What's New!

Looking for a chapter book to listen to or read aloud with the family? Check out this selection of engaging chapter books in a variety of genres all available in electronic formats. Need help accessing these materials? Go to PPLD’s eLibrary to get started. Click on the pdf below to see the booklist.

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Cupboard Crafts & Experiments Part 2: Flip It Challenge

Supplies:

  • One piece of paper
  • 2 additional smaller pieces of paper to keep score
  • Marker pen
  • 2 pencils
  • 36 water bottle caps, marked with two different colors, one color on top, the other color on the bottom (Coins work well because they have two different sides already, heads and tails).

Directions:

  1. Draw a grid on the paper with the marker pen. Draw 6 spaces by 6 spaces for a total of 36 spaces on your paper.
  2. Put your names at the top of each of the smaller pieces of paper.
  3. To play:
    1. Put two of each players' markers onto the middle four squares of the grid. (We'll call the markers pink and green.)
    2. The first player adds a green marker to the board, placing it beside a pink marker that it has now "trapped" between two green markers. Flip the "trapped" pink marker to the green side. Score one point for each of your opponent's pieces that you are able to trap and flip each turn. The next player adds a pink marker to the board in the same way, "trapping" a green piece and flipping it to the pink side and scoring one for flipping one piece.
    3. Take turns and be sure to notice possible ways to trap your opponent's pieces either vertically, horizontally, or diagonally. As you get better at the game, you'll be able to trap multiple pieces in different directions. If you cannot find an opponent's piece to trap, you have to skip your turn.
  4. To score, either count up each player's points or count how many of each players' markers show when the grid is full.

You can watch this project at: You can watch this project at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kz38AUe91iQ

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Cupboard Crafts & Experiments Part 1: Tic-Tac-Toe

Supplies:

  • 10 water bottle caps (or any caps)
  • Elmer's glue
  • Yarn cut into 4 strands about 5" long
  • Square of cardboard cut from a cereal box
  • Stickers, optional

Directions:

  1. Cut a square size piece of cardboard.
  2. With glue, make two thin lines of glue vertically, and again, horizontally, keep the lines evenly spaced (see photo).
  3. Place one yarn strand on each glue line. Let dry. Trim yarn hanging off the edge of the cardboard.
  4. Mark five water bottle caps one way, and five caps another way. (Color the caps or attach the same sticker to five caps and a different sticker to the other five caps.)
  5. You are ready to play Tic-Tac-Toe!
  6. You can watch this project at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kz38AUe91iQ

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Cupboard Crafts & Experiments: Citrus Volcanoes

Supplies:

  • Any citrus fruit like a lemon, lime, or orange
  • knife with a parent or caregiver nearby
  • large tray or cookie sheet
  • baking soda
  • vinegar
  • lemon juice
  • dish soap
  • spoon or coffee stirrer
  • food coloring (optional)

Directions:

  1. Cut the tip off the fruit and then cut in half. Place on tray, sitting upright.
  2. Poke fruit with spoon or coffee stirrer to get juices flowing.
  3. Pour a little dish soap onto the fruit.
  4. Sprinkle baking soda onto the fruit.
  5. Squeeze drops of food coloring onto the fruit.
  6. Speed up the base/acid chemical reaction by adding drops of vinegar also!

You can watch this project at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MCL7lOrY5-s

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Cabinet Crafts & Experiments: Penny Spinners

Supplies:

  • cardboard
  • pencil
  • scissors
  • markers
  • scotch tape
  • white paper
  • a parent or caregiver nearby

Directions:

  1. Trace any size circle onto a piece of cardboard. Have your parent or caregiver cut out the circle if needed.
  2. Trace the round piece of cardboard onto the white paper. Cut out the paper circle.
  3. Draw a design onto the round piece of paper. A fun experiment is to use the three primary colors: red, blue, and yellow so you can see green, orange, and purple appear when you spin.
  4. Have your parent or caregiver cut a slit into the center of the cardboard circle and also the round paper. Tape your design onto the round piece of cardboard by making tape loops. You may also glue your paper onto the cardboard.
  5. Push a penny into the slit and spin!

