InformationAll library facilities will be closed Sunday, April 5. Happy Easter!

Old Colorado City Library

Old Colorado City Library

Old Colorado Library FacebookAddress:
2418 West Pikes Peak Ave
Colorado Springs, CO
80904
A History of the Carnegie Building

Old Colorado City Library PearltreesPhone: (719) 634-1698

Hours:
Mon. - Thurs.: 9 a.m. - 9 p.m.
Fri. and Sat.: 10 a.m. - 6 p.m.
Sun.: Closed
Holiday Hours and Closures

Friends of the Old Colorado City Library

Bus Route: 3

FREE Wireless!
Laptop Loans


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Friends of Old Colorado City Library

The Old Colorado City Friends Book Store is open during regular Library hours.

Meetings are on the 3rd Saturday of January, April, July and October.

Click here to learn more about the Friends of the Pikes Peak Library District.


 

What's New!

Book Madness! Final 4!

Whoa! Only four remain standing! Keep voting for your favorites!

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Patti Smithsonian – Puppeteer
Shadow puppets animate worldwide legends from Ancient Greece to Native America.

Bruce Black – Magician presents “The Magic of Reading”
A magical ride through the world of literature with a special salute to Dr. Seuss.

  • Mon., March 23 at 10:30 a.m. at High Prairie Library
  • Thu., March 26 at 10:30 a.m. at Business of Art Center, 513 Manitou Ave., Manitou Springs

Up in the Air with Peter Davison
Juggling, dance, and theater transform the stage into a world of motion!

Katherine Dines and Hunk•Ta•Bunk•Ta Music
A performance packed with movement, sign language, sing-alongs, zany props, and story songs.

Alanna Jones – Coyote and the Yodeling Cowboy Puppet Show
Watch how Coyote tricks the yodeling Colorado Cowboy with the help of his friend, Tumbleweed.

Connie Elstun with Bunnies and Birdies
Smiles abound in this family-friendly program with magician Connie Elstun and her hilarious costumed rabbits.

Cluck! Cluck! Chickens …
Join Laura Foye and her chickens as you learn how to care for them, pet a sweet chicken, and make your own chicken creations!

Neil McIntyre Celebrates Dr. Seuss
Experience Dr. Seuss in a way that will get everybody groovin’.

Creepy Crawlies with Rowen Monks
Creepy Crawly wrangler Rowen Monks is back with amazing arachnids, hissing cockroaches, scorpions, and who knows what!

Preschool Dance Party
Children ages five and younger (and their grownups) are invited to come dance, hop, and boogie to the beat!

Jazzamatazz
Familiar children’s sing-alongs, movement, and live music with Barb and Ryan. A hopping good time for children ages 1 - 8 and their young-at-heart adults.

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Denver Comic Con logo

Are you a child or teen who is a comic book aficionado or graphic novel guru? One who spends her free time sketching caped crusaders, alien landscapes, giant robots, otherworldly creatures, and other kinds of super-powered art? You are exactly the type of kid and teen who should submit to the first-ever Pop Culture Classroom (PCC) Kids Comics Contest, which offers young artists the chance to show off their talents during Denver Comic Con 2015 and beyond!

Along with a pair of 3-day passes to Denver Comic Con (DCC) 2015, contest winners will have their artwork prominently featured in the official DCC 2015 souvenir program and admired by thousands of Con attendees. Additional prizes include exhibition of artist’s work on the PCC website and a special meet-and-greet session with a professional kids comics artist.

The PCC Kids Comics contest is open from March 24th to April 13th to all ages and students. Five contest winners will be chosen from all contestants and announced by April 30, 2015. PCC will also be selecting non-winning entries for inclusion in our PCC yearbook, which will be published at a later date.

Artwork & Submission Requirements
-Artwork must be in the form of a comic or graphic text.
-Submissions can be any length. If the winner’s artwork is more than one page, we will print the first page of the comic in the DCC souvenir program, with the rest located on our PCC website.
-Email artwork to contest@popcultureclassroom.org (highly preferred). If possible, please scan artwork in color, at 300dpi, and send as a PDF or JPG or send via “snail mail” to PCC’s offices at 1391 N Speer Blvd, Suite 360, Denver, Colorado 80204.
-Deadline for contest entry is April 13st @ 12 noon (MT).

Go to Pop Culture Classroom for more info. For questions regarding the contest, please email PCC at info@popcultureclassroom.org. They look forward to reading and enjoying the submissions from our fabulous young library patrons!

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Call for Makers and Artists

The makerspaces contained in Library 21c of Pikes Peak Library District are generating creativity, innovation, and learning. To foster these endeavors, PPLD has crated a Maker/Artist in Residence Program. If you enjoy teaching people new skills, we would love to hear from you!

We are currently looking for makers and artists who are able to participate any time between the end of June through the end of 2015.

