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Old Colorado City Library (OL)

Old Colorado City Library

Address:
2418 West Pikes Peak Ave - map it!
Colorado Springs, CO 80904

Phone: (719) 634-1698
Contact Us

Hours:
Monday - Thursday: 9 a.m. - 9 p.m.
Friday and Saturday: 10 a.m. - 6 p.m.
Sunday: Closed
Holiday Hours and Closures

Bus Route: 3

  • Friends of Old Colorado City Library
  • Old Colorado City Library Facebook

Friends of Old Colorado City Library

The Old Colorado City Friends Book Store is open during regular Library hours.

Meetings are on the 3rd Saturday of January, April, July, and October.

Click here to learn more about the Friends of the Pikes Peak Library District.


 

What's New!

Purr Me a Story!

What could be more happy than curling up with a cat and a book? How about children curling up with a cat and a book?

Happy Cats Haven is excited to host the Purr Me a Story program, a collaboration with Cheyenne Mountain Library and Old Colorado City Library. Our cats and kittens will welcome children into their colony rooms with books provided by PPLD.

Reading out loud builds reading confidence while giving our happy cats family time with the children while they wait to be adopted. Smiles and purrs will abound!

What: Purr Me a Story
When: Sunday, December 11, 1 - 3 p.m.
Where: Happy Cats Haven, 1412 S. 21st St., Colorado Springs, CO 80904

Ages 7-12 are welcome (with a parent or guardian). Call Happy Cats Haven at (719) 362-4600 to pick your 30 minute time slot and sign up!

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10th Annual Teen Art Contest

Art is transformational. Paint, ink, and canvas turn into an image that touches lives through the years. We want to see your take on the theme Transformation this year. Show us how art impacts your life, or how it transforms the world around you.

How to Enter

Guidelines

  • Must be in grades 6 - 12 in March of 2017
  • Must be an El Paso County resident
  • Only one entry per person
  • Jurors reserve the right to decline inappropriate entries
  • Entries must be two-dimensional and no more than two inches deep, including frame. Any textural elements (glued-on items such as pencils, pennies, etc.) must be inside a frame to prevent damage.
  • If you want to display at Library 21c, art must be able to be displayed in a way that is compatible with a wire hanging system.
  • Since we have to transport the artwork between locations, frames or matting are highly encouraged for the protection of all pieces. We are very careful, but frames and matting help protect your pieces even more!

FAQ

When will I know if I have won?
We will notify participants by mid-March if they have won an award. All participants and their friends and family are invited to the Awards Ceremony on Sunday, April 2 at 2 p.m. at Library 21c in the Venue regardless of if they won an award.

Will my artwork be displayed?
Yes! You can choose from one of three locations to have your artwork displayed during the month of April. Locations are Penrose, East, or Library 21c.

When can I pick up my artwork?What are the prizes?
We award prizes for Coordinator’s Choice, 1st place, and 2nd place for the high school and middle school age groups. We also award a prize for Best in Show, which is the piece that received the highest score out of both Middle and High School. In the past, winners received a drawing mannequin and gift card to Meininger’s Art Supply store.

What can I do to improve my chances at winning?

  • Work with the theme—It doesn’t have to be a literal interpretation, but we do look for pieces that have been inspired by the theme in some way. Your paragraph describing your piece can have a big impact on this.
  • Stand out! Whether through subject matter or unusual take on the theme, we notice unique entries more. For example, we tend to get a lot of close-ups on eyes, so they tend to not stand out as much.
  • Have fun! Don’t view it as an assignment or chore. We can tell when teens submit pieces they are passionate about—so do something that you love!

Do I have to have a frame?
No, but we highly encourage it. Pieces are not judged on if a frame is present or not, but frames help protect your artwork during storage and transportation.

My question wasn’t answered here.
Email Becca at rphilipsen@ppld.org or comment on this blog post!

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Add Your Book Review to PPLD.orgHave you read a really great (or really bad) book lately? Tell us all about it! Just fill out this book review form and your review will be posted in the Book Reviews section of ppld.org.

Happy reviewing!

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Pizza for a Cause

Dear Library Patron,

We love being in your neighborhood – and like any good neighbor, we want to support our fellow families and friends. We are excited to provide all Pikes Peak Library District supporters with a CPK Philanthropizza Card.

Every time you use this card, 20%* of your net food and beverage purchases will be donated back to Pikes Peak Library District. It’s easy – the more you visit CPK, the more money we donate. It makes raising money to support your organization’s efforts a piece of cake…or pizza!

All you need to do is visit our CPK location in The Promenade Shops at Briargate November 1, 2016 through February 28, 2017 and present the Philanthropizza card to your server at the end of your meal. Cards are available at all PPLD locations. Dine in the restaurant with us, try take-out or catering; any way you order helps the library. Either way, we look forward to seeing you very soon.