You can watch this project at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wL4ZKcEDHkQ

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Using the Library Remotely

Last updated April 14, 2020

En español

Pikes Peak Library District is committed to providing Library resources and services to you during these unprecedented times. Thanks to the public’s investment and taxpayer support, we can continue to deliver access to information and opportunities that impact lives and build community across El Paso County.

While our physical locations remain temporarily closed until further notice, you can still use the Library remotely, with many resources available 24/7.

Here are some ways to get the most out of your virtual Library experience:

  • Check out our new virtual services! Our librarians are bringing their services to you, anywhere and anytime. Watch a virtual storytime with your kids, participate in a virtual book club, try a digital escape room, join us for a community movie discussion, do an at-home craft or experiment, and more. (Looking for something else to do? Bookmark the web page and check back often for new updates!)
  • Ask a librarian! You can also ask one of our reference librarian questions by phone, live chat, and email.
  • Download our mobile app to view your account, browse and download from our collection, and more. (Pro tip: There are also apps for Libby, OverDrive, Freegal, Kanopy, RBdigital, and more.)
  • Stream and/or download from our digital collection! There are so many options – digital books, audiobooks, comics, magazines, music, and videos – that you can access from almost anywhere.
  • Use our databases to conduct research for businesses, nonprofits, legal matters, and more. You also can learn a new language, plan your next adventure, and do genealogy research.
  • Have kids or teens in your home? We have ample resources for children and teenagers, including homework help, reading, games, creating, planning for the future, and more. (Also, see above for new virtual services!)
  • Dig into some regional history and genealogy. For example, our digital collection features historic photographs, pamphlets, manuscripts, maps, oral histories, films and more that highlight the rich history of the Pikes Peak area.
  • Find a good book! Check out recommendations, reading lists, and more.
  • Don’t have a library card? Get started and gain online access today.

That’s not all! Our Library staff also assembled and vetted a growing list of free online resources for all ages; no library card needed. Resources include live streaming, virtual tours, activities, and much more. Topics cover arts and culture, kids and teens, learning and reading for adults, professional support and development, and science and nature.

Our team continues to explore and expand virtual opportunities that we can bring to you. Right now, we’re adding to our digital collection, as budget allows, and creating new virtual experiences that will launch in the coming days and weeks.

Stay tuned for more updates from PPLD. We’re here to serve you now and into the future.

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Social Work at PPLD

We’ve all found ourselves in a difficult situation and we aren’t always sure where to turn. Pikes Peak Library District offers social work services across the District. Our social workers are here to help you navigate and connect with resources in the community by providing referrals and information to get the help you need for your specific situation. Reach out and meet with a social worker at the Library most convenient to you, or contact them by phone or email. We are happy to support you in finding the best resources for you and your needs.

Contact PPLD's Social Worker

Common questions from our patrons include

  • How to find affordable housing
  • Where to get assistance with finding employment
  • How to go about applying for disability
  • Where to receive specific services like mental health, medical, or substance use treatment

Crisis Help:

Emergency Shelter:

  • The Salvation Army RJMC (serving adults and families with children) (719) 578-9190
  • Springs Rescue Mission (serving adults 18 and over) (719) 632-1822
  • The Place (serving youth ages 15-20) (719) 630-3223
  • New Promise (serving families with children under age 18) (719) 358-6220
  • TESSA (serving survivors of domestic violence) (719) 633-3819
  • Crawford House (serving veterans receiving mental health care through the VA) (719) 477-1639

Other Resources:

Note: PPLD’s Social Worker is not a case manager or case worker.

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Did you notice that we had a lot of snow on March 1st? An old saying says that if “March comes in like a lion”, it goes “out like a lamb”. The weather may be blustery now, but it should be nice at the end of the month. So, snuggle up on your favorite chair, under a warm blanket, and share stories about the snow and upcoming spring! Choose both picture books and nonfiction about Weather. (J 551.5784) Click on the pdf link below to see the booklist.

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bin with horse figurines and bin with Greek mythological figures

We have added new figurines to our Educational Resource Center collection. We have beautiful horse figurines from around the world and creatures from Greek mythology. Soon we will have a booklet with a little information about each kind of horse. Come to the Educational Resource Center at East Library to check them out!

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One Book Colorado

One Book Colorado gives away copies of the same book title to each four year old in the state via public libraries.


The program, in its ninth year, stems from the idea that providing young children with access to books promotes early literacy skills and helps families serve as their children’s first teachers.


