What's New!

PPLD Homeschool: Cooking Up Some Fun!

Submit a recipe to Pikes Peak Library District's A Harvest of Recipes digital cookbook!
Use this link to upload your recipe: https://ppld.librariesshare.com/ppldrecipes/

Some Fun Facts about Grilled Cheese
❖ Though similar recipes were mentioned in ancient Roman texts, the grilled cheese sandwich was technically invented in France in 1910, known as the Croque Monsieur.
❖ However, most experts agree that the first grilled cheese sandwiches were made in the United States in the 1920s when Otto Frederick Rohwedder invented a bread slicer that made distributing white bread easy and affordable.
❖ Shortly before that, processed cheese has been patented by James L. Kraft, whose pasteurizing process ensured that cheese would not spoil, even when transported great distances (the first Kraft plant opened in Illinois in 1914).
❖ During WWII, Navy Cooks prepared open faced grilled cheese sandwiches on Navy ships as instructed by government issued cookbooks. These sandwiches were called “American Cheese Filling Sandwiches.”
❖ In 1949, people finally began to add the second slice of bread to the top of this sandwich to make it more filling, and the sandwich we all know and love was born.
❖ The name “grilled cheese” wasn’t used until the 1960s; before then it was called “toasted cheese” or “melted cheese” sandwiches.
❖ Approximately 3/4 of people who buy sliced cheese make at least one grilled cheese sandwich per month.
❖ National Grilled Cheese Day is celebrated on April 12th!

Recipes:(Please use adult help with slicing or heating!)
Watch these grilled cheese recipes at: https://youtu.be/6_hqpb7EO4k

I. Allison’s Grilled Cheese Sandwich
Ingredients:
Bread
Butter
Cheese slices (thin)
Optional (onion, apple, kale)
Stone ground mustard
--experiment with your own ingredients—
Instructions:
Butter bread slices on one side, flip slices over and add mustard to insides of bread.
Stack up ingredients between bread slices.
Place in heated frying pan (low to medium heat); cover with lid.
Cook on low to med. heat until bread is toasty and golden on one side; flip over until done. Cheese should be melted.

II. Betty’s Gluten and Dairy Free Grilled Cheese Sandwich
Ingredients:
Gluten-free bread
Vegan butter spread
Sliced vegan “cheese”
Avocado (optional)
Mustard
Instructions:
Butter bread slices on one side, flip slices over and add sliced cheese.
Scoop out avocado and spread (if desired); add mustard to top slice.
Place in heated frying pan (low to medium heat); cover with lid.
Cook on low to med. heat until bread is toasty and golden on one side; flip over until done. Adjust heat as needed. Cheese should be melted.

III. Brady’s Grilled Cheese
Ingredients:
Whole wheat bread (or bread of your choice)
Butter
Garlic clove (broken open)
Mayonnaise
Cheese slices (American, grated cheddar, or your choice)
Instructions:
Cover all sides of bread with mayonnaise.
Heat non-stick electric griddle; carefully rub with butter and clove of garlic.
Place one slice of bread on hot pan.
Add cheese; top with other slice of bread.
Cook until bread is toasty and golden on one side; flip over until done.
Cheese should be melted.

IV. Amanda’s Easy Creamy Microwave Tomato Soup in a Mug
Ingredients:
7 oz. diced tomatoes
½ tbsp. tomato paste
½ cup broth
1/8 cup light cream
Optional (to taste): sweet yellow onion, basil, pesto, salt and pepper
Supplies:
Mug
Blender
Microwave
Instructions:
Add all ingredients together in blender.
Blend until smooth.
Transfer soup into a microwave safe mug.
Microwave for one minute.
Let cool and enjoy!

V. Athena’s Cake in a Mug Recipe
Ingredients:
1/4 cup flour
2 tbs. sugar
1/2 tsp. baking powder
A pinch of salt
1/4 cup milk
1 tbs. oil
1/2 tsp vanilla extract
Instructions:
Pour the dry ingredients into your mug and mix.
Add the wet ingredients, and then mix until there are no large clumps or dry flour at the bottom of the mug.
Microwave for 90 seconds. (You may need to adjust this 10 seconds in either direction, based on your microwave's power.)
Be careful pulling the hot mug out of the microwave!
At this point, you could add some icing or a scoop of ice cream, or eat your cake plain. Enjoy!

Citations and Resources:
“Kids Vs. Science: Making The Greatest Grilled Cheese;” Mental Floss video; https://youtube.com/watch?v=tAN6vC7-YeA
“How chemistry creates the perfect, gooey grilled cheese sandwich;” PBS News Hour; http://pbs.org/newshour/science/grilled-cheese-chemistry-forever
“What a cheesy sandwich looks like in 15 places around the world;” Insider; http://insider.com/grilled-cheese-around-the-world-2018-10
“History of the Grilled Cheese Sandwich;” Daily Dish Magazine; http://foodiefriendsfridaydailydish.com/national-grilled-cheese-month-hi...
“The History of the Grilled Cheese;” The Committed Pig blog;
http://www.thecommittedpig.com/the-history-of-the-grilled-cheese-and-how...
“The History of the Grilled Cheese Sandwich;”
https://recipes.howstuffworks.com/history-of-grilled-cheese.htm

Photo by Micheile Henderson on Unsplash

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Piratepalooza! Books "RRRR" Me Treasure

SUPPLIES:

  • Pirate Coloring Sheet Find and print it here: http://www.getcoloringpages.com/coloring/96888
  • Crayons or markers
  • Glue (liquid glue and a glue stick)
  • One piece of thin cardboard cut from cereal box, or one piece of heavy cardstock or poster board
  • Sparkly things for treasure:
    • Sequins
    • Sparkly confetti
    • Craft “bling”
    • Coins cut or punched from shiny paper or foil— shiny gift bags and tags work great!
    • Jewelry or crowns—make from sparkly pipe cleaners, shiny narrow cord or ribbon, shiny paper or craft bling

INSTRUCTIONS:

  1. Print the pirate coloring sheet
  2. Color the picture and write Books “RRRR” Me Treasure! near the top of the page
  3. Glue cardboard or cardstock on the back of the picture for extra support
  4. Using glue, add sparkly items for treasure

Watch this storytime at: https://youtu.be/qIVYeIzjeT0

Comments: 0
KidsMake: Magnetic Tracks

Take and Makes for this project will be available starting this Friday, Sept. 18, 2020 at PPLD Libraries and are recommended for kids, ages 5-12.

