. Finished!

Watch this project at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vu2UYBh1G3w&list=PLxg4vmuqrAtckvp9eurSGE...

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Kids STEM: Party Trick-in-a-Can

SUPPLIES:

  • Coffee or Oats Can (empty)
  • Thick Rubber Bands
  • Medium / Large Hex Nut
  • Paper Clips (Large and Small)
  • Nail / Hammer
  • Screwdriver
  • Tape
  • Pencil (*optional)
  • Colored paper, tape, and stickers for decoration (*optional)

DIRECTIONS:

  1. Poke a hole in the center of the coffee / oats can top and bottom using a hammer and nail.
  2. Enlarge the hole by tapping a screwdriver through the hole with a hammer.
  3. Tape your rubber band to the top of the large nut. Make sure it’s centered and very secure! (*Depending on the size of your can, you may need to knot two bands together so that there’s not too much tension on them.)
  4. Open up a small paper clip and thread it through one loop of the rubber band. This will be your “needle.”
  5. From the inside of the can, very carefully “thread” the paper clip (with the rubber band attached) through the hole in the bottom of the can. There may be sharp edges, so be careful! Slip a large paper clip through the rubber band loop to secure it in place. Remove the paper clip “needle.”
  6. Place the paper clip “needle” through the remaining loop of the rubber band and carefully pull it through the hole in the coffee / oats can lid. (If the hex nut has moved closer to one side of the rubber band, move it back so that it hangs on the center of the can when stretched.) (*If necessary, place the pencil between the lid and can to temporarily hold everything in place.)
  7. Slip another large paper clip through the rubber band loop to secure it in place. Remove the paper clip “needle” and the pencil. Make sure the lid is attached securely to the can!
  8. If you’d like, decorate your can with colored paper, tape, and stickers. Time for testing! On a flat, smooth surface, gently roll your can away from you. Just before it mysteriously begins to roll back, summon your super powers and call the can back to you. A little “hocus pocus” or “abracadabra” will convince your audience of the magic.

*Troubleshooting : Be sure to use thick rubber bands that will store up enough energy to cause the can to roll back to you. Also check that your hex nut is not touching the side of the can. If it is, use a shorter rubber band or knot your rubber band. If just one band is too short and tight, knot two rubber bands together. You can also thread an extra hex nut onto the outside top and bottom of the can as spacers if your rubber band(s) are too long. Experiment and you’ll get it just right.

Watch this project at: https://youtu.be/Hk1OthEqSfs

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Kids Make: Box Craft

Supplies:

  • Boxes
  • Paper
  • Any random materials – bottle caps, beads, egg cartons, cds, etc.
  • Scissors
  • Adhesive – glue, stickers, etc.

Directions:

Use these found, recycled items to make your own creation.

Watch this project at: https://youtu.be/Zc1PUl5WCSw

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Kids STEM: Rubber Band Paddle Boats

Supplies:

  • One plastic bottle along with its lid, about the size of a disposable water bottle (it can be a drink bottle, shampoo bottle, catsup bottle, mustard bottle, or any other clean, plastic bottle.) You can experiment with bottles of different shapes and sizes!
  • Two chopsticks, new pencils, sturdy skewers, or any other straight sticks of equal size; they must be long enough to fit at least halfway along the edge of your bottle and then hang off the end by 4 to 5 inches.
  • Thick foam board OR plastic carton(like a whipped cream tub or kitchen wipes container) OR two disposable plastic spoons
  • Rubber bands of different sizes
  • Duct tape or packing tape
  • Scissors
  • Paper
  • Ruler
  • Permanent marker

Directions:

  1. Line up your two sticks on opposite sides and along the length of your clean bottle; tape into place using the duct tape or packing tape (or use rubber bands if you have no tape.)
  2. Slide a rubber band over the ends of the sticks. Your rubber band should be taut without falling off but not so tight that it bends your sticks inward. If your rubber band is too big, try doubling it. It helps to loop the rubber band around each stick so it doesn’t fall off.
  3. Trace and cut a 2 inch X 3 inch template from the paper. Then use the paper template to trace 4 rectangles on the sides, bottom, or lid of a plastic container and cut them out.* The plastic should be soft enough to bend. Bend each piece in half; then use narrow pieces of duct tape to hold the pieces together with the curves flaring in opposite directions and all the bends in the middle.
  4. Slide your curved, taped plastic carton pieces or your taped spoons or your joined foam pieces between the sides of the rubber band. This is your paddle! At this point, you can tape the paddle to the rubber band.
  5. Try it out! You can sail your paddle boat in the bathtub, in a pond or quiet stream, or in a swimming or kiddie pool. Wind the paddle within the rubber band. Do it several times, but don’t wind it so much that it snaps. With the paddle still wound, set your boat gently in the water and let it go!

