What's New!

Colorado Cinema Spotlight

Calling all filmmakers!

Colorado Cinema Spotlight is a half hour show that features the work of a Colorado Filmmaker and a one-on-one interview with him/her on PPLD TV (Comcast 17, Falcon Broadband 75).

The PPLD TV Film Evaluation Committee will be reviewing films for future shows. Interested filmmakers should submit films using the guidelines located here.

Send film submissions along with your completed entry form (available by clicking here) to the following address:

Pikes Peak Library District
PPLD TV
c/o Jamey Hastings
5550 N. Union Blvd.
Colorado Springs, CO 80918

You can also submit electronically by emailing a scanned and completed form and links to your work to jahastings@ppld.org.

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Sarah Pottenger, Winner My Westside-Our Voice Essay Contest

Old Colorado City Library is pleased to announce the winners of our essay contest, My Westside--Our Voice. Our generous Friends of the Library supported this programming with a $100 prize for first place. The winner, Sarah Pottenger, is also published in the November 21, 2013 edition of the Westside Pioneer. Enjoy reading her essay along with our runners-up, Andrea Corley and Victor Shepard.

Your Westside is My Westside Now, by Sarah Pottenger - Winner

I’m a third-generation Colorado Springs native, and I’ve never wanted to live anywhere else. I grew up near Academy Boulevard, but some of my best memories are of visits to the Westside, whether to visit my parents’ old haunts, see the house where my grandmother was born, or just to take the car to the mechanic. Driving to the Westside was an event, taking half an hour.

I lived in that same house off Academy for twenty years. Then my family downsized from our house to a duplex just north of Old Colorado City. We moved here in 2010, and though it was a terrible move, we were here. For my parents, returning to the Westside was like coming home. For me, it was a dream come true. Every week one of us remarks that we still can’t believe we get to live here, even after nearly four years.

As a lifelong reader, I love the Old Colorado City Library. We can drive there in just a few minutes, or walk in half an hour. I probably visit three times a week, and it’s the prettiest, friendliest library in town. We’re also just minutes away from Fire Station #5, housing the wonderful firefighters who not only came to our rescue when my bedroom flooded during the September 12 storm, but also arrived within moments when my dad suffered a heart attack right before Christmas last year.

When we were children, my brother and I loved to come to the Westside. The Creamery was (and still is) our favorite ice cream shop. We liked to visit souvenir stores, dipping our hands into wooden bins brimming with polished rocks. My parents pointed out houses belonging to friends and relatives. My mom told stories about running downhill from school and spending nights with her grandparents, one set on Chestnut and one set on Uintah.

I have always loved it here. I pinch myself every day, hardly believing that I get to live here, that every time the car heads west, I’m going home.

The Circle in the Square, by Victor Shepard - Runner-Up

It’s funny how memories work. The passing of fifty five or so years doesn't diminish the desire to somehow recapture the beauty and love that were experienced so long ago. I know the ice cream was much sweeter and creamier then. The flowers my grandma raised were much more fragrant than flowers are today. And most definitely people were so much kinder then. People didn't have the apprehension and distance that is so prevalent today. At least that’s the way I choose to remember it.

Every child looks forward to summer and my summers always included visiting my grandmother in the “burg” of Colorado City. This was the main highlight of every summer and a time that I remember fondly. Grandma’s house was only a block away from the library where I read the adventures of the places I was going to visit one day when I was “old.” In close proximity were the drug stores with real fountains like Cooper-Lidke and the Rexall, a good place to get a chocolate or cherry Coke. Then I’d buy a fifteen cent wooden plane at the Duckwalls, which would last about ten minutes. In the center of this playground neighborhood was a park to play in with a central square and the treasure of the town, the first capitol of Colorado. This park was a hub where the entire neighborhood was welcomed and encouraged to come to.

Wednesday nights in the “burg” were the most special because that was the night when there was square dancing in the park. Although I was only six or seven, it was a weekly ritual that included special food and more importantly, staying up late. I’d get to wear my little cowboy boots and western shirt and get pinches from my grandma’s friends. Watching the big people in their fancy clothes, swiftly moving through difficult dance maneuvers, was quite a sight. But they all seemed happy and certainly appeared to be having a good time. Eventually, the inevitable happened, grandma wanted me to ask a very apprehensive little girl to dance. I was not a completely willing participant in the process but the coaxing finally compelled us wee ones to join in the confusing mob moving to an old man’s call on a screechy microphone. We were both confused and afraid of being trampled by the big people as they sashayed and promenaded around in close order. Somehow we devised our own rhythm and moves and somehow managed to avoid serious contact and injury. The more time we spent dancing the more fun it became. The dance seemed to last late into the night, and I must have been especially tired, as my grandma was forced to carry me home.

Yes, memories can cause us to smile and dancing can still wear me out but I wouldn't trade a moment I've experienced for half a dollar. I still love the park, the band shell and the fistful of valuable and memorable experiences that Bancroft Park has given me throughout many happy years.

