Banned Books Week 2019

Banned Books Week 2019

Censorship leaves us in the dark - Keep the Light On!

Come celebrate Banned Books Week at PPLD! Learn about:

  • National banned books from years past
  • Challenged books and media at your very own Library District
  • And events to shed light on the challenge of book censorship

The Top 10 (11) National List

The ALA Office for Intellectual Freedom tracked 347 challenges to library, school, and university materials and services in 2018. Of the 483 books challenged or banned in 2018, the Top 11 Most Challenged Books are:

  1. George by Alex Gino
    • Reasons: banned, challenged, and relocated because it was believed to encourage children to clear browser history and change their bodies using hormones, and for mentioning “dirty magazines,” describing male anatomy, “creating confusion,” and including a transgender character.
  2. banned books ala

  3. A Day in the Life of Marlon Bundo by Jill Twiss, illustrated by EG Keller
    • Reasons: banned and challenged for including LGBTQIA+ content, and for political and religious viewpoints.
  4. Captain Underpants series written and illustrated by Dav Pilkey
    • Reasons: series was challenged because it was perceived as encouraging disruptive behavior, while Captain Underpants and the Sensational Saga of Sir Stinks-A-Lot was challenged for including a same-sex couple.
  5. The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas
    • Reasons: banned and challenged because it was deemed “anti-cop,” and for profanity, drug use, and sexual references.
  6. Drama written and illustrated by Raina Telgemeier
    • Reasons: banned and challenged for including LGBTQIA+ characters and themes.
  7. Thirteen Reasons Why by Jay Asher
    • Reasons: banned, challenged, and restricted for addressing teen suicide.
  8. This One Summer by Mariko Tamaki, illustrated by Jillian Tamaki
    • Reasons: banned and challenged for profanity, sexual references, and certain illustrations.
  9. Skippyjon Jones series written and illustrated by Judy Schachner
    • Reason: challenged for depicting stereotypes of Mexican culture.
  10. The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian by Sherman Alexie
    • Reasons: banned and challenged for sexual references, profanity, violence, gambling, and underage drinking, and for its religious viewpoint.
  11. This Day in June by Gayle E. Pitman, illustrated by Kristyna Litten
    • Reason: challenged and burned for including LGBTQIA+ content.
  12. Two Boys Kissing by David Levithan
    • Reason: challenged and burned for including LGBTQIA+ content.

Challenges at PPLD
Since the 70's PPLD has had 310 challenges to books, magazines, movies, and other media. Many of these you may no longer find in our Catalog but we assure you, it was not because they were challenged. Over the years, as media has shifted more to digital platforms, we simply cannot carry everything!
banned books ppld

  1. Don’t Call Me Little Bunny by Gregoire Solotareff
    • Reasons: violence, gangs (5 challenges)
    • Summary: (1987) Jack, the Little Bunny, doesn't like being called that and he doesn't think being the smallest rabbit is much fun, either. Why can't he be a normal rabbit with a normal name just like everyone else?
  2. Gay Ideas: Outing and Other Controversies by Richard Mohr
    • Reasons: Homosexuality (5 challenges)
    • Summary: (1992) Philosopher Richard Mohr's articulate exposition of the moral dilemmas facing the gay community, Gay Ideas, addresses, in diverse and often shocking ways, how gays ought to represent and position themselves in the face of an increasingly threatening climate of homophobia, repression, and violence. Includes 36 illustrations.
  3. Miss America by Howard Stern
    • Reasons: Sexually explicit (4 challenges)
    • Summary: (1995) Shock-jock radio host Howard Stern shares his own offbeat, outrageous views, and offensive observations on life, the world, modern American society—and more.
  4. The Anarchist Cookbook by William Powell
    • Reasons: Drugs, alcohol, smoking, violence (3 challenges)
    • Summary: (1971) Contains instructions for the manufacture of explosives, rudimentary telecommunications phreaking devices, and related weapons, as well as instructions for home manufacturing of illicit drugs, including LSD.
  5. Animalia by Graeme Base
    • Reasons: occult/satanism (2 challenges)
    • Summary: (1993) A noted artist presents an imaginative, whimsical journey through the letters of the alphabet, in a beautifully illustrated book that introduces a menagerie of familiar and exotic creatures.
  6. banned books chart