(Watch this project at: https://youtu.be/aFYJ9Aga7VY?list=PLxg4vmuqrAte4QgWzVQ7oInsSnnMkwcil)

* Caution: Some plastics become sharp when cut. Get an adult’s help if you need it!
Alternate method: Using a wire cutter or strong scissors, trim the handles of two plastic spoons so that they are 2 ½ inches long; use a narrow piece of duct tape to hold the spoons together along the short handle with one spoon facing up and one spoon facing down.
Second alternate method: Cut two 3 inch squares out of thick foam board and cut a slit just to the middle of each so that they can slide together.

The Science behind this Project:

The wound rubber band stores energy. The more you wind it the more energy is stored. The term for stored energy is “potential energy.” When you release the rubber band, the “potential energy” is converted into “kinetic energy,” or the energy of motion.

More experimentation:

Does the boat go faster or slower if the paddle is moved closer to the boat?
Does the boat go backwards if the paddle is wound in the other direction?
Does a big boat go faster or slower than a small boat?
When your boat is in the water, can you spot other forms of kinetic energy caused by the boat’s motion?
Can you think of other examples of potential and kinetic energy?

More ideas:

Make a balloon powered car
Make a rubber band helicopter

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High Prairie Library 10th Anniversary Harvest Festival

High Prairie Library is turning 10 and we are celebrating with our annual Harvest Festival!

High Prairie Library provides access to Pikes Peak Library District’s extensive collection, hosts a wide variety of programs for children and homeschool families, and holds events that celebrate their seed library. Our biggest event is the annual Harvest Festival, held on High Prairie Library’s grounds each fall.

Due to the Covid-19 Pandemic, the 10th Annual Harvest Festival has gone virtual! Thanks to the continued support from the Friends of the High Prairie Library, we have several events and activities for you to take part in!

In honor of our annual cookie competition and as part of our Anniversary, High Prairie Library is compiling an online cookbook: Harvest of Recipes - A Collection From the Falcon Community. We will be collecting YOUR recipes for our very own cookbook! Click here to submit your recipe and (optional) photo!

Everyone who submits at least one recipe will be entered in a prize drawing for one of four $10 Amazon gift cards!



Celebrate with us!

Bingo Card

Stop by to pick up your Bingo card today at High Prairie and help us celebrate our 10 year anniversary! Return your bingo card by Fri., Oct. 23 to be entered into a drawing for one of five $75 gift cards to Amazon. You can also print your card here!


Birthday Storytime

Happy 10th Birthday, High Prairie Library! Tune in to a special birthday storytime with Allison on Fri., Oct. 16. We’ll sing a song, read a book, and open a special party goodie bag. Grab your goodie bag starting Fri., Oct. 9. You can view this and other Storytimes as well as the rest of PPLD's virtual programming here.


Food Donation

Share Your Harvest! High Prairie Library is collecting donations for our local food pantry - Fresh Start Center. Fresh Start is looking for nonperishable food items to help keep hunger at bay right here in your local community. Our collection box will be available in the entryway from Thu., Oct. 1 to Sat., Oct. 31. Thanks for your support!


Mini Pumpkins Take and Make

Come by the High Prairie Library to pick up your mini pumpkin kit to decorate starting Fri., Oct. 2. Pumpkins and stickers will be provided for you and your family to decorate your pumpkin then you can get creative with what you have at home! Once your pumpkins are completed you can share your picture on social media using #PPLDHarvestFestival. Pumpkins available while supplies last.

Please note that all entries will be added to social media and some may be featured on our webpage.