The call closes Thursday, April 2.

If you have any questions, email makeart@ppld.org.

Program Outline

  • Contracted position for six weeks.
  • Five (5) hours of studio time per week onsite in Library 21c held at various days/times throughout the week to cover a wide variety of the library’s open hours. A portion of our makerspace will be designated to have the project being worked on by the artist/maker on display. It is preferred that these hours be split up at least two (2) different days per week.
  • Two (2) programs/classes presented at Library 21c, and two (2) programs/classes at other PPLD locations. All programs/classes will be made available to the general public, with PPLD responsible for participant signup. All program/class times and locations are to be determined by PPLD. These programs/classes must present our patrons with an activity-based, hands-on opportunity to learn a new skill. These programs will be mainly geared toward ages 16 and up.
  • Contract payment of $1,400, with up to another $300 reimbursement for supplies for public programs.
  • Contractor will be responsible for procuring all necessary consumable supplies. PPLD will reimburse Contractor for supply costs based on actual detailed receipts. All leftover supplies will become the property of PPLD.
  • Any resulting artwork or product created by the Contractor will become the property of PPLD.
  • Contractor will coordinate with PPLD in the making of a PPLD-produced video that promotes Contractor’s specific class content at PPLD.
  • Contractor is responsible for any travel costs related to the Independent Contractor Agreement activities.

Application Process

  • Complete and submit the Maker/Artist Application. Some web browsers are not compatible with PDF forms. If you using a PC, open the form in Internet Explorer or save it to your desktop and open it in Adobe Reader. If you are using a Mac, save the link to your desktop and open in Adobe Reader (not Preview, Mac's default PDF reader).
  • Submit a one page write-up proposal explaining your knowledge or craft, what you would plan to do for your studio hours project, the programs/classes you would like to present, and how they would benefit our patrons. Attach it to your email with your application. Applications without a proposal will not be considered. Proposals need to be in a .doc, .docx, or .pdf format.
  • If you have pictures you would like to submit with your application, please provide a link to a web address containing those photos in your email. If you must attach a photo, the size of all of the attachments cannot be greater than 10 MB.
  • Interviews will be held for makers and artists who are being considered.
  • If offered a residency, the maker/artist must sign PPLD’s Independent Contractor Agreement, fill out an IRS W9 form, and complete a PPLD paid background check.
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RoxAnne Krute

In this three-hour class, Artist in Residence RoxAnne Krute will teach you about a variety of tools and techniques for creating a collage of mixed media on canvas. You will explore how to use conventional and non-conventional objects to apply pigment and create texture together with added bits and pieces to create a unique finished piece of art. Follow an example or make your own choices of what to include in your piece – there are no mistakes! You are encouraged to bring your own personal bits and pieces to use if you wish!

Registration is required. (Please note some registrations might not yet be open.) Must be over 16 years old.

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2015 Teen Fiction Contest

The challenge:

Write an original fiction story of up to 2,500 words that begins with the sentence: “Sunlight and shadow flashed across the mountain.”* What happens from there is up to you!

Who can enter:

Middle school or high school students who are El Paso County residents.

Deadline:

Original, previously unpublished stories and entry forms must be submitted to Pikes Peak Library District staff by no later than 9:00 p.m. on June 30, 2015.

The top five middle school and the top five high school entries will be published in a PPLD eBook anthology. Winners will be notified by August 14, 2015.

See the entry form for official rules.

We take our theme for this year’s teen fiction contest from the library theme: Transformation at Elevation.

*A big thanks to Scribes & Bards (East Library), Teen Writing Group (Library 21c), and the Penrose Teen Writers’ Association (Penrose Library) for the selection of this year’s first line!

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Sarah Pottenger, Winner My Westside-Our Voice Essay Contest

Old Colorado City Library is pleased to announce the winners of our essay contest, My Westside--Our Voice. Our generous Friends of the Library supported this programming with a $100 prize for first place. The winner, Sarah Pottenger, is also published in the November 21, 2013 edition of the Westside Pioneer. Enjoy reading her essay along with our runners-up, Andrea Corley and Victor Shepard.

Your Westside is My Westside Now, by Sarah Pottenger - Winner

I’m a third-generation Colorado Springs native, and I’ve never wanted to live anywhere else. I grew up near Academy Boulevard, but some of my best memories are of visits to the Westside, whether to visit my parents’ old haunts, see the house where my grandmother was born, or just to take the car to the mechanic. Driving to the Westside was an event, taking half an hour.

I lived in that same house off Academy for twenty years. Then my family downsized from our house to a duplex just north of Old Colorado City. We moved here in 2010, and though it was a terrible move, we were here. For my parents, returning to the Westside was like coming home. For me, it was a dream come true. Every week one of us remarks that we still can’t believe we get to live here, even after nearly four years.