Lower Gold Camp Road Today "Ties", by Andrea Corley - Runner-Up

I am a transplant, not a native Westsider. I came here to college and really never left. I have lived in the same place on the Westside for 46 years. I married a local man with Westside ties – railroad ties. His grandfather bought one of the railroads that traveled through the Westside to Cripple Creek a century ago, tore it up, sold the rolling stock and made a toll road for automobiles on the CS&CCDRY bed. It is now called the Gold Camp Road.

Yesterday, driving with a friend on Lower Gold Camp Road, we passed the ground-breaking for a new facility east of my friend’s home at The Village at Skyline. She did not know what is to be built there, but reading the current Westside Pioneer I learned it is to be a memory facility called Morning Star at Bear Creek. I thought” how fitting” in an area full of my family’s memories. The road we were traveling on next to this new facility was once-upon-a-time the initial part of what was called the Corley Mountain Highway. It was gently graded for train traffic first, as the route west out of Colorado Springs to the foothills for the railroad nicknamed ( because it was) the Short Line to Cripple Creek. Now a city street, Lower Gold Camp Road has become, according to Bill Vogrin in the Gazette, a race track for prospective buyers testing their new cars.

Next time you are there, testing or not, imagine the trains going and coming on that very roadway, loaded with freight or gold ore depending on the direction of travel, plains or mountains up ahead, tracks and ties, not tires, underneath you. Then, remember the clickety-clack rhythm of any train ride you have taken, and this becomes Time Travel for the Twenty-first Century with memories of your own. For me, a transplant in my adopted neighborhood, it becomes ties to my family members in their own time and place.

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The Independent Film Society of Colorado will be showing two films at the Tim Gill Center for Public Media, 315 E. Costilla St. Admission to bother screenings is FREE, but donations to Indy GIVE will be encouraged. Refreshments will be available for purchase.

  • Thu., Nov. 21 at 7 p.m.: The World’s End
  • Thu., Dec. 19 at 7 p.m.: The Lone Ranger

For more information, contact kim.peterson@ifsoc.org or (719) 290-3126.

The Tim Gill Center is an initiative led by Rocky Mountain PBS in local partnership with University of Colorado-Colorado Springs, Radio Colorado College KRCC 91.5FM, Pikes Peak Community College, Pikes Peak Library District, and the Rocky Mountain Community Radio group's 16 public radio partners.

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PPLD.org has reached a major milestone: 10,000 entries! PPLD staff has contributed a staggering amount of information to the website in the three years it has been around in this iteration, making PPLD.org an accurate, up-to-date, and comprehensive representation of Pikes Peak Library District as a whole. Join us in congratulating our hard-working staff on this great accomplishment!

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Check presentation

When Vanika Hans was given a school assignment to start a project that benefits the community, she didn’t want to just go through the motions. “I didn’t want to do it just for the requirement,” she said, “but to actually help the community with something.” Hans, a 17-year-old attending Discovery Canyon High School, knew she loved to dance and thought she could use that talent to organize a donation-based dance camp for children. She is a patron of both the Briargate and Monument libraries in Pikes Peak Library District (PPLD) and thought that donating the money to help support the Library’s new facility at 1175 Chapel Hills Drive would be a huge benefit to her community.

From June 19 through August 17, Hans taught two classes per week – one in the basement of her house and one at a local fire station. Hans said that she had about 25 students attend between the two classes and managed to raise $805 through her efforts to support the new library. Some of the parents work for FedEx and Verizon, and these companies were both willing to match the donations of their employees!

Hans presented her donation to the Library at the October 15 PPLD Board of Trustees meeting. Hans said she plans to keep teaching dancing to support herself in college, where she thinks she will pursue a degree in biochemical engineering.

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Neil Gaiman: Why Our Future Depends on Libraries

In a recent lecture, celebrated author Neil Gaiman discussed among other things why libraries are so important to the future, how important it is to read for pleasure, and how there is no such thing as a bad children's book.

"... Libraries are about freedom. Freedom to read, freedom of ideas, freedom of communication. They are about education (which is not a process that finishes the day we leave school or university), about entertainment, about making safe spaces, and about access to information."

Read the transcript in its entirety here.

Search for Neil Gaiman in the Catalog

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Tom Clancy

Tom Clancy (April 12, 1947 – October 1, 2013) was an American author best known for his technically detailed espionage and military science story lines that are set during and in the aftermath of the Cold War 1.

Clancy's books were made into several successful films, including The Hunt for Red October, Patriot Games, and Clear and Present Danger.

Click here for a list of titles by Tom Clancy in the Catalog.

Leave a comment with your favorite Tom Clancy book or movie!

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Isabel Song, a member of TAB (Teens at Briargate), has a dream. One that is beautiful and ambitious in its scope. This dream has been highlighted by The Huffington Post and even Taylor Swift herself. Great article, Isabel, and we here at PPLD wish you every success in your endeavor.

Read 'Why I Dedicate My Life to Childhood Cancer'

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Hey kids! Come join us at Ruth Holley Library for a fun time making fabulous crafts. We'll provide the supplies, you bring your creativity. Light snacks will be served.

When: Fridays, 4 - 5:30 p.m.
Where: Ruth Holley Library

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