Contests

Costume Contest

Time to dig out the crafting supplies and dust off those old clothes for donation for… High Prairie Library's Annual Costume Contest! We’ll be running a virtual contest this year for ages 0 - 18. Post a photo of your costume with a title or description on Facebook with #PPLDHarvestFestival and @ppldkids or @ppldteens. And then vote for your favorite! We’ll be selecting 2 winners from each age group this year: a popular choice and judges’ pick. All four winners will receive gift certificates to subscription boxes! Submissions are due by Fri., Oct. 23. Winners will be announced Mon., Oct. 26.

Please note that all entries will be added to social media and some may be featured on our webpage but you may email your photo to hi@ppld.org and we will post it to social media for you.


Fall Photo Contest

High Prairie Library is hosting a virtual Fall Photo contest for ages 18+ for our anniversary. Post your fall photo with a title or description on Facebook with #PPLDHarvestFestival and @ppld. And then vote for your favorite! We’ll be selecting 2 winners: our popular choice and judges’ pick. Winners will receive a $50 gift certificate. Submissions are due by Fri., Oct. 23. Winners will be announced Mon., Oct. 26.

Please note that all entries will be added to social media and some may be featured on our webpage but you may email your photo to hi@ppld.org and we will post it to social media for you.



History of High Prairie Library

High Prairie Library opened in 2010, bringing a permanent library facility to the Eastern Plains of Colorado while becoming a model for library sustainability.

Paid for in part by a U.S. Department of Transportation Congestion Mitigation Air Quality Improvement Program grant, the 6,000-square-foot building in Falcon contains many eco-friendly features.

“We have a geothermal pump, low flow plumbing fixtures, and large overhangs that reduce glare and solar heat gain in the summer, but also allow sunbeams in the winter,” explains High Prairie Library Manager Liz Willhoff. “The landscape was designed using native plants, and we have beautiful beetle kill pine inside.”

The Colorado Department of Public Health & Environment’s Environmental Leadership Program (ELP) has named High Prairie Library a Gold Partner! They achieved silver status last year, but have earned their gold status by creating an Environmental Management System (EMS). Their EMS helps High Prairie define their scope, set goals, track progress, and have accountability in their systems.

High Prairie Library: The Marriage of Beauty and Sustainable Design from PPLD TV on Vimeo.

The Library, located on land donated by Farmers State Bank, is also home to a garden and a seed library.

In addition to these sustainable features, High Prairie Library provides library service to residents of Falcon, Peterson Air Force Base, Banning Lewis Ranch, Black Forest, and the Eastern Plains. Despite the broad service area, “High Prairie has a close community feel and you often know your patrons by name,” says Willhoff.

Perhaps the Library’s greatest resource is its staff, which has become a vibrant team.

“Staff here feels more like a work family and everyone is very supportive,” says Willhoff. “Everyone has a strong work ethic and jumps in when and wherever needed.”

“Liz has done a really excellent job in engaging the High Prairie and Calhan communities,” adds Hillary Dodge, PPLD’s Director of the North Region. “She and her team attend a number of community events and meetings, and they are active in local schools and community organizations, as well. Not only are they trying to remind folks about their amazing neighborhood library, but they are also offering support and resources as library professionals.”

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Kids Make: Paper Sculptures that Pop!

Supplies:

  • 8 ½ x11” sheets of colored cardstock or heavyweight construction paper
  • Scissors
  • Colored dot stickers or other small stickers- optional
  • Scraps of colorful/decorative papers- optional
  • Hole punch
  • Glue stick

Directions:

  1. Fold an 8 ½ x 11” sheet of cardstock or heavy construction paper in half OR cut the sheet to a smaller size, then fold in half, making a strong crease on the fold line.
  2. Holding onto the folded side of your paper with one hand, give the top of your paper a decorative trim. Still holding the folded side with one hand, begin cutting 1” in from the open side, starting at the bottom of your paper. Let the outside edge guide your cutting line. STOP when you are about 1” from the top of your paper. Turn the corner with your scissors and cut across the paper, toward the fold. STOP about ¼” from the fold!
  3. Repeat the cutting from the bottom of your paper, always moving over about 1” from your previous cut before beginning. You can make your vertical and horizontal cuts straight or decorative. Making lines and curves, play around with each sculpture you create, giving your pieces some variety!
  4. When you have made 3-4 cutting lines, depending on the size of your paper, open up your paper and lay it on a flat surface. You can decorate your paper, front and back, using stickers or scraps of paper.
  5. Turn your paper into a 3-D sculpture with a few folds: Beginning on one side of your sculpture, fold the top “leg” TOWARD the center, creasing a new fold at the end of your scissor cut (where you stopped about ¼” from the main fold line). The next “leg” should be folded BACKWARD in the same manner. Continue, folding each leg ... front, back ... in this alternating pattern. Do the same thing on the other side, BUT the top “leg” will be folded backward. Continue the folding pattern ... front, back, front.
  6. Display your 3-D sculpture by working with the “legs” and folds to make it stand. Make a few more, varying the size of your paper, cutting lines, and decorations to grow your piece into an artistic stabile (a freestanding abstract sculpture) that POPS!

Watch this project at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NPxBwVPqYR4&list=PLxg4vmuqrAtckvp9eurSGE...

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Kids Stem: Paper Airplane Challenge

In this project, you make two different paper airplane designs and then test out each one to determine which one will fly the furthest.

Supplies:



  • Two pieces of paper for airplanes
  • Markers or crayons to decorate
  • Pencil and paper to record your results

Directions:

Plane Design #1- Classic Glider

  1. Fold your paper hot dog style.
  2. Lay the paper out in front of you, portrait style.
  3. Fold the top-right corner to the center crease, lining up the edges and creating a triangle.
  4. Do the same thing with the left corner.
  5. Fold the right side again, along the crease.
  6. Do the same thing with the left side.
  7. Fold the plane inwards, in half, so the previous folds are on the inside.
  8. Fold back one side so the edges align.
  9. Flip and repeat with the other wing.

Plane Design #2- Speed Glider

  1. Fold your paper hot dog style.
  2. Lay the paper out in front of you, portrait style.
  3. Fold the top-right corner to the center crease, lining up the edges and creating a triangle.
  4. Do the same thing with the left corner.
  5. Fold the point of the plane down, creating a fold along the bottom of the corner triangles. The tip should be about ⅓ of the page from the bottom of the paper.
  6. Fold the top-right corner to the center, about one inch above the tip.
  7. Repeat with the left corner. This should create a small triangle at the point.
  8. Fold the small triangle up.
  9. Flip your plane over so that your folds are on the table.
  10. Fold your plane in half, left side onto its right, so the edges line up.
  11. Fold the top wing down so your edges align.
  12. Flip and repeat with the other wing. Once you have completed your planes. Test them out in an open space, like your backyard or the park. Make a chart and compare each of your planes and how far it flew each time.

Watch these airplane projects at: https://youtu.be/QdronFgR0Yc?list=PLxg4vmuqrAte4QgWzVQ7oInsSnnMkwcil

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Kids Make: Pony Bead Animal Keychains

Supplies:

  • Pattern or picture of design
  • 4ft of craft lace
  • Key Ring
  • Scissors
  • Pony beads
    • 35 green
    • 15 blue
    • 6 yellow
    • 4 orange
    • 2 black

Directions:

  1. Tie your craft lace to your key ring, leaving two legs of equal length.
  2. Look at the top line of your pattern, and find pony beads to match that line. If you’re using the bird pattern, the first line will be 3 green beads.
  3. String those beads onto one of the legs of craft lace, in the order you see them on the pattern. (This may not matter for the first line, but it’s important later on!) Push the beads up to the top of the craft lace, next to the key ring.
  4. Now, string the other leg of craft lace through beads in the opposite direction of the first leg. Pull the craft lace all the way through. Reposition the line of beads so that they form the bottom side of a craft lace triangle, with the keyring as the triangle’s top corner. When you’re done, you should have to two equal lengths of craft lace again, one on either side of the line of beads.
  5. Repeat steps 2-4 with every line of your pattern.
  6. When you’re done, tie a knot in the craft lace at the bottom of your design, and trim any excess length. Good job!

Watch this project at: https://youtu.be/T6w5u62hrp0?list=PLxg4vmuqrAtckvp9eurSGEI2DwSb1wI6o

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