As a lifelong reader, I love the Old Colorado City Library. We can drive there in just a few minutes, or walk in half an hour. I probably visit three times a week, and it’s the prettiest, friendliest library in town. We’re also just minutes away from Fire Station #5, housing the wonderful firefighters who not only came to our rescue when my bedroom flooded during the September 12 storm, but also arrived within moments when my dad suffered a heart attack right before Christmas last year.

When we were children, my brother and I loved to come to the Westside. The Creamery was (and still is) our favorite ice cream shop. We liked to visit souvenir stores, dipping our hands into wooden bins brimming with polished rocks. My parents pointed out houses belonging to friends and relatives. My mom told stories about running downhill from school and spending nights with her grandparents, one set on Chestnut and one set on Uintah.

I have always loved it here. I pinch myself every day, hardly believing that I get to live here, that every time the car heads west, I’m going home.

The Circle in the Square, by Victor Shepard - Runner-Up

It’s funny how memories work. The passing of fifty five or so years doesn't diminish the desire to somehow recapture the beauty and love that were experienced so long ago. I know the ice cream was much sweeter and creamier then. The flowers my grandma raised were much more fragrant than flowers are today. And most definitely people were so much kinder then. People didn't have the apprehension and distance that is so prevalent today. At least that’s the way I choose to remember it.

Every child looks forward to summer and my summers always included visiting my grandmother in the “burg” of Colorado City. This was the main highlight of every summer and a time that I remember fondly. Grandma’s house was only a block away from the library where I read the adventures of the places I was going to visit one day when I was “old.” In close proximity were the drug stores with real fountains like Cooper-Lidke and the Rexall, a good place to get a chocolate or cherry Coke. Then I’d buy a fifteen cent wooden plane at the Duckwalls, which would last about ten minutes. In the center of this playground neighborhood was a park to play in with a central square and the treasure of the town, the first capitol of Colorado. This park was a hub where the entire neighborhood was welcomed and encouraged to come to.

Wednesday nights in the “burg” were the most special because that was the night when there was square dancing in the park. Although I was only six or seven, it was a weekly ritual that included special food and more importantly, staying up late. I’d get to wear my little cowboy boots and western shirt and get pinches from my grandma’s friends. Watching the big people in their fancy clothes, swiftly moving through difficult dance maneuvers, was quite a sight. But they all seemed happy and certainly appeared to be having a good time. Eventually, the inevitable happened, grandma wanted me to ask a very apprehensive little girl to dance. I was not a completely willing participant in the process but the coaxing finally compelled us wee ones to join in the confusing mob moving to an old man’s call on a screechy microphone. We were both confused and afraid of being trampled by the big people as they sashayed and promenaded around in close order. Somehow we devised our own rhythm and moves and somehow managed to avoid serious contact and injury. The more time we spent dancing the more fun it became. The dance seemed to last late into the night, and I must have been especially tired, as my grandma was forced to carry me home.

Yes, memories can cause us to smile and dancing can still wear me out but I wouldn't trade a moment I've experienced for half a dollar. I still love the park, the band shell and the fistful of valuable and memorable experiences that Bancroft Park has given me throughout many happy years.

Lower Gold Camp Road Today "Ties", by Andrea Corley - Runner-Up

I am a transplant, not a native Westsider. I came here to college and really never left. I have lived in the same place on the Westside for 46 years. I married a local man with Westside ties – railroad ties. His grandfather bought one of the railroads that traveled through the Westside to Cripple Creek a century ago, tore it up, sold the rolling stock and made a toll road for automobiles on the CS&CCDRY bed. It is now called the Gold Camp Road.

Yesterday, driving with a friend on Lower Gold Camp Road, we passed the ground-breaking for a new facility east of my friend’s home at The Village at Skyline. She did not know what is to be built there, but reading the current Westside Pioneer I learned it is to be a memory facility called Morning Star at Bear Creek. I thought” how fitting” in an area full of my family’s memories. The road we were traveling on next to this new facility was once-upon-a-time the initial part of what was called the Corley Mountain Highway. It was gently graded for train traffic first, as the route west out of Colorado Springs to the foothills for the railroad nicknamed ( because it was) the Short Line to Cripple Creek. Now a city street, Lower Gold Camp Road has become, according to Bill Vogrin in the Gazette, a race track for prospective buyers testing their new cars.

Next time you are there, testing or not, imagine the trains going and coming on that very roadway, loaded with freight or gold ore depending on the direction of travel, plains or mountains up ahead, tracks and ties, not tires, underneath you. Then, remember the clickety-clack rhythm of any train ride you have taken, and this becomes Time Travel for the Twenty-first Century with memories of your own. For me, a transplant in my adopted neighborhood, it becomes ties to my family members in their own time and place.

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