From Tue., Oct. 13 to Sun., Oct. 25, any four-year-old can pick up a free book from any PPLD Library. There will be English and Spanish versions available (while supplies last).


This is a state-wide initiative to emphasize the importance of early literacy and reading to children. The 2020 winning book will be announced October 13! The contenders are:

  • The Greatest Adventure [La aventura más grande] by Tony Piedra
  • The Little Red Fort [El fuertecito rojo] by Brenda Maier
  • The Very Impatient Caterpillar [La oruga muy impaciente] by Ross Burach

And the winner is... The Little Red Fort [El fuertecito rojo] by Brenda Maier!

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Check Out PPLD's New Catalog!

Where Is It?
For the last several months, Pikes Peak Library District worked diligently to update and remodel PPLD’s online Catalog, designed with you, our patrons, in mind. We incorporated new features and re-arranged things to provide a cleaner, easier-to-use interface, which gives the catalog a modern, up-to-date look. Some features and links have moved around, so we’ve created this guide to help you navigate it.

The new Catalog went live March 8!


New Features
  • The number of holds, total copies, and available copies are readily visible.
  • The item status is clearer: checked in, checked out, on hold shelf, or being transferred between Libraries.
  • “Add Author Alert” allows patrons to sign up to receive notifications when items by their favorite authors are added to our Catalog. They only need an email address to create an account and can select their preferred format(s).
  • When searching the Catalog within one of our Libraries, that location’s items will show up on top. (When patrons search from home, locations will be listed alphabetically.)
  • Series info, as well as related titles and authors, are now more easily accessible through the Details tab.
  • Options to limit search results are now in drop down menus instead of patrons having to scroll through the myriad options.
  • Links have been pared down or moved to the bottom of the page for less visual clutter.

Additional Information
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Census 2020

The 2020 Census is here and it’s not too late to complete it! It is important to fill it out so that local agencies (PPLD included!) have accurate information to use when designing community services. It's safe, easy, and required for all citizens to fill out.


COMPLETE YOUR CENSUS NOW.


In March, homes across the country received invitations to complete the 2020 Census with instructions for responding to the census online, in the mail, or over the phone.

Remember that April 1 is a reference date, not a deadline to respond. When you respond online, by phone, or by mail, count everyone living in your home as of April 1, 2020.

Beginning in August 2020, households that haven't responded yet may receive an in-person visit or call from a Census Bureau employee to help make sure everyone is counted.


As of June 11, El Paso County’s self-response rate, is now at 68.6%, which is higher than Colorado’s self-response rate of 63.4%! We are ranked number 18 in response rates by state, and higher than the national self-response rate of 60.8%!


Here’s a quick refresher of what it is and why it’s essential that everyone is counted.

  • Everyone counts: The census counts every person living in the United States once, only once, and in the right place.
  • It’s about fair representation: Every 10 years, the results of the census are used to reapportion the House of Representatives, determining how many seats each state gets.
  • It’s in the Constitution: The U.S. Constitution mandates that everyone in the country be counted every 10 years. The first census was in 1790.
  • It’s about $675 billion: The distribution of more than $675 billion in federal funds, grants, and support to states, counties, and communities are based on census data. That money is spent on schools, hospitals, roads, public works, and other vital programs (like libraries!).
  • It’s about redistricting: After each decade’s census, state officials redraw the boundaries of the congressional and state legislative districts in their states to account for population shifts.
  • Taking part is your civic duty: Completing the census is mandatory: it’s a way to participate in our democracy and say “I COUNT!”

Census data are being used all around you:

  • Residents use the census to support community initiatives involving legislation, quality-of-life, and consumer advocacy.
  • Businesses use census data to decide where to build factories, offices, and stores, which create jobs.
  • Local governments use the census for public safety and emergency preparedness.
  • Real estate developers use the census to build new homes and revitalize old neighborhoods.

Your privacy is protected.
It’s against the law for the Census Bureau to publicly release your responses in any way that could identify you or your household. By law, your responses cannot be used against you and can only be used to produce statistics.

The Census Bureau uses a different method to count people in group living situations, called “group quarters,” such as college student housing, prisons, military barracks, and nursing homes. People experiencing homelessness (and who are not staying in a household) will be counted at the places where they receive services, such as shelters and soup kitchens.