If you haven’t been in to see us recently, be sure to check out our newly reimagined menu featuring fresh, seasonally inspired ingredients and inventive Main Plates like a new Fire-Grilled Ribeye, Hearth-Roasted Halibut, and our new Lunch Duos. Drink the unique as well with our hand-crafted cocktails and selection of regional beers and California premium wines. Of course, the classic hand-tossed artisan pizzas and unique pastas and salads you love are still here.

Sincerely,

Your California Pizza Kitchen Neighbors
1645 Briargate Parkway Suite 203
Colorado Springs, CO 80920

Philanthropizza Cards are valid at The Promenade Shops at Briargate, November 1, 2016 through February 28, 2017.

For questions, please contact Isabel Soto-Luna at msoto-luna@ppld.org or (719) 884-9812.

*Tax, gratuity, gift card and retail purchases excluded.

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Human Library

Do you have a story to share?
Become a living book in our Human Library!

The Human Library is a concept created by the Danish youth organization Stop The Violence in 2000. It is now operational on five continents. A library of human beings, the Human Library is a collection of people from all walks of life. Individuals serve as human ‘books’ and participants can ‘read’ the book by engaging in a conversation with the book on loan. The Human Library aims to establish a safe conversational space where difficult questions are expected, appreciated, and hopefully answered.

PPLD is seeking books to help us cultivate our Human Library. To apply to be a Human Library book, click here for the online application or print out the application below and bring it to any library location. Applications due December 10, 2016.

PPLD will host a Human Library event on Sunday, March 19 at 1 p.m. at Penrose Library, 20 N. Cascade Ave.

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Deb Bartos

PPLD's Artist in Residence for September and October 2016 was Deb Bartos, an oil painter who loves exploring the natural world and teaching students about color. She continues to develop her knowledge about how light and color work together, and is fascinated by the process.

Visit PPLD's Maker/Artist in Residence page for more information about this program.

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It's Back to School Time!

PPLD would like to wish all our students and parents a great school year. Here are some resources we offer to help with your studies:

And of course, you can always chat with a librarian by clicking the "Chat Now!" button, or email us at Ask a Librarian.

Good luck out there!

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Shake those wiggles out and have some fun with music and movement activities and a story! Join us for a very special storytime involving music and movement, aimed at ages 2 and 3. Caregivers and children participate through movement to songs and rhymes. A fun one-on-one time with your child while fostering learning, coordination and a love of music.

Where: Cheyenne Mountain Library
When: Tuesdays, 10:30 a.m

Where: Library 21c
When: Wednesdays, 9:30, 10:15, and 11 a.m.

Where: Manitou Springs Library
When: 3rd Thursdays, 10:30 a.m.

Where: Penrose Library
When: Fridays, 10:30 a.m.

Where: Ruth Holley Library
When: 2nd and 3rd Fridays, 10:30 a.m.

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Pikes Peak Library District is proud to introduce our new website!

New ppld.org has the same basic layout of information as the old site, but with

  • Bonus content and features
  • Improved functionality
  • Updated look and feel
  • Mobile friendly design

Please take a few minutes to watch this short video about what our new website has to offer:

Please take some time to look around and contact us with any questions or comments.

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Congratulations to the winners of our first All Pikes Peak Writes, PPLD's adult fiction writing contest. The victors were announced at Mountain of Authors on Saturday, April 23.

1st Place
“Sub-Zero” by Lizbeth Tarpy
1st place prizes include: year’s subscription to Writer’s Digest Magazine, copy of Writer’s Market 2016, and Livescribe 2GB Echo Smartpen

2nd Place
“Journey by Train” by Susan Eitemiller
2nd place prizes include: year’s subscription to Writer’s Digest Magazine and copy of Writer’s Market 2016

3rd Place
“Tea Party” by Heidi Balaraman
3rd place prizes include: year’s subscription to Writer’s Digest Magazine

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Sarah Pottenger, Winner My Westside-Our Voice Essay Contest

Old Colorado City Library is pleased to announce the winners of our essay contest, My Westside--Our Voice. Our generous Friends of the Library supported this programming with a $100 prize for first place. The winner, Sarah Pottenger, is also published in the November 21, 2013 edition of the Westside Pioneer. Enjoy reading her essay along with our runners-up, Andrea Corley and Victor Shepard.

Your Westside is My Westside Now, by Sarah Pottenger - Winner

I’m a third-generation Colorado Springs native, and I’ve never wanted to live anywhere else. I grew up near Academy Boulevard, but some of my best memories are of visits to the Westside, whether to visit my parents’ old haunts, see the house where my grandmother was born, or just to take the car to the mechanic. Driving to the Westside was an event, taking half an hour.

I lived in that same house off Academy for twenty years. Then my family downsized from our house to a duplex just north of Old Colorado City. We moved here in 2010, and though it was a terrible move, we were here. For my parents, returning to the Westside was like coming home. For me, it was a dream come true. Every week one of us remarks that we still can’t believe we get to live here, even after nearly four years.