Supplies:

  • Paper or paper plate
  • Markers or crayons
  • Glue or glue dot or 2-sided tape
  • Magnet
  • Craft stick

Directions:

  1. Use the provided paper or your own supplies to draw a shape to race around on your magnet track. You might choose a vehicle (car, truck, train, boat, etc.), an animal (cow, fish, turtle, dog, etc.), or something entirely different. It should be small enough to go on your paper plate (less than 2 inches).
  2. Attach a magnet to the back using double-sided tape or a glue dot.
  3. Use your own markers, crayons, or colored pencils to create a course on your race track.
  4. Use double-sided tape or a glue to to attach a magnet to the end of your craft stick. Before you glue, you need to make sure that the magnet on the car and the magnet on the stick attract rather than repel each other. If they repel each other, turn the magnet for the stick over before attaching.
  5. Test your track! Set your shape (vehicle, animal, or other) on your track. Use the magnet on the craft stick under the plate to move and race the car.

Have fun!

Find the tutorial video at https://ppld.librarymarket.com/virtual-kidsmake-magnetic-race-tracks

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STEM: Solar Science

Supplies:

In Take and Make kit (pick up a kit starting 9/11/20 at any PPLD Library, while supplies last)

  • UV beads
  • Pipe cleaner
  • Paper plate
  • Pencil
  • Black construction paper
  • Template pdf below

You supply:

  • Glue
  • Scissors
  • Clock face template (pdf to print below)
  • Natural objects from outside: rocks, weeds, flowers, leaves, etc.

Directions:

  1. UV beads illustrate some of the harmful effects of the sun and therefore, why we use sunscreen. UV light is one type of light from the sun. We can’t see it, but insects and birds can. While this UV light can help our bodies produce Vitamin D, too much of it can also cause sunburn or skin damage. Take the UV beads in your kit and string them on a pipe cleaner to make a bracelet. Go outside to watch them react to the UV rays – even on a cloudy day. You might also want to experiment with sunscreen, sunglasses, or windows and see what happens!
  2. You can also use the power of the sun, construction paper, and natural objects to create a work of art. Take your piece of paper and place it in a sunny place. You may need to weight it down. Place natural objects on the paper and leave it all in the sun for several hours. The UV rays of the sun help break down the dye in the paper creating your design. We found that we had to tape down some of the objects so they didn’t blow away. If you use tape, be careful that it doesn’t show.
  3. Next, you can make a sundial clock. Decorate the plate if you’d like. Cut out and glue the clock face to the back side of the plate. Poke the pencil through the center of the plate and take it outside. You’ll need to place the clock with the “12” facing north to determine the correct time. Watch how your clock tells time during the day.

These activities are based on:

http://solar-center.stanford.edu/activities/UVBeads/UV-Bead-Instructions...

https://www.scholastic.com/parents/school-success/learning-toolkit-blog/...

https://www.raisingarizonakids.com/2015/06/how-to-make-sundial-clock/

Comments: 0
Water Balloon Parachute

TAKE AND MAKE: Water Balloon Parachute
Can your water balloons survive a big drop? Find out with this experiment.
Pick up your Take and Make kit at PPLD Libraries starting September 4, 2020

Supplies:

  • One balloon
  • Water
  • One plastic shopping bag
  • One rubber band

Directions:

  1. Add water to your balloon, don't fill the balloon, leave lots of room to tie the balloon closed.
  2. Cut the ends of the handles of the bags. Tie or rubber band them to the knotted end of a water balloon.
  3. Go outside and drop it from a high place to see if it breaks when it lands.
  4. Test and retest until your balloon breaks.
  5. Try it again with another balloon.

See what else you can attach to your parachute and let drop.

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SDA AwardThere are nearly 3,000 special districts in the state of Colorado, including library districts, park districts, water districts, fire districts, and many others. Every year, one district from those thousands is chosen by the Special District Association of Colorado to receive its highest honor, the J. Evan Goulding District of the Year Award. We are excited to announce that the SDA has chosen Pikes Peak Library District as this year's recipient!


The J. Evan Goulding District of the Year Award was established by the SDA Board of Directors to single out a district that demonstrates exceptional leadership and community spirit. This award recognizes a district's major accomplishments, series of outstanding efforts, and a steady determination to serve its constituency. This year's winner, Pikes Peak Library District, truly exemplifies these qualities.

The history of public libraries in the Pikes Peak Region began in October 1885 when the Colorado Springs Social Union established a library in downtown Colorado Springs. In 1905, a new library opened with funds donated by Andrew Carnegie and land granted by General William Jackson Palmer. In 1962, a majority of El Paso County citizens voted to establish a special taxing district, and Pikes Peak Library District (PPLD) was formed. After not joining the District initially in 1962, the town of Manitou Springs subsequently voted to join PPLD at the beginning of 2013.

As the second largest library system in Colorado, PPLD serves a population of more than 660,000 residents in El Paso
County, with the exception of Security/Widefield School District #3. This includes all unincorporated areas and municipalities of Calhan, Colorado Springs, Ellicott, Falcon, Fountain, Manitou Springs, Monument, and Palmer Lake. The District is able to serve such a large number of citizens thanks to an employee base of nearly 475 full-and part-time staff and almost 1,700 volunteers. PPLD’s Board of Trustees consists of seven members from the community. The citizen volunteers are appointed jointly by the Colorado Springs City Council and El Paso County Commissioners for a maximum of two five-year terms.

The District currently operates 16 facilities throughout the county. In addition to the large collections of physical and digital materials that are available, a number of sites also feature state-of-the art services, such as makerspaces and studios. PPLD’s makerspaces offer access to tools, materials, and machines to help bring patrons’ creative visions to life. Equipment such as 3D printers; laser engraving and cutting machines; and assorted handicraft and art tools are all available for use. In the District’s studios, Library cardholders have access to items such as cameras, audio mixers, and even a green screen to produce professional-grade recordings. Moreover, the District operates a three-vehicle mobile fleet that delivers Library services to more rural and remote areas as well as to communities for individuals who have limited mobility.

The District has also established a number of strategic partnerships to help serve their local community. For example, the new Pikes Peak Culture Pass program allows patrons to explore museums and attractions in the Pikes Peak region at no cost. By collaborating with local organizations, PPLD provides free admission passes for check out, increasing opportunities for education and cultural learning. In addition, the District has expanded its adult learning programs in recent years. Career Online High School is an online high school diploma and career certification program provided by PPLD. Students can choose a major from a list of high-growth, high-demand career fields and complete coursework to develop the skills and knowledge that employers are looking for. The District also offers English as a Second Language classes and food industry training.

In 2018, in partnership with The Place (formerly Urban Peak Colorado Springs), the District launched a first-of-its-kind initiative in Colorado aimed at helping teen runaways and youth experiencing homelessness. The partnership resulted in PPLD locations becoming a part of the National Safe Place Network. As a part of this network, an at-risk youth can enter the library and ask for help. From there, the library staff can contact The Place who will then arrive and begin to find the appropriate assistance.

During the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, the District transformed its library services to expand access beyond the traditional use of libraries. PPLD launched a number of virtual programs and began offering curbside services. When the pandemic first began and there was concern over a shortage of personal protective equipment (PPE), the District became involved with a group called Make4COVID, whose wide network of members worked together to 3D print PPE. As part of the effort, PPLD distributed several of its larger 3D printers to makers in the community who were then able to make face shield parts in the safety of their own homes. The District staff also used sewing machines and smaller 3D printers to assist in this vital work.

For nearly 60 years, Pikes Peak Library District has welcomed all members of their local community to enrich their minds, make connections, and reach their full potential. Through innovative initiatives and programming, resourcefulness, and responsiveness to the needs of their patrons, the District is truly living its mission to provide library resources and services that impact lives and build community across El Paso County.

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Tween Twist: Banned Books Wearables (Mini-Charms)

Link to tutorial on YouTube: https://youtu.be/vJyL_xqPI0E

Supplies needed:

  • Book template printed on cardstock
  • Book cover printed on paper
  • Glue Stick
  • Blank paper
  • Needle & thread
  • Jump ring
  • Optional: Key chain ring or necklace chord

Directions:

  1. Cut out a cardstock book template and the book cover of your choice (see pdf files below).
  2. Use the glue stick to glue the cover to the book template.
  3. Crease the flaps around the edges.
  4. Cut out 4-6 rectangles that you will fold in half to make the book’s pages. You can eyeball this, but they will be approximately 4.75 cm x 3.5 cm.
  5. Line up the pages and fold in half. This stack of folded pages is called a “signature”. Trim if necessary so that the pages fit in the book.
  6. Thread a needle with about 6 inches of thread.
  7. Sew the pages together with a pamphlet stitch. You will be poking 3 holes in the crease of the folded pages: one in the top, one in the middle, and one in the bottom. You can mark these holes with pencil beforehand if you would like to.
  8. Start by poking the needle in through the middle of the crease (see picture). The needle should go through the back of the pages and come out inside the inner fold. Leave a couple of inches of thread hanging out the back. Hold these 3 inches while you sew and do not let them pull through. You will be tying a knot with them at the end.
  9. Push the needle up through the top of the pages (inside to outside).
  10. Go back down near the bottom of the pages (outside to inside).
  11. Pull the needle one last time through the center hole.
  12. Use the thread you left hanging out the back and the thread still on the needle to tie a square knot—right over left, then left over right.
  13. Flip the cover template over, line up the pages of the signature you’ve just sewn, and use a glue stick to glue the leftmost and rightmost pages of the signature to the inside of the template.
  14. Run your glue stick over all the tabs of the cover template and then press them onto the two glued pages until the folio is fully secured to the cover template on both sides.
  15. Fold both sides of the spine with your fingers to finish your book!
  16. Now use the needle to poke a hole through the top of the spine all the way through to the inside. Widen the hole by wiggling the needle.
  17. Open a jump ring with your fingers by holding it in front of you and pulling one side forward while you push the other back. Do not open by pulling the sides outward or it will not fully close.
  18. Poke the jump ring through the hole you’ve created. You may have to go back and widen the hole further. At this point, you can attach a key ring to it or string it on a chord to make a necklace. Close the jump ring when you’re done!
  19. Voila! You have a miniature book charm. If you want it to lay flat, you can place it under a light object/between two objects overnight to make it stay fully closed. You could optionally paint it with mod podge to keep it safe from wear and tear!

Show off what you've made by entering our PPLD Challenge: Banned Books Art.

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All You Need Is Your Library

At Pikes Peak Library District, you can do anything you set your mind to. We, of course, offer books at each of our libraries. But did you know you can also get help with at-home education, do virtual yoga, learn a new language, discover your family tree, stream music, watch movies, and more? PPLD offers so many exciting things, it’s hard to capture them all! Learn more about what all you can access with your library card below.

Thanks to the public’s investment and taxpayer support, Pikes Peak Library District can provide Library resources and services to all cardholders for free. You can learn more about PPLD's budget and expenditures here.

My Library: Kids Edition!


Getting your Library Card

Click here to learn more.


My Account

From managing your holds, interlibrary loans, set notification preferences, and more! Click here to learn more.


Download the App


The Catalog

Find books, eBooks, audiobooks, music, movies, video games, board games, and more! Click here for instructions on using the catalog.


eLearning

Find help and support for your at-home learning endeavors at ppld.org/eLearning.


eBooks


Audiobooks


Movies & TV Shows


Music


Programs

Click here to see our full calendar of events


Magazines & Newspapers


Languages

Mango Languages


Genealogy Research


Homework & Homeschool Help


Personal & Professional Development


Databases

Research Guides

And More...

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Storytime@Home: Digital Storytime Materials

Missing Storytime at your favorite Library? Our Family and Children's Services librarians are creating Storytime at Home materials for you and you family to enjoy. Every themed Storytime includes top literary picks with easy links to our online Catalog, music, crafting, and literacy tips. Click the photos or the link for more information about each activity.

Get yours by following @PPLDKids on Facebook or get them straight to your email! Subscribe here!


All Storytimes:

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Maker in Residence: Sustainable Art with Cara McKinley

2020 is certainly a year that we will forever remember. The COVID-19 pandemic has forced us all to flex and develop our 21st Century Skills (communication, collaboration, critical thinking, and creativity) in order to reinvent our way of life and stay connected to our community. Faced with these challenges, local artist Cara McKinley has worked with PPLD’s Creative Services staff to completely reinvent and rebuild the annual Maker in Residence Program (MIR), adapting it to meet social-distancing needs.

Explore Fall Maker in Residence Create Together: Community Build to learn about the collaborative art project!


Classes

In place of in-person classes, Cara has created skill-based project videos that introduce the viewer to traditional clay ceramic and assemblage skills using non-traditional, sustainable materials readily available at home. We encourage you to follow along with the projects using your own materials, so we’ve provided a suggested supply list with each video so that you can participate at your own convenience.

Recognizing the value of direct interaction, we also scheduled several MIR Live Chats to provide community members with an opportunity to chat with Cara and ask her questions about the videos and her art style, connect with other community members, and show off their finished pieces.

  • Clay Dig
    • Clay Dig part one: A quick tutorial on how to find and dig clay, overviewing what properties or characteristics to look for when digging, with conscientious and ethical dig considerations included.
    • Clay Dig part two: Using the locally-sourced clay from part one, learn to create a small pinched object, and get a sneak peek into the Community Build projects that you'll find at PPLD Libraries across the Pikes Peak region!
      • Supplies: backyard clay (or air dry clay), plastic knife, plastic fork, pencil or pen
      • Optional: water cup, paint brush, inspiration foliage (leaves and flowers to press into the clay), pigment (tempera, acrylic, latex, glitter, etc.)
  • Sand Sculpture
    • Sand Sculptures part one: Using a tinfoil sculpted form as the base, this sandsculpting method of faux concrete sculpture incorporates glue, dirt, and pigment found in the home to coat the tinfoil form. See what other objects and materials can be added to create visual interest.
      • Supplies: Elmer's Glue (all purpose), dirt/sand from your yard (play sand works too), tinfoil, mixing cup, parchment paper
      • Optional: paint (latex, acrylic, or spray)
    • Sand Sculptures part two: For the sandcasting technique, use sand, glue, plastic, and different types of color such as food coloring or acrylic paint to create a one-part mold casting. Make and pour your own mixture into your favorite shapes in a form made from sand! Create one, two, or ten... you're the artist!
      • Supplies: Elmer's Glue (all purpose), dirt/sand from your yard (play sand works too), shallow container (or box lid), recycled plastic, parchment paper, fibrous string (yarn, rope, fabric strips), old brush or mixing stick, mixing cup, food coloring or pigment (watercolor paint, tempera), permanent marker
      • Optional: glitter, rhinestones, sequins, other found additions, tinfoil
  • Plastic Reboot
    • Plastic Reboot: Using simple and complex building methods, along with previous techniques (introduced in Clay Dig & Sand Sculptures), learn to reshape plastic using scissors, a nail file, and connection styles (maybe even some packaging tape). The everyday bottle is transformed into a treasure that catches light using rethought objects from your surroundings.
      • Supplies: plastic (found or collected), scissors, permanent marker
      • Optional: packaging tape (clear), nail file, pliers, drill XACTO, glue pigment mixture (or nail polish), wire, glitter, rhinestones, sequins, tinfoil, additional found objects
  • Maker Challenges

    Maker in Residence Cara McKinley wants you to pick a challenge from this video to complete in just an hour! Watch the video for inspiration prompts such as...
    • Make a tree ornament that you would want to live in if you were a bird
    • Make an instrument as tall and as wide as your body out of household objects and materials

    Watch the video to find more creative challenges!

  • Assembled Objects
    Here’s your chance to get a brief look at Cara McKinley’s studio while she explains why she enjoys working with natural and recycled materials and explains the importance of assembling objects to make art.

The Maker

Meet the Maker video

Cara McKinleyA transplanted surfer from South Florida, Cara has always been enthralled in looking at the natural world. After completing her Post Baccalaureate Studies at Indiana University Bloomington and Master of Fine Arts in Ceramics at the University of Tennessee in Knoxville, Cara moved to the rocky terrain of Colorado to recreate her observations in clay and multimedia. Using video, sculpture, installation and assemblage allows her the opportunity to indulge in the essence of an object and her world to create a shared reality. She makes in variable spaces in a continuous process of play using traditional and non-traditional media. Household objects, found items and natural materials such as sticks, sand, clay, tinfoil, metal, and glass express a way to enjoy and pay homage to nature.

Learn more at caramckinleyart.com.

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All Pikes Peak Reads 2021

Pikes Peak Library District is pleased to announce the selected titles for All Pikes Peak Reads (APPR) 2021. This year's titles explore theme of community.

APPR is Pikes Peak Library District's annual community reads program that focuses on celebrating literature, improving community connections, and fostering dialogue across social, cultural, and generational lines. Each year, PPLD selects APPR titles that focus on a variety of timely topics and plans a variety of community-wide programs. This year’s selected titles explore themes of hope, finding community and friendship, how we view those who are different than us, and how marginalized members of society are treated.

All Pikes Peak Reads at the Fine Arts Center
Hear short readings from all of our 2021 APPR titles and poetry readings by local poets. The evening will conclude with a reading and meet and greet with APPR author Nate Marshall.


Adult Selections

Finna

by Nate Marshall
FinnaDefinition of finna, created by the author: fin·na /ˈfinə/ contraction: (1) going to; intending to [rooted in African American Vernacular English] (2) eye dialect spelling of “fixing to” (3) Black possibility; Black futurity; Blackness as tomorrow

These poems consider the brevity and disposability of Black lives and other oppressed people in our current era of emboldened white supremacy, and the use of the Black vernacular in America’s vast reserve of racial and gendered epithets. Finna explores the erasure of peoples in the American narrative; asks how gendered language can provoke violence; and finally, how the Black vernacular, expands our notions of possibility, giving us a new language of hope.

Finna has received much critical acclaim and has been named One of the Best Books of the Year by NPR and the New York Public Library. The word “finna” was added to the Oxford English Dictionary (OED) in March 2020. In partnership with the Colorado College English Department, this title was chosen as an Adult All Pikes Peak Reads selection to encourage conversation about how we use and change language to reflect and find community, and also to inspire young people to explore the art of poetry to tell their stories.

Virtual Author Visits
Join Pikes Peak Library District for a visit from the Colorado College Mobile Arts Truck!

Meet Nate Marshall, a local poet and author of Finna, a 2021 All Pikes Peak Reads selection. You will also have the chance to participate in a short poetry workshop, listen to a reading by Nate, and grab a poetry craft to take home.

  • When: Thu., Oct. 14 from 6 to 7 p.m.
  • Where: Library 21c
  • This event will be followed by a facilitated Q&A with Nate Marshall in the Venue at Library 21c.

Q&A with Nate Marshall
Join Pikes Peak Library District and Nate Marshall, author of Finna, a 2021 All Pikes Peak Reads selection, for a facilitated Q&A session. Along with discussing Finna, Nate will discuss themes of language and the role language plays in our lives and society.


Hidden Valley Road

by Robert Kolker
Hidden Valley RoadDon and Mimi Galvin seemed to be living the American dream. After World War II, Don's work with the Air Force brought them to Colorado, where their twelve children perfectly spanned the baby boom: the oldest born in 1945, the youngest in 1965. In those years, there was an established script for a family like the Galvins - aspiration, hard work, upward mobility, domestic harmony - and they worked hard to play their parts. But behind the scenes was a different story: psychological breakdown, sudden shocking violence, hidden abuse. By the mid-1970s, six of the ten Galvin boys, one after another, were diagnosed as schizophrenic. How could all this happen to one family?

Hidden Valley Road is an Oprah Book Club Pick, #1 New York Times Bestseller, and has been named Best Book of the Year by the New York Times, Washington Post, NPR, Time, and many others. This title was chosen as an Adult All Pikes Peak Reads Selection because of its local connection to the Colorado Springs community, its exploration of mental illness and associated stigmas, and its ability to shed new light on Schizophrenia and its treatments.

Virtual Author Visit

Both Finna and Hidden Valley Road contain adult themes and language.


Young Adult Title

Nimona

by Noelle Stevenson
NimonaNimona is a brilliantly subversive, sharply irreverent epic from Noelle Stevenson, full of nemeses, dragons, science, symbolism and more!

Nimona is an impulsive young shapeshifter with a knack for villainy. Lord Ballister Blackheart is a villain with a vendetta. As sidekick and supervillain, Nimona and Lord Blackheart are about to wreak some serious havoc. Their mission: prove to the kingdom that Sir Ambrosius Goldenloin and his buddies at the Institution of Law Enforcement and Heroics aren't the heroes everyone thinks they are.

But as small acts of mischief escalate into a vicious battle, Lord Blackheart realizes that Nimona's powers are as murky and mysterious as her past. And her unpredictable wild side might be more dangerous than he is willing to admit.

Nimona was chosen to be our Young Adult All Pikes Peak Reads 2021 pick due to its themes of finding community in unlikely places, enduring friendship, and exploration of how we treat those in our community we see as different. We also love its witty tone, graphic novel format, and deconstruction of fairy tale tropes.

Nimona was selected as Indies Choice Book of the Year, National Book Award Finalist, New York Times Bestseller, New York Times Notable Book, Kirkus Best Book, School Library Journal Best Book, Publishers Weekly Best Book, and NPR Best Book.

There will not be an author visit for the Young Adult book this year.


Children’s Title

Indian No More

by Charlene Willing McManis with Traci Sorell
Indian No MoreRegina Petit's family is forced from their homeland by the government and relocated to Los Angeles in 1957. Regina experiences a completely different life in a big city and learns about struggles, strength, community and heritage. For grades 3 - 6.

Indian No More was selected for the Children’s APPR book because this unique story based on historical events demonstrates appreciation and understanding for heritage and finding community where you are planted.
Indian No More was the winner of the 2020 American Indian Youth Literature Award for Best Middle Grade and chosen as a 2020 Global Read Aloud.

The late Charlene Willing Mcmanis (1953-2018) was born in Portland, Oregon and grew up in Los Angeles. She was of Umpqua tribal heritage and enrolled in the Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde. This novel is based on her family’s experiences after their tribe was terminated in 1954. She passed away in 2018, knowing that her friend Traci Sorell would complete the revisions Charlene was unable to finish.

Virtual Author Visit

Indian No More contains adult themes and language.


Comments: 2

The results are in!

The Betty Field Youth Memorial Writing Contest, sponsored by the Friends of Pikes Peak Library District, is writing contest for youth in grades 6-12 that focuses on mystery stories.

This year, 90 students submitted stories to the contest. These submissions were judged anonymously by volunteers from the Friends of the Library and Pikes Peak Library District staff, who entered over 400 scores for the stories!

6th Grade:

  • 1st place: "Pluto Found Missing" by Madalynn Moorhead
  • 2nd place: "Friend or Foe?" by Tristan Kumar
  • 3rd place: "The Girl Erased from Time" by Hudson Sheperd

7th Grade:

  • 1st place: "Scootered" by Jace Baehman
  • 2nd place: "The Dissociative Killer" by Raina Seybert
  • 3rd place: "The Case of the Cullinan Diamond" Daniel Bloomfield

8th Grade:

  • 1st place: "Buried Memories" by Isabelle McNett
  • 2nd place: "A Walk in the Woods" by Marian Griffiths
  • 3rd place: "A Hole in the Roof" by Cannon Lockburner

9th and 10th Grade:

  • 1st place: "Provocation" by Elaine Zou
  • 2nd place: "Blue Girls and Zombie Kits" by Riley Ferl
  • 3rd place: "The Ridge" by Angel Jimenez

11th and 12th Grade:

  • 1st place: "The Puppetmaster" by Sierra Montgomery
  • 2nd place: "Mystery of the Missing Happiness" by Evelyn Peake
  • 3rd place: "An Odious Case" by Christian Alvis

Winners will be contacted via email with information about their prizes.

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Kids STEM: Density Burrito

Supplies:

  • Tall, clear glass cylinder vase or container (preferably straight)
  • Food coloring
  • Measuring cup
  • Order of liquids needed for this density "burrito" (but you could do less liquid choices, but make sure to start with a heavy liquid and end with the lightest liquid):
    • Honey
    • Corn Syrup (add a couple drops of food coloring)
    • Maple Syrup
    • Whole Milk
    • Dish Soap
    • Water (add a couple drops of food coloring)
    • Vegetable Oil (add a couple drops of food coloring)
    • Rubbing Alcohol (add a couple drops of food coloring)
    • Lamp Oil (DO NOT add food coloring to this liquid - it's doesn't mix in.)
  • Tray
  • Turkey Baster
  • Items to sink or float: ping-pong ball, plastic beads, metal bolt, grape or cherry tomato, etc.

Directions:

  1. Determine how many ounces your container holds with room to spare at the top. Round up or down to a number that can easily be divided your number of liquid layers. Measure the exact amount of liquid ingredients into separate containers. (My large container held about 32 oz. leaving room at the top, so I divided 32 by 9, and then rounded the number down to a 1/3 c. of each liquid to make it easy to measure. Have a grown-up help you, especially with the lamp oil.)
  2. Place the large container on the tray.
  3. Add the liquids IN ORDER (they go from most dense to least dense).
  4. Starting with the honey, pour it very slowly so that it doesn't touch the sides of the container.
  5. Next, very slowly, dribble the corn syrup on top of the honey. Don't let it touch the sides of the container either.
  6. Again like the first two, slowly dribble the maple syrup into the container on top of the corn syrup.
  7. Using the turkey baster, add the milk very slowly. Now it helps to pour the liquids slowly down the sides of the container as you add them. You will add the next five liquids in the same manner.
  8. When all the liquids are in place. Add items and watch them sink or float or get stuck, depending on their weight and the density of the liquid where it stops.

Watch this project at: https://youtu.be/QjEYa6xBVRQ?list=PLMEg2Dd0dSFctLfDQxsL5SmuE8zkwQFmu

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Kids MAKE: Ninja Warriors


Supplies:


  • 3 chenille stems for each figure
  • 1 wooden bead big enough to be the head – 5/8 to 3/4 inch
  • 1 or 2 regular-sized colored plastic drinking straws for each figure
  • 5 pony beads for each figure
  • Small wire cutters
  • Scissors
  • Ruler
  • Permanent markers for the face
  • Glue
  • Optional: Yarn, extra chenille stems, felt scraps, or other decorative items


Directions:

  1. Take one of the chenille stems and twist it around the other two about 2/3 of the way up; twist about three times, or enough so that they will not unwind. (See #1 picture below)
  2. Slide 3 pony beads over both of the “legs” up to the twist you made.
  3. With the permanent marker, draw a face on the bead; then slide the bead down over the middle two stems.(See #2 picture)
  4. Cut off some of the excess stem above the bead, but leave enough to coil it into a bun. Use a little glue to glue the bun flat to the “head.” (Alternate method: Cut several strands of yarn for hair and twist the excess stem over it to hold it in place.)
  5. With the scissors, snip eight sections of colored straw about 1 ¼ inches long.
  6. Slide two of the sections over the “arms.” Twist the part of the stem that is sticking out to form mitten-type hands with thumbs. Tuck the excess stem back into the straw. (See #3 and #4 pictures)
  7. Slide a section of the straw over each “leg;” add a pony bead, and then the other section of straw. Form the part of the stem that is sticking out into a big foot so your figure can stand up. Tuck the excess stem back into the straw.
  8. If you want, you can decorate your figure with extra chenille stems, felt, yarn, or whatever you happen to have. You can make warriors, princesses, superheroes, knights – anything you want! (See #5 picture)
ninja 1
ninja 2
ninja 3
ninja 4
ninja 5

Watch this project at: https://youtu.be/UnGxbypCuBw?list=PLMEg2Dd0dSFctLfDQxsL5SmuE8zkwQFmu

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Kids STEM: Bubble Magic

Supplies:

For solution:

  • Clean container, big enough to hold your solution
  • Distilled water (tap water will work but distilled water is best)
  • Dishwashing liquid like Dawn
  • Glycerin
  • White sugar

For Bubble cube:

  • 7 pipe cleaners, cut in half
  • 12 plastic straws, each one cut to fit a pipe cleaner half, with about ¼-½” of pipe cleaner left exposed at each end
  • For the bubble blower, you’ll need a plastic pipette. Just snip ½” off the bulb end of the
    pipette. This is the end you’ll dip into the bubble solution.

Directions:

  1. Start with a clean container that will hold as much solution as you plan to make.
  2. Add distilled water (tap water can be substituted, but the minerals in it will affect the bubbles), in 1 cup increments.
  3. For each cup of distilled water, add 2 Tbsp of dishwashing liquid (original Dawn works really well).
  4. For each cup of distilled water, add 1 Tbsp of glycerin (grocery story grade, or pharmaceutical grade).
  5. For each cup of distilled water, add 1 tsp of white sugar.
  6. Gently stir the ingredients in the container, being careful not to make it frothy and bubbly.
  7. Cover the container and place it in the refrigerator overnight.

Meanwhile... make a bubble cube and a bubble blower for your Bubble Magic …

  1. Twist 3 of the pipe cleaner halves together at one end to make a triangular, pyramid-shaped component. Use 12 of the pipe cleaner halves to make a total of 4 of these three-legged pieces.
  2. Slide a piece of straw onto each pipe cleaner leg, leaving ¼-½”” sticking out of the open end.
  3. To build the cube, twist each pipe cleaner end on one component to the ends on another component. Continue connecting the legs until the cube is complete. Try to make the shape as even as possible.
  4. Use the last two pieces of pipe cleaner for handles by twisting each piece onto the cube at opposite corners. Curve the “handle” ends to make a shape that you can easily hold onto.

Now to make Bubble Magic …

  1. Get the cold bubble solution from the refrigerator, and carefully stir the mixture. Avoid making froth and bubbles. Whenever that forms on the top, take a minute to skim it off with a spoon so that you’ll get better bubbles with your cube.
  2. Dip your cube into the solution, letting it sit there for a few seconds, and lift it out by holding on to the two handles. Gently shake the cube so that the soap film can even itself out and excess solution can drip back into your container.
  3. Gently shake the cube again so that you can see a new shape, with a “square” bubble in the center. Be sure the “square” is horizontal so that you can see the square when you look down into the cube from above it.
  4. Set the cube gently on a flat surface to keep the bubble film stable while you prepare a bubble with your pipette bubble blower, or ask a friend to blow a bubble with the pipette.
  5. Blow a pipette bubble and gently drop it right into the center of the square. And ...

TA-DAH! The round bubble you dropped into the cube “magically” turned into a bulging cube … a square bubble. Now that’s Bubble Magic!
*You can also use your bubble cube as a wand. Submerse it in the solution, lift it out carefully, and holding the handles, “pull” it through the air. Watch for a trail of connected spherical shapes!

Watch this project at : https://youtu.be/iY_0gSND-40?list=PLMEg2Dd0dSFctLfDQxsL5SmuE8zkwQFmu

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Kids Make: Black Glue Butterflies

Supplies:

  • A piece of 8 ½ X 11 white cardstock
  • Watercolor paints
  • School glue
  • Small bottle of black acrylic craft paint
  • Small paintbrush
  • Cup of water for rinsing your paintbrush

Directions:

  1. Print the half butterfly image provided (see below) onto your cardstock. Fold the cardstock exactly in half and then unfold to make a crease in the middle. (Alternate method: Draw a butterfly picture onto half of your cardstock with a pencil putting the exact middle of the butterfly on the crease.)
  2. Make black glue by adding black acrylic craft paint to a small bottle of plain school glue until a dark, black color is achieved. Mix well.
  3. Using the tip of the glue nozzle, trace a fine line of glue onto all of the printed lines of the butterfly picture. Don’t use too much glue! Put the glue on only the half of the picture with the copied lines. Leave the other half blank.
  4. Fold the paper in half again while the glue is wet and press together gently. Then open up the cardstock. The pattern you traced will now be duplicated on the other half of the cardstock.
  5. Let the glue dry. You can speed up the process by using a blow dryer on low heat to gently dry the glue.
  6. When the glue is completely dry, use your watercolors to color in all of the white sections. You can decide which colors to use!

Oops! My butterfly isn’t exactly the same on both sides. That’s okay! Real butterflies’ wings aren’t exactly the same on both sides, either! Just like with people’s faces, one side is slightly different than the other.

Watch this project at: https://youtu.be/Gimm3roL-3Q

Comments: 1
Kids STEM: Firefly Jar

Supplies:

  • Clean, clear jar with lid
  • Thin glow stick
  • Scissors
  • Table covering or tray
  • Glitter (optional)

Directions:

  1. With a grown-up's help, cut the tip off the glow stick.
  2. Place the open end of the glow stick in the jar and shake it back and forth so that it splatters. Turn the jar as you splatter.
  3. Add a small pinch of glitter, sprinkling onto the sides of the jar where the splatters are.
  4. Cover with lid and take into a very dark room.

Fireflies are not flies but beetles and do exist in Colorado! They hang out by permanent water sources like ponds, lakes, and streams.

Watch this project at: https://youtu.be/LRNWJVQRFYw

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You have a voice! Today, all United States citizens can make their voices heard by voting in elections starting at age 18. But in the early years, only white men had suffrage – that means the right to vote. 2020 marks the 100th anniversary of the 19th Amendment of the Constitution, which guaranteed the vote to women as well. Many people worked hard to help secure suffrage rights. To learn more, check out these books for kids. Just click on the pdf link below:

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Kids Make: Sewing and Embroidering Fun

Supplies:

  • Embroidery or regular thread
  • Piece of cotton fabric or item made of cotton
  • Sewing needle
  • Scissors
  • Sharpie or other dark marker

Directions:

  1. Using a sharpie, mark dots on your fabric which will guide you as you sew your design.
  2. Thread your needle by pushing thread through the eye of the needle. Make a knot at the end of your piece of thread.
  3. Start on the wrong side of your fabric or on the inside of your item, and push the needle up through the fabric through your starting dot. Bring all the thread through, slowly, making sure the thread doesn't tangle.
  4. Go to the next dot in your design and push the needle down through that dot, bringing all the thread through again.
  5. Continue until your first design is complete. Finish your design by weaving your needle through the thread on the wrong side of the fabric several times, making a couple loops so the thread will be secure. Cut the thread.
  6. Re-thread for the next design or continue if you have enough thread on your needle.
  7. Enjoy your original design!

Watch this project at: https://youtu.be/5tX-0F2bAsA

Comments: 0
Kids STEM: Ice Volcanoes

Supplies:

  • Baking soda (1/3 c.)
  • Vinegar
  • Small bowl
  • Golf ball or other small ball that sinks and doesn't float
  • Tray
  • Paper towels
  • Warm water (1 cup)
  • Plastic wrap
  • Food coloring

Directions:

  1. Put a golf ball in a small bowl. Cover both the ball and bowl with plastic wrap, making sure the wrap hangs out over the edge. Push the plastic wrap down around the ball.
  2. Mix a third cup baking soda into one cup of warm water and add food coloring. Mix well.
  3. Pour the mixture into the small bowl and over and around the golf ball. Make sure you cover the ball with the baking soda/water mixture. You may need to spoon in some of the baking soda that sits at the bottom of the bowl of warm water.
  4. Place the bowl in a flat place in the freezer. Freeze for at least 4 hrs.
  5. When frozen solid, place the bowl in warm water so the ice comes loose. Place on a tray and lift the volcano out of the bowl. Pry out the golf ball with a spoon and carefully remove the plastic wrap.
  6. Spoon on some vinegar and watch the icy volcano. This project is fun to do outside.
  7. Refreeze your volcano for another day, if there's anything left.

Watch this video at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wo3tfS85M4k&list=PLMEg2Dd0dSFctLfDQxsL5S...

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Kids Make: Eric Carle Inspired Painted Collage Mobile

Supplies:

  • Tablecloth
  • Paints (any kind, or water colors could work too)
  • Paintbrushes (any kind)
  • Paint tray
  • Tissue paper or construction paper (three sheets of different colors or just white works too)
  • Cardboard
  • Glue or Mod Podge
  • Yarn or string
  • Scissors
  • Dowel(s) or a coat hanger or a branch with yarn or string tied on.
  • Scissors

Directions:

  1. Cover your workspace with a table cloth or newspaper.
  2. Spread out your tissue paper (or construction paper).
  3. Apply paint to the tissue paper in broad strokes, (no need to cover the entire tissue paper with wet paint.) After the first color is dry, add another color. Let dry again before adding another color. Add designs too, like swirls or zigzags. Let tissue paper dry.
  4. Take cardboard and draw large shapes like a star, crescent moon, square, circle, etc. Cut out the shapes.
  5. When tissue paper is dry, tear into smaller pieces (but not tiny pieces).
  6. Water down some glue or use Mod Podge to cover a cardboard piece, then place a piece of painted tissue paper onto the glued piece of cardboard. Trim any excess tissue paper. Paint glue over the tissue paper too. Repeat with several shapes and allow all pieces to dry.
  7. With a grown-up's help, poke a hole at one end of each cardboard shape. Using different lengths of string or yarn, string up your shapes.
  8. Hang your stringed shapes from your branch or dowel. If you're using two dowels, you can tie them together first by crossing them and tying string or yarn where they intersect.
  9. Adjust your hanging shapes along the dowel so that it's balanced when it hangs. Hang your mobile art up for all to admire.

Watch this project at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tl79U5s4GrA&list=PLMEg2Dd0dSFctLfDQxsL5S...

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Pikes Peak Library District Foundation Named in $2 Million Dollar Bequest

Pikes Peak Library District Foundation is honored to receive $150,000 from the estate of Milt and Darlene Johnson.

As we have come to learn, Milt was what we at PPLD would refer to as a “power user.” While serving as the pharmacist at Broadmoor Drug at The Broadmoor Hotel, Milt often worked the 4-11 p.m. shift. With Dar teaching during the day, Milt became a mainstay at our Penrose Library where he spent countless hours educating himself on investments and investment strategies, pouring over resources such as The Wall Street Journal, the Financial Times, and Barron’s.

After he retired, Milt continued to visit the library almost daily and used the knowledge he gained at the library to build and grow his and Darlene’s investment portfolio. In fact, Milt became such a subject matter expert that many of the investment advisors he and Darlene used often called Milt for advice. We are grateful to be a recipient of their generosity, which based on this story, is due in part to the time Milt spent at Penrose Library. PPLD’s mission is to provide resources and opportunities that impact individual lives and build community, and we cannot think of a more compelling story that demonstrates the impact of patrons connecting with library resources and in this case quite literally building our community.

PPLD and the PPLD Foundation are truly grateful to Darlene and Milt for including the library as part of the imprint these gifts will forever leave on our region, and we are deeply touched by Darlene’s gesture to make the gift to PPLD in Milt’s memory. The PPLD Foundation was created in 2003 to raise philanthropic funds and build an endowment to support our 15 libraries and the more than 650,000 people we serve. PPLD ranks 10th out of Colorado’s 13 largest library systems in funding per person, and the PPLD Foundation was created to accept meaningful, generous gifts like Darlene’s. It is donations large and small that helps PPLD close our funding gap and continue providing resources and opportunities that impact individual lives and build community. We are truly sorry to have lost Darlene and Milt, but these gifts will ensure their legacy is forever remembered.

Read more about the Johnsons and their estate in The Gazette's coverage here.

Photo credit: Joe Hollmann and the City of Colorado Springs


For more information on how you can include PPLD in your estate planning and create your own lasting legacy, contact Lance James at (719) 531-6333, x6890, or email foundation@ppld.org.

Learn more about the work of the PPLD Foundation.

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Streaming History Series

In commemoration of Colorado History, join Regional History and Genealogy staff members as we view selected Rocky Mountain PBS Colorado Experience documentaries. Watch award-winning documentaries and chat about our state's unique history. Participants will learn about our state and community from the comfort of your home.

Register for one intriguing topic or the whole series. Click here to register for the whole series.

Registration is required.


Topics

Glen Eyrie Castle

  • Mon., Aug. 10 at 6:30 p.m.
  • Click here to register.

Enter the fascinating history of Colorado Springs’ founding estate. How did a refined English Tudor-style castle come to exist in the vast, unsettled West? Created by railroad tycoon and Civil War General William Jackson Palmer, Glen Eyrie Castle is adjacent to Garden of the Gods and the iconic views of Pikes Peak. Brand new archeological findings reveal intriguing details of castle life!


Ladies of the Mine

High altitude, groceries delivered by mule train, pack rats and spoiled Thanksgiving turkeys are just a few of the challenges faced by ladies living in Colorado's remote mining towns at the end of the 19th Century. Learn the stories of three inspirational women who held their own while surrounded by a harsh landscape and un-lady-like company.


Suffrage

On November 7, 1893, Colorado became the first state in the nation to grant women’s suffrage by a single issue popular vote, and the following year the first three female state legislators were elected. Meet the dedicated Colorado women that led this charge. Today, Colorado has the highest percentage of women in the state legislature.


KKK

From the Grand Dragon to known KKK appointees in the police, mayor and governor offices, Colorado once had the 2nd largest Ku Klux Klan membership in the United States. Discover the sordid history of the KKK in Colorado and the impact they had on Catholics, Jews and African Americans in early 1920s, and the courageous individuals who fought against their establishment.


Cheers to Beers!

The history of Colorado may best be seen through the bottom of a beer mug. From quenching the thirst of Gold Rush miners in the 1800's to modern craft brews pouring $3 billion into Colorado’s economy, beer has either borne witness to or helped create some of the most interesting chapters in the state’s history. Meet the pioneers of this now booming industry. Cheers!

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We hope you enjoy the 23rd edition of Stone Soup, published by the Adult Education Department of Pikes Peak Library District.

These stories are written by adult participants and volunteers. They are offered as submitted.

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Kids STEM:Hippopotamus Toothpaste

SUPPLIES AND INGREDIENTS:

  • ½ cup 49 Volume Hydrogen Peroxide (*3% solution, first aid quality, will work … it produces a smaller reaction)
  • 1 TBSP liquid dish soap
  • 1 packet (1 TBSP) Active Dry Yeast
  • 4 TBSP warm water
  • Plastic Cup for mixing yeast and water
  • Food coloring
  • Plastic soda bottle (*16 oz. - 1 liter)
  • Washable or protected work surface
  • Foil Tray with high sides and/or Larger cookie sheet or tray with sides
  • Funnel (optional)
  • *Safety goggles (*or … ski/snow goggles, swim goggles) … for general eye protection!

DIRECTIONS:

To make up a batch of hippopotamus toothpaste …

  1. Place the soda bottle in your tray(s) … on a washable, protected surface.
  2. Pour 150 ml (½ cup) of 40 Volume Hydrogen Peroxide into the soda bottle.
  3. (You might want to use a funnel for this!)

  4. Add 1 tablespoon of liquid dishwashing soap to the bottle.
  5. Pour the packet of yeast into the small cup.
  6. Pour 4 tablespoons of warm water over the yeast.
  7. Carefully swirl the cup around to further mix the yeast and water. *It should be the consistency of melted ice cream. Allow about 30 seconds. Add a bit more warm water, if needed.
  8. Dribble several stripes of food coloring down the inside of the soda bottle. This should produce stripes, just like you might see in real toothpaste.
  9. Pour the yeast solution into the soda bottle … and stand back! Watch the mixture expand and foam up.

*Once the chemical reaction is complete, you should have (mostly) just soapy water and yeast. However, if you used the Volume 40 product, and some of the peroxide was unreached in the experiment, it could irritate skin and eyes. For that reason, it’s
recommended that you don’t play with the foam! And DON’T BRUSH ANY TEETH WITH THIS FOAM!

How It Works …

Each tiny foam bubble in this chemical reaction is filled with oxygen. The yeast is a catalyst, a substance that speeds up a reaction. It quickly broke apart the oxygen from the hydrogen peroxide … and that created lots and lots of bubbles! Your experiment not only created bubbles, but also heat … that makes it an EXOTHERMIC reaction.

Clean Up …

It’s safe to use a sponge to wipe up foam from your table surface, and just wash the remaining liquid and foam from the bottle and tray down the sink drain.

Watch this project at: https://youtu.be/N91i9ih62ZM?list=PLMEg2Dd0dSFctLfDQxsL5SmuE8zkwQFmu

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