2020 will be easier than ever.
In 2020, you will be able to respond to the census online. The online questionnaire will be available in 13 languages.


Click here to learn more!

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Indoor Snowball Fight

You will need:

  • Masking tape, string or yarn for a dividing line
  • Newspaper or recycled paper for snowballs
  • A phone timer, or use the timer on a microwave
  • Recycle bin or garbage can

Instructions:

  1. Crumple newspaper or recycled copy paper into balls.
  2. Divide a room in half with masking tape, string or yarn.
  3. Put the same number of balls on each side of the room.
  4. Divide into teams.
  5. Turn on the timer for 3 minutes.
  6. Throw snowballs across the dividing line and when the timer rings the side with the least snowballs wins! Try it again!

Afterward try to make baskets in the recycle bin. Give everyone 5 tries. Whoever has the most baskets gets to make up the next game to do with the snowballs.

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It’s a good idea to start very early with tooth cleaning. To make the job more fun, here are some picture books about your teeth: dental visits, tooth fairies and taking care of your “pearly whites”! Click on the pdf link below:

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With a determined posture and a set look on her face, Kim Seaborn takes a deep breath to begin another take.

After singing a few lines, she stops, looking satisfied.

“I think we got it,” says Keagan Kellogg, sound engineer for Studio916.

Seaborn relaxes her shoulders and smiles before stepping away from the microphone to celebrate with the rest of the team. Her full-length album: officially a wrap.

Seaborn worked for weeks alongside Kellogg and Studio916 producer TerryJosiah Sharpe to record her second full-length album without incurring any expenses, inside a facility of Pikes Peak Library District.

“Here, I got to work with professionals,” Seaborn says. “I found the team here was so easy to work with and just really let me be myself, and they helped me flourish creatively.”

Seaborn started performing in front of her church’s congregation when she was just a sixth grader, and remembers the intensely overwhelming feeling of impacting the crowd.

“I saw people crying,” Seaborn remembers. “Seeing that emotion from the crowd… that was something I liked. If I can get a person to be transformed with my singing, that’s what makes it worthwhile to me.”

But standing up in front of large groups wasn’t something that came naturally to her.

“I’m a very shy person,” Seaborn says. “When I was growing up, I tried to do things that would take me out of that shyness. I felt singing was one of the things I could do to get me out of my shell.”

Her first album, His Glory, was completed in 2014. She was ready to record another one soon after but wanted to break away from the traditional feel of her first full-length album.

Plus, the sheer cost of recording an album was another hurdle.

“These hours in the recording studio can cost thousands of dollars,” Seaborn remembers.

But then she learned of a studio she could use at no cost at Sand Creek Library: Studio916. She attended a studio orientation to learn more about using the space. Then, she checked every day for open studio sessions because they were so frequently booked.

As she got into the studio more and more, Seaborn found that she had a team of experts at her disposal in Kellogg and Sharpe. “It helped me break out of my shell,” she remembers. “When you have people who know what they’re doing, it just gels.”

Now, Seaborn has a vision for her future as a musician, hoping to record more music as well as further market herself as a singer/songwriter and get her music out into the world.

She hopes other aspiring artists in the Pikes Peak region will take advantage of Studio916.

“To these young people with a dream, I say go for it,” Seaborn says. “If music is something that is a part of your purpose and you’re willing to put in some work, do it. It is thousands of dollars to do elsewhere what you can do at the Library for free.”

Click here for more news from around your Library district!

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Scrap Exchange with Who Gives a Scrap image

In collaboration with Who Gives a SCRAP Creative Reuse Center, we are hosting an arts, craft, and hobby material exchange! Bring in your new, clean/gently used and unwanted craft materials and exchange them for tickets to exchange new-to-you craft supplies!

Please only bring in crafting supplies and not items that are considered trash, in bad condition, or items that can be recycled.

We will also have a fun up-cycling craft so you can take your time and check for new inventory! No registration required.

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Make and indoor or outdoor obstacle course with stuff you have around the house.
Time yourself to see how long it takes to get through.
The winner gets to create a new obstacle course!
Safety first when creating your challenges for each other!

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The top 10 of 2019 are here! Learn more about what the Pikes Peak Region read in 2019 and add any you missed to your 2020 reading list!