  7. Aperture Magazine
    • Reasons: Nudity, sexually explicit (2 challenges)
    • Summary: (1952) Based in New York City, is an international quarterly journal specializing in photography. Aperture magazine is the flagship publication of Aperture Foundation.
  8. The Bear and the Fly by Paula Winter
    • Reasons: Unsuited for age group, violence (2 challenges)
    • Summary: (1976) A bear tries to catch a fly with disastrous results.
  9. Glory Hole Murders by Tony Fennelly
    • Reasons: Offensive language, homosexuality (2 challenges)
    • Summary: (1985) The gay, New Orleans aristocrat, Matt Sinclair, solves a murder of a supposedly straight family man in the men's foom of a gay bar.
  10. Grandpa's Witched Up Christmas by James Flora
    • Reasons: Unsuitable for age group (2 challenges)
    • Summary: (2018) When Grandpa was a boy, the most terrible thing happened to him the day before Christmas. While taking a shortcut through the woods, he met three fearsome witches. One, with sharp teeth and hair like an un-mowed lawn, pointed her finger at him, squealed, "Sha-zam!" and turned him into a snake. The second witch, who didn't have any feet, turned him into a turkey buzzard. And the third-tall and warty-screamed, "Ta-pooty!" and changed him into a pig. Home he ran, but his parents wouldn't let him in.
  11. banned books chart

  12. I Wish I had a Pirate Suit by Pamela Allen
    • Reasons: Nudity (2 challenges)
    • Summary: (1991) When Peter wears his pirate suit, his little brother had better beware--because Peter is the captain and his little brother is the crew. But there's one thing for little brother to look forward to, and that's the day Peter outgrows his pirate suit . . . and his galley slave becomes captain. Full-color illustrations.
  13. Lost in the Store by Larry Bograd
    • Reasons: Unsuitable for age group (2 challenges)
    • Summary: (1981) Bruno is worried when he becomes separated from his parents in a large department store, until he meets Molly, who shows him the joys of being lost.
  14. Lucy Dove by Janice Del Negro
    • Reasons: Occult/satanism (2 challenges)
    • Summary: (2001) While sewing the laird's trews by moonlight in a haunted churchyard in return for a sackful of gold, an aging seamstress outwits a terrible monster.
  15. Secrets, Spells, & Curious Charms by Monika Beisner
    • Reasons: Occult/satanism (2 challenges)
    • Summary: (1985) This illustrated compilation of rhyming spells, chants, and incantations draws on traditional lore from around the world.
  16. Sweet Movie by Maran Film
    • Reasons: Sexually explicit (2 challenges)
    • Summary: (1974) The winner (Carole Laure) of the Miss World Virginity contest marries, escapes from her masochistic husband, and ends up involved in a world of debauchery.
  17. Who Framed Roger Rabbit? by Steven Spielberg
    • Reasons: Unsuited for age group, sexually explicit (2 challenges)
    • Summary: (1988) Down-on-his-luck private eye Eddie Valiant gets hired by cartoon producer R.K. Maroon to investigate an adultery scandal involving Jessica Rabbit, the sultry wife of Maroon's biggest star, Roger Rabbit. But when Marvin Acme, Jessica's alleged paramour and the owner of Toontown, is found murdered, the villainous Judge Doom vows to catch and destroy Roger.
  18. The Boy Who Ate Around by Henrik Drescher
    • Reasons: Unsuited for age group (2 challenges)
    • Summary: (1994) After Mo refuses to eat his supper of cheese souffle and string beans, he turns into a ferocious monster and eats his parents. He then proceeds to eat everything--everything but the cheese souffle and string beans. Mo transforms himself into increasingly monstrous monsters as he eats his way through his home and neighborhood, the country, the world, until he is left hanging from the moon.



Virtual Read-Out
Your words have power. Stand up to censorship and declare your literary freedoms by reading from a banned book or discussing censorship issues on camera!
Click here for more information!


Banned Book Weeks Events:
Some events require registration.

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