As a lifelong reader, I love the Old Colorado City Library. We can drive there in just a few minutes, or walk in half an hour. I probably visit three times a week, and it’s the prettiest, friendliest library in town. We’re also just minutes away from Fire Station #5, housing the wonderful firefighters who not only came to our rescue when my bedroom flooded during the September 12 storm, but also arrived within moments when my dad suffered a heart attack right before Christmas last year.

When we were children, my brother and I loved to come to the Westside. The Creamery was (and still is) our favorite ice cream shop. We liked to visit souvenir stores, dipping our hands into wooden bins brimming with polished rocks. My parents pointed out houses belonging to friends and relatives. My mom told stories about running downhill from school and spending nights with her grandparents, one set on Chestnut and one set on Uintah.

I have always loved it here. I pinch myself every day, hardly believing that I get to live here, that every time the car heads west, I’m going home.

The Circle in the Square, by Victor Shepard - Runner-Up

It’s funny how memories work. The passing of fifty five or so years doesn't diminish the desire to somehow recapture the beauty and love that were experienced so long ago. I know the ice cream was much sweeter and creamier then. The flowers my grandma raised were much more fragrant than flowers are today. And most definitely people were so much kinder then. People didn't have the apprehension and distance that is so prevalent today. At least that’s the way I choose to remember it.

Every child looks forward to summer and my summers always included visiting my grandmother in the “burg” of Colorado City. This was the main highlight of every summer and a time that I remember fondly. Grandma’s house was only a block away from the library where I read the adventures of the places I was going to visit one day when I was “old.” In close proximity were the drug stores with real fountains like Cooper-Lidke and the Rexall, a good place to get a chocolate or cherry Coke. Then I’d buy a fifteen cent wooden plane at the Duckwalls, which would last about ten minutes. In the center of this playground neighborhood was a park to play in with a central square and the treasure of the town, the first capitol of Colorado. This park was a hub where the entire neighborhood was welcomed and encouraged to come to.

Wednesday nights in the “burg” were the most special because that was the night when there was square dancing in the park. Although I was only six or seven, it was a weekly ritual that included special food and more importantly, staying up late. I’d get to wear my little cowboy boots and western shirt and get pinches from my grandma’s friends. Watching the big people in their fancy clothes, swiftly moving through difficult dance maneuvers, was quite a sight. But they all seemed happy and certainly appeared to be having a good time. Eventually, the inevitable happened, grandma wanted me to ask a very apprehensive little girl to dance. I was not a completely willing participant in the process but the coaxing finally compelled us wee ones to join in the confusing mob moving to an old man’s call on a screechy microphone. We were both confused and afraid of being trampled by the big people as they sashayed and promenaded around in close order. Somehow we devised our own rhythm and moves and somehow managed to avoid serious contact and injury. The more time we spent dancing the more fun it became. The dance seemed to last late into the night, and I must have been especially tired, as my grandma was forced to carry me home.

Yes, memories can cause us to smile and dancing can still wear me out but I wouldn't trade a moment I've experienced for half a dollar. I still love the park, the band shell and the fistful of valuable and memorable experiences that Bancroft Park has given me throughout many happy years.

Lower Gold Camp Road Today "Ties", by Andrea Corley - Runner-Up

I am a transplant, not a native Westsider. I came here to college and really never left. I have lived in the same place on the Westside for 46 years. I married a local man with Westside ties – railroad ties. His grandfather bought one of the railroads that traveled through the Westside to Cripple Creek a century ago, tore it up, sold the rolling stock and made a toll road for automobiles on the CS&CCDRY bed. It is now called the Gold Camp Road.

Yesterday, driving with a friend on Lower Gold Camp Road, we passed the ground-breaking for a new facility east of my friend’s home at The Village at Skyline. She did not know what is to be built there, but reading the current Westside Pioneer I learned it is to be a memory facility called Morning Star at Bear Creek. I thought” how fitting” in an area full of my family’s memories. The road we were traveling on next to this new facility was once-upon-a-time the initial part of what was called the Corley Mountain Highway. It was gently graded for train traffic first, as the route west out of Colorado Springs to the foothills for the railroad nicknamed ( because it was) the Short Line to Cripple Creek. Now a city street, Lower Gold Camp Road has become, according to Bill Vogrin in the Gazette, a race track for prospective buyers testing their new cars.

Next time you are there, testing or not, imagine the trains going and coming on that very roadway, loaded with freight or gold ore depending on the direction of travel, plains or mountains up ahead, tracks and ties, not tires, underneath you. Then, remember the clickety-clack rhythm of any train ride you have taken, and this becomes Time Travel for the Twenty-first Century with memories of your own. For me, a transplant in my adopted neighborhood, it becomes ties to my family members in their own time and place.

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