Adult Books
  1. Where the Crawdads Sing by Delia Owens
  2. Becoming by Michelle Obama
  3. The Reckoning by John Grisham
  4. Educated: a Memoir by Tara Westover
  5. Wolf Pack by C.J. Box
  6. TransAtlantic: a Novel by Colum McCann
  7. Redemption by David Baldacci
  8. Nine Perfect Strangers by Liane Moriarty
  9. Unsolved by James Patterson
  10. The Silent Patient by Alex Michaelides

Teen Books
  1. Nowhere Boy by Katherine Marsh
  2. Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows by J.K Rowling
  3. Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince by J.K. Rowling
  4. The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas
  5. Turtles All the Way Down by John Green
  6. Mockingjay by Suzanne Collins
  7. The Giver by Lois Lowry
  8. On the Come Up by Angie Thomas
  9. To All the Boys I've Loved Before by Jenny Han
  10. Carve the Mark by Veronica Roth

Children's Books
  1. Hatchet by Gary Paulsen
  2. Harry Potter and the Socerer's Stone by J.K. Rowling
  3. Rain Reign by Ann M. Martin
  4. Nowhere Boy by Katherine Marsh
  5. Diary of a Wimpy Kid: The Meltdown by Jeff Kinney
  6. The One and Only Ivan by Katherine Applegate
  7. A Long Walk to Water: a Novel by Linda Sue Park
  8. Number the Stars by Lois Lowry
  9. Warriors in Winter by Mary Pope Osborne
  10. The False Prince by Jennifer Nielsen

eBooks
  1. A Dangerous Act of Kindness by LP Fergusson
  2. Redemption: Amos Decker Series, Book 5 by David Baldacci
  3. The Silent Patient by Alex Michaelides
  4. Wolf Pack by C.J. Box
  5. After the Flood: A Novel by Kassandra Montag
  6. An Anonymous Girl: A Novel by Greer Hendricks
  7. Run Away by Harlan Coben
  8. Connections in Death by J.D. Robb
  9. The 18th Abduction by James Patterson
  10. Neon Prey by John Sandford

eAudio
  1. The Silent Patient (unabridged) by Alex Michaelide
  2. Girl, Stop Apologizing: A Shame-Free Plan for Embracing and Achieving Your Goals (unabridged) by Rachel Hollis
  3. Redemption: Amos Decker Series, Book 5 (unabridged) by David Baldacci
  4. The Giver of Stars: A Novel (unabridged) by Jojo Moyes
  5. City of Girls: A Novel (unabridged) by Elizabeth Gilbert
  6. The Dutch House: A Novel (unabridged) by Ann Patchett
  7. The Institute: A Novel (unabridged) by Stephen King
  8. Daisy Jones & the Six: A Novel (unabridged) by Taylor Jenkins Reid
  9. The Turn of the Key (unabridged) by Ruth Ware
  10. The Guardians: A Novel (unabridged) by John Grisham
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Go on an eggs-pedition with Pengoloo, an enchanting memory game for children. Roll the dice and look for the matching colored eggs underneath the penguins. A good memory and a little luck will help you be the first to collect six penguins on your iceberg to win! This game is available at our Educational Resource Center.

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Blood Drives at the Library

Vitalant provides blood to 1,000 hospitals across 40 states where it is used in a variety of medical treatments. A single blood donation can save and enhance the lives of up to three patients. Registration is not required. Just find the truck in the parking lot!

Click here to see if you are eligible.


A quick visit, with light refreshments, can save lives!

  • Where: Monument Library
  • When: From 11 a.m. - 3 p.m.
  • May 30
  • July 25
  • Sept. 26
  • Nov. 28
  • Where: East Library
  • When: From 10 a.m. - noon
    • February 22
    • April 25
    • June 27
    • Aug. 22
    • Oct. 24
    • Dec. 26
  • Where: Library 21c
  • When: From 2:30 - 4:30 p.m.
    • February 22
    • April 25
    • June 27
    • Aug. 22
    • Oct. 24
    • Dec. 26

Click here to learn more about Vitalant.

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January is National Hobbies Month! image

Is there a favorite thing you enjoy doing…either by yourself or with your friends? January is a time to celebrate your hobbies. Whether it is sports or crafting or music or magic, the Library is the perfect place to learn more about your hobby. Enjoy these picture books, click on the pdf link below:

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Name of the Sculpture: Virage

The natural environment is one of our treasures in Colorado. Pikes Peak Library District (PPLD) sought proposals for an interactive, 3D, freestanding art piece to draw attention to this resource and its conservation. The call was answered by several artists and, after a jury process, Virage was selected. It is eye catching, conversation evoking, appropriate for all ages, safe for public spaces, and movable among Library locations. Throughout the year this sculpture will travel to four PPLD locations: Penrose Library, Sand Creek Library, East Library, and Library 21c.

With a focus on the beauty of our natural environment and conservation, PPLD hopes to evoke conversation and interaction among patrons. A variety of programming will be offered throughout the District that relates to this topic.

Click Here to learn about related programs.


Post your photos of and with #PPLDSustainaball on social media!

Virage 1 imageVirage 2 imageVirage 3 imageVirage 4 imageVirage 5 image

Artist Narrative:
The current political atmosphere has created an unsettling time with the lifting of protections to the environment, denial of scientific knowledge and climate change, and inclusiveness and access to education. Virage subtly, yet critically speaks to the impacts of humans on the environment and the consequences ahead. The beauty of the barks’ texture together with the perfect form of the sphere is meant to give a sense of hope and promise that humankind will take responsibility, humankind will find a respectful and healthy balance with the natural world and ecosystems. Human beings have the incredible ability to be innovative and creative, when presented the opportunity solve insolvable puzzles. The artwork invites the viewer to consider and reconsider the current choices and actions as a consumer. There is an intended charge to the viewer to make our natural world the highest priority - to practice conservation.
Artist Biography:
Nikki Pike grew up in Black Forest, Colorado, where she learned to ride bikes and climb trees in between flashlight tag, midnight soccer, and competitive sledding. The adopted daughter of a nurse and an engineer, and sister to four brothers and a sister, Nikki learned to work in groups and negotiate at an early age. Fighting over the measuring cups in the bathtub and wooden spoons in the garden, the Pike family children grew wild imaginations.

The earliest sign that Nikki may later become a sculptor was in her sixteenth year in being grounded for a month. Rather than moping around and feeling sorry for her new life in confinement, Nikki raided her father’s toolbox and undertook the accidental but artistic resurfacing of her very first vehicle, an AMC gremlin. Otherwise, realizing her interest and making a commitment to art came much later after her surrender to finally join the quest to attend college and explore communications design. Her exposure to materials and objects fed her need to make and build and fulfilled the physical gap that once was spent playing soccer. 

Now, Nikki Pike is an artist and activist committed to serving the community through her art practice and role as an educator. Through the use of universally positive human experiences such as curiosity, music, surprise, and gifting, along with the influence of Maslow’s hierarchy of needs, she spreads values of empowerment, vulnerability and connection in the form of experience as opposed to product. Nikki sees herself as a cultural agent working together with local communities promoting activity and creativity. With her an expansive practice, Nikki straddles public arts, social sculpture, service srt and is exploring ideas of relief art intended to aide communities responding to disaster. Her methods start from the ideals of democracy and her work has been featured at the Denver Art Museum, the Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art, and Art Basel Miami to name a few. Currently Nikki resides in Denver, Colorado, and holds a professorship at the University of Colorado, Colorado Springs.

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December is for Gift Giving! (Picture Books Published in 2019) book jacket

When you are looking for the perfect gift…look no further than your library for great inspiration. You’ll find books, CDs, DVDs, Blu-ray, magazines and so much more within the walls of your local library branch. Find a gift your child will treasure for years to come. Opening a book from the library is like unwrapping a gift every day! Click on the pdf link below to see some of our favorite picture books:

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Easy Ornament Gifts book jacket

Make ornaments or book marks for gifts this season.
Be creative! You can make animals, people or fantasy creatures!

Materials:

  • Colored paper or magazines
  • Markers
  • Glue
  • Scissors
  • Craft Sticks or pieces of heavy paper
  • Yarn, string or ribbon for hanging
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Read these stories together. Then spend time with Mom, Dad or a grandparent and share your own family stories. Tell stories about what you or your ancestors have done. Imagine what you may do in the future. Click on the pdf link below to see the